As you'd expect, given its association with the company largely seen as the classifiers of colour, the newly opened Pantone Hotel in south central Brussels is a riot of different hues. Interior designer Michel Penneman and architect Olivier Hannaert have developed a creative journey well beyond primary colours, against a restrained, predominantly white backdrop.

A blocky 1970s corner building has been entirely refurbished with exposed concrete pillars and polished terrazzo stone floors, which keep the lobby firmly grounded. Tall white stilts, decorated with changeable Pantone colour samples provide some zoning in this bright volume, where check-in and bar space merge across Corian counters, and a layering of authentic narratives starts with Scott Wilson's 'M2' series of foam furnishings for local producers Quinz & Milan.

The 60, largely white guestrooms are brought to life by photographer, Victor Lévy's super-saturated wall-sized images of gritty scenes witnessing the Brussels urban milieu. The satisfyingly deep reds of a cast iron bridge stanchion, lime green and white graffiti details or ephemeral violet interpretations of Veronica Janssens' 'Serendipity Installation' from the nearby Wiels cultural centre, decorate back-lit panels above beds.

Owner Avi Haim has not missed a trick in merchandising the branded homewares and fashion accessories of Pantone. Stylish Italian bicycles are set to line up at the entrance, in strict colour order of course, ready for guests to spread the Pantone-word across the city. Summer also sees the top floor terrace brought into action as a bar serving colour-coded cocktails.