Rosetta Getty is a force to be reckoned with. In addition to holding one of the most famous surnames in modern history (she is married to the actor Balthazar Getty, a great grandson of American oil magnate and industrialist J Paul Getty), the fashion designer has been the driving force behind three different fashion labels over the years, though none have bore her name until now.

This autumn, Getty will launch the debut collection for her new eponymous label, previewed here. Focused on bestowing a casual elegance to complement women's everyday lives, the crisp, well-formed collection is versatile, wearable and memorable - a combination that's genuinely hard to beat.

'I wanted to make clothing for today's women, which speaks to the need for a truly season-less jacket or a really great pair of trousers that look just as good and appropriate at 10am as they do at 9pm,' Getty explained. 'My life is about balance, and so is this collection. It's about balancing seasonality in fabrics and colours with a season-less approach to dressing, a busy morning running errands with an evening cocktail event, and the need for basics with the desire for special gowns.'

The brand's Autumn/Winter 2014 offering is unvarnished by trims and closures. All of the pieces exhibit flair in their construction and detailing, in spite of their minimal appearance. Classic staples, like cotton poplin shirts, are cut deeply to expose the décolletage, while oversized, knitted cardigans can be worn as is, draped around the shoulders or swathed around the neck, according to the climate in which it's donned. Elongated bib tunics and camisoles, with trailing asymmetric panels in the front or back, bring extra panache to the conventional shift top, and when worn over the brand's assortment of roomy, yet structured trousers, they form an individualistic, architectural ensemble.

Getty, who's first foray in fashion was as a model working with Bruce Weber and Azzedine Alaia, said, 'With this line, I wanted to address my personal dilemma, which was the need for beautiful, feminine clothes that work with my tomboy aesthetic.' Solutions come in the form of boxy, cocoon-like cashmere jackets that work refreshingly well when thrown over long velvet pencil skirts, sliced up to the thigh.

Eveningwear is another strong suit; gowns feature gamine apron and pinafore-like details, albeit rendered in luxurious wool crepe or heavyweight cotton. Languid shirt silhouettes are realised in seductive satin, and most notably, full-length alpaca coats boast sleeves cut out as panels to make that coveted over-the-shoulder drape all the easier.

'My goal for the debut collection was to focus on fabrics and silhouettes, first and foremost. I am obsessed with fabrics and I spend a tireless amount of time searching for and sourcing the best ones possible,' said the designer. 'I am personally not very keen on prints, but I do think the right print can make a look even better. We played with this great dark floral print on our velveteen dress and pant, which is incredibly subtle, but creates dimension in the garment. I prefer to play with prints in more subversive ways, like this.'

The artistic instincts displayed in the label's debut reflect the multi-layered working process of John Knuth, a Californian artist whom Getty met and was a source of inspiration for the concept. The visual blend of textures and finishes mirror Knuth's use of paint and different materials. 'This collection not only challenged me to think about fashion in a new way, but also pushed on a personal level to begin an honest and open creative dialogue,' she said. Even without the famous surname, the new Rosetta Getty brand is set to create a legacy all its own.