Gucci

The last time we saw metal-heavy 3D embellishment on the Gucci runway Frida Giannini was having her techno ikat moment.  Three years later both Gucci's Creative Director and her design sensibilities have matured considerably. Now the decoration comes in a prim womanly form with clusters of coloured costume jewels trimming the necks of colour pop tunics and floor-grazing gowns. High-wattage rocks were but one of many details that oriented the collection into the sphere of the swinging 1960s. There were whiffs of the leisure suit in the lean tunic tops worn over skinny straight pants, and a couture-like flair on the bell sleeves and the simple silk organza dresses trimmed in waves of paper-thin ruffles. The basic shapes and clean lines got jazzed up in buckets of solid colour - think raspberry sorbet, acid lemon, peach, grass green, pool blue and turquoise - all of which are antidotes to day job depression.
 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Gucci

The last time we saw metal-heavy 3D embellishment on the Gucci runway Frida Giannini was having her techno ikat moment.  Three years later both Gucci's Creative Director and her design sensibilities have matured considerably. Now the decoration comes in a prim womanly form with clusters of coloured costume jewels trimming the necks of colour pop tunics and floor-grazing gowns. High-wattage rocks were but one of many details that oriented the collection into the sphere of the swinging 1960s. There were whiffs of the leisure suit in the lean tunic tops worn over skinny straight pants, and a couture-like flair on the bell sleeves and the simple silk organza dresses trimmed in waves of paper-thin ruffles. The basic shapes and clean lines got jazzed up in buckets of solid colour - think raspberry sorbet, acid lemon, peach, grass green, pool blue and turquoise - all of which are antidotes to day job depression.
 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Gucci

The last time we saw metal-heavy 3D embellishment on the Gucci runway Frida Giannini was having her techno ikat moment.  Three years later both Gucci's Creative Director and her design sensibilities have matured considerably. Now the decoration comes in a prim womanly form with clusters of coloured costume jewels trimming the necks of colour pop tunics and floor-grazing gowns. High-wattage rocks were but one of many details that oriented the collection into the sphere of the swinging 1960s. There were whiffs of the leisure suit in the lean tunic tops worn over skinny straight pants, and a couture-like flair on the bell sleeves and the simple silk organza dresses trimmed in waves of paper-thin ruffles. The basic shapes and clean lines got jazzed up in buckets of solid colour - think raspberry sorbet, acid lemon, peach, grass green, pool blue and turquoise - all of which are antidotes to day job depression.
 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Gucci

The last time we saw metal-heavy 3D embellishment on the Gucci runway Frida Giannini was having her techno ikat moment.  Three years later both Gucci's Creative Director and her design sensibilities have matured considerably. Now the decoration comes in a prim womanly form with clusters of coloured costume jewels trimming the necks of colour pop tunics and floor-grazing gowns. High-wattage rocks were but one of many details that oriented the collection into the sphere of the swinging 1960s. There were whiffs of the leisure suit in the lean tunic tops worn over skinny straight pants, and a couture-like flair on the bell sleeves and the simple silk organza dresses trimmed in waves of paper-thin ruffles. The basic shapes and clean lines got jazzed up in buckets of solid colour - think raspberry sorbet, acid lemon, peach, grass green, pool blue and turquoise - all of which are antidotes to day job depression.
 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Gucci

The last time we saw metal-heavy 3D embellishment on the Gucci runway Frida Giannini was having her techno ikat moment.  Three years later both Gucci's Creative Director and her design sensibilities have matured considerably. Now the decoration comes in a prim womanly form with clusters of coloured costume jewels trimming the necks of colour pop tunics and floor-grazing gowns. High-wattage rocks were but one of many details that oriented the collection into the sphere of the swinging 1960s. There were whiffs of the leisure suit in the lean tunic tops worn over skinny straight pants, and a couture-like flair on the bell sleeves and the simple silk organza dresses trimmed in waves of paper-thin ruffles. The basic shapes and clean lines got jazzed up in buckets of solid colour - think raspberry sorbet, acid lemon, peach, grass green, pool blue and turquoise - all of which are antidotes to day job depression.
 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Gucci

The last time we saw metal-heavy 3D embellishment on the Gucci runway Frida Giannini was having her techno ikat moment.  Three years later both Gucci's Creative Director and her design sensibilities have matured considerably. Now the decoration comes in a prim womanly form with clusters of coloured costume jewels trimming the necks of colour pop tunics and floor-grazing gowns. High-wattage rocks were but one of many details that oriented the collection into the sphere of the swinging 1960s. There were whiffs of the leisure suit in the lean tunic tops worn over skinny straight pants, and a couture-like flair on the bell sleeves and the simple silk organza dresses trimmed in waves of paper-thin ruffles. The basic shapes and clean lines got jazzed up in buckets of solid colour - think raspberry sorbet, acid lemon, peach, grass green, pool blue and turquoise - all of which are antidotes to day job depression.
 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Max Mara

Sending millions of working women off to the office in safari gear sounds like a soft military operation gone wrong. But Max Mara is one of the last remaining Italian brands still openly concerned with what women might reasonably wear between the hours of nine to five. So, a below-the-knee pencil skirt (the sartorial workhorse for every working woman), paired with something boxy on top, provided the key silhouette of the season.  And then a showering of 'outback' details dropped down subtly, like the safari pockets and shoulder loops on silk shirts, collages of reptile and camouflage prints on skirts, and scarves that wound round heads like rogue office pantyhose. Even wilder was the animal kingdom of accessories - from antelope handbags to leopard print ponyskin clogs.  

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Max Mara

Sending millions of working women off to the office in safari gear sounds like a soft military operation gone wrong. But Max Mara is one of the last remaining Italian brands still openly concerned with what women might reasonably wear between the hours of nine to five. So, a below-the-knee pencil skirt (the sartorial workhorse for every working woman), paired with something boxy on top, provided the key silhouette of the season.  And then a showering of 'outback' details dropped down subtly, like the safari pockets and shoulder loops on silk shirts, collages of reptile and camouflage prints on skirts, and scarves that wound round heads like rogue office pantyhose. Even wilder was the animal kingdom of accessories - from antelope handbags to leopard print ponyskin clogs.  

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Max Mara

Sending millions of working women off to the office in safari gear sounds like a soft military operation gone wrong. But Max Mara is one of the last remaining Italian brands still openly concerned with what women might reasonably wear between the hours of nine to five. So, a below-the-knee pencil skirt (the sartorial workhorse for every working woman), paired with something boxy on top, provided the key silhouette of the season.  And then a showering of 'outback' details dropped down subtly, like the safari pockets and shoulder loops on silk shirts, collages of reptile and camouflage prints on skirts, and scarves that wound round heads like rogue office pantyhose. Even wilder was the animal kingdom of accessories - from antelope handbags to leopard print ponyskin clogs.  

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Max Mara

Sending millions of working women off to the office in safari gear sounds like a soft military operation gone wrong. But Max Mara is one of the last remaining Italian brands still openly concerned with what women might reasonably wear between the hours of nine to five. So, a below-the-knee pencil skirt (the sartorial workhorse for every working woman), paired with something boxy on top, provided the key silhouette of the season.  And then a showering of 'outback' details dropped down subtly, like the safari pockets and shoulder loops on silk shirts, collages of reptile and camouflage prints on skirts, and scarves that wound round heads like rogue office pantyhose. Even wilder was the animal kingdom of accessories - from antelope handbags to leopard print ponyskin clogs.  

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Max Mara

Sending millions of working women off to the office in safari gear sounds like a soft military operation gone wrong. But Max Mara is one of the last remaining Italian brands still openly concerned with what women might reasonably wear between the hours of nine to five. So, a below-the-knee pencil skirt (the sartorial workhorse for every working woman), paired with something boxy on top, provided the key silhouette of the season.  And then a showering of 'outback' details dropped down subtly, like the safari pockets and shoulder loops on silk shirts, collages of reptile and camouflage prints on skirts, and scarves that wound round heads like rogue office pantyhose. Even wilder was the animal kingdom of accessories - from antelope handbags to leopard print ponyskin clogs.  

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Emporio Armani

A designer can sometimes get frisky in the summertime heat. But Giorgio Armani does his best work for his younger Emporio line when he keeps the warm-weathered exuberance on a tight leash. This season's collection was anchored firmly down to earth in sandy neutral shades that Armani wittily called 'make-up for the skin'. The beige-on-beige effect created a clean canvas for the designer's more fanciful conceits such as stiff metallic skirts, shorts suits, and fluid knitwear. Best of all were the slim folded handbags and two-tone suede heels. Redrawn in a minimalist, pared back hand, they embodied what the designer is known and adored for.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Emporio Armani

A designer can sometimes get frisky in the summertime heat. But Giorgio Armani does his best work for his younger Emporio line when he keeps the warm-weathered exuberance on a tight leash. This season's collection was anchored firmly down to earth in sandy neutral shades that Armani wittily called 'make-up for the skin'. The beige-on-beige effect created a clean canvas for the designer's more fanciful conceits such as stiff metallic skirts, shorts suits, and fluid knitwear. Best of all were the slim folded handbags and two-tone suede heels. Redrawn in a minimalist, pared back hand, they embodied what the designer is known and adored for.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Emporio Armani

A designer can sometimes get frisky in the summertime heat. But Giorgio Armani does his best work for his younger Emporio line when he keeps the warm-weathered exuberance on a tight leash. This season's collection was anchored firmly down to earth in sandy neutral shades that Armani wittily called 'make-up for the skin'. The beige-on-beige effect created a clean canvas for the designer's more fanciful conceits such as stiff metallic skirts, shorts suits, and fluid knitwear. Best of all were the slim folded handbags and two-tone suede heels. Redrawn in a minimalist, pared back hand, they embodied what the designer is known and adored for.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Emporio Armani

A designer can sometimes get frisky in the summertime heat. But Giorgio Armani does his best work for his younger Emporio line when he keeps the warm-weathered exuberance on a tight leash. This season's collection was anchored firmly down to earth in sandy neutral shades that Armani wittily called 'make-up for the skin'. The beige-on-beige effect created a clean canvas for the designer's more fanciful conceits such as stiff metallic skirts, shorts suits, and fluid knitwear. Best of all were the slim folded handbags and two-tone suede heels. Redrawn in a minimalist, pared back hand, they embodied what the designer is known and adored for.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Emporio Armani

A designer can sometimes get frisky in the summertime heat. But Giorgio Armani does his best work for his younger Emporio line when he keeps the warm-weathered exuberance on a tight leash. This season's collection was anchored firmly down to earth in sandy neutral shades that Armani wittily called 'make-up for the skin'. The beige-on-beige effect created a clean canvas for the designer's more fanciful conceits such as stiff metallic skirts, shorts suits, and fluid knitwear. Best of all were the slim folded handbags and two-tone suede heels. Redrawn in a minimalist, pared back hand, they embodied what the designer is known and adored for.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

Thanks to Miuccia Prada, the very Japanese socks-over-flip-flops look has officially moved from cringe-worthy to cool. Yes, that's right. Socks are back. But this time they're gussied up in flashy red or kittenish pink leather and worn with brick-sized platforms held together with prim satin tuxedo bows. If that weren't enough, the mammoth bases on this far-out footwear also came pierced with giant holes the size of paint cans. Clearly, Prada's trademark 'ugly' is back in with a bang this season. Make that split-end bangs - which is the frightful state that every model found her hair in.  Despite an attempt to dress up in swaths of stiff satin miniskirts and matching wrap tops, these girls looked more at home in their candy pink mink bathrobes, long underwear style knit briefs, and flower-rimmed sunglasses. Clearly, they'd much rather stay in bed all day with their rocking socks.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

Thanks to Miuccia Prada, the very Japanese socks-over-flip-flops look has officially moved from cringe-worthy to cool. Yes, that's right. Socks are back. But this time they're gussied up in flashy red or kittenish pink leather and worn with brick-sized platforms held together with prim satin tuxedo bows. If that weren't enough, the mammoth bases on this far-out footwear also came pierced with giant holes the size of paint cans. Clearly, Prada's trademark 'ugly' is back in with a bang this season. Make that split-end bangs - which is the frightful state that every model found her hair in.  Despite an attempt to dress up in swaths of stiff satin miniskirts and matching wrap tops, these girls looked more at home in their candy pink mink bathrobes, long underwear style knit briefs, and flower-rimmed sunglasses. Clearly, they'd much rather stay in bed all day with their rocking socks.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

Thanks to Miuccia Prada, the very Japanese socks-over-flip-flops look has officially moved from cringe-worthy to cool. Yes, that's right. Socks are back. But this time they're gussied up in flashy red or kittenish pink leather and worn with brick-sized platforms held together with prim satin tuxedo bows. If that weren't enough, the mammoth bases on this far-out footwear also came pierced with giant holes the size of paint cans. Clearly, Prada's trademark 'ugly' is back in with a bang this season. Make that split-end bangs - which is the frightful state that every model found her hair in.  Despite an attempt to dress up in swaths of stiff satin miniskirts and matching wrap tops, these girls looked more at home in their candy pink mink bathrobes, long underwear style knit briefs, and flower-rimmed sunglasses. Clearly, they'd much rather stay in bed all day with their rocking socks.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

Thanks to Miuccia Prada, the very Japanese socks-over-flip-flops look has officially moved from cringe-worthy to cool. Yes, that's right. Socks are back. But this time they're gussied up in flashy red or kittenish pink leather and worn with brick-sized platforms held together with prim satin tuxedo bows. If that weren't enough, the mammoth bases on this far-out footwear also came pierced with giant holes the size of paint cans. Clearly, Prada's trademark 'ugly' is back in with a bang this season. Make that split-end bangs - which is the frightful state that every model found her hair in.  Despite an attempt to dress up in swaths of stiff satin miniskirts and matching wrap tops, these girls looked more at home in their candy pink mink bathrobes, long underwear style knit briefs, and flower-rimmed sunglasses. Clearly, they'd much rather stay in bed all day with their rocking socks.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

Thanks to Miuccia Prada, the very Japanese socks-over-flip-flops look has officially moved from cringe-worthy to cool. Yes, that's right. Socks are back. But this time they're gussied up in flashy red or kittenish pink leather and worn with brick-sized platforms held together with prim satin tuxedo bows. If that weren't enough, the mammoth bases on this far-out footwear also came pierced with giant holes the size of paint cans. Clearly, Prada's trademark 'ugly' is back in with a bang this season. Make that split-end bangs - which is the frightful state that every model found her hair in.  Despite an attempt to dress up in swaths of stiff satin miniskirts and matching wrap tops, these girls looked more at home in their candy pink mink bathrobes, long underwear style knit briefs, and flower-rimmed sunglasses. Clearly, they'd much rather stay in bed all day with their rocking socks.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

Thanks to Miuccia Prada, the very Japanese socks-over-flip-flops look has officially moved from cringe-worthy to cool. Yes, that's right. Socks are back. But this time they're gussied up in flashy red or kittenish pink leather and worn with brick-sized platforms held together with prim satin tuxedo bows. If that weren't enough, the mammoth bases on this far-out footwear also came pierced with giant holes the size of paint cans. Clearly, Prada's trademark 'ugly' is back in with a bang this season. Make that split-end bangs - which is the frightful state that every model found her hair in.  Despite an attempt to dress up in swaths of stiff satin miniskirts and matching wrap tops, these girls looked more at home in their candy pink mink bathrobes, long underwear style knit briefs, and flower-rimmed sunglasses. Clearly, they'd much rather stay in bed all day with their rocking socks.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ports 1961

The all-white ensembles at Ports 1961 bordered on the clerical from the waist up, where square shoulders, knife-sharp collars and crisp sport sleeves cut a severe line. But the clothes avoided monastic monotony with feminine layers of lace and neat accordion-folded chiffon that spilled out beneath skirts like renegade slips. The idea of layering was an ongoing theme this season that slowly built up in the gauzy backless dresses and shirts. It hit a peak in the bright neon dresses that came caged in columns of filmy sheer white chiffon. The transparent overlays muffled the loud ocular, blurring its definition like an underwater fantasy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ports 1961

The all-white ensembles at Ports 1961 bordered on the clerical from the waist up, where square shoulders, knife-sharp collars and crisp sport sleeves cut a severe line. But the clothes avoided monastic monotony with feminine layers of lace and neat accordion-folded chiffon that spilled out beneath skirts like renegade slips. The idea of layering was an ongoing theme this season that slowly built up in the gauzy backless dresses and shirts. It hit a peak in the bright neon dresses that came caged in columns of filmy sheer white chiffon. The transparent overlays muffled the loud ocular, blurring its definition like an underwater fantasy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ports 1961

The all-white ensembles at Ports 1961 bordered on the clerical from the waist up, where square shoulders, knife-sharp collars and crisp sport sleeves cut a severe line. But the clothes avoided monastic monotony with feminine layers of lace and neat accordion-folded chiffon that spilled out beneath skirts like renegade slips. The idea of layering was an ongoing theme this season that slowly built up in the gauzy backless dresses and shirts. It hit a peak in the bright neon dresses that came caged in columns of filmy sheer white chiffon. The transparent overlays muffled the loud ocular, blurring its definition like an underwater fantasy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin
 

Ports 1961

The all-white ensembles at Ports 1961 bordered on the clerical from the waist up, where square shoulders, knife-sharp collars and crisp sport sleeves cut a severe line. But the clothes avoided monastic monotony with feminine layers of lace and neat accordion-folded chiffon that spilled out beneath skirts like renegade slips. The idea of layering was an ongoing theme this season that slowly built up in the gauzy backless dresses and shirts. It hit a peak in the bright neon dresses that came caged in columns of filmy sheer white chiffon. The transparent overlays muffled the loud ocular, blurring its definition like an underwater fantasy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ports 1961

The all-white ensembles at Ports 1961 bordered on the clerical from the waist up, where square shoulders, knife-sharp collars and crisp sport sleeves cut a severe line. But the clothes avoided monastic monotony with feminine layers of lace and neat accordion-folded chiffon that spilled out beneath skirts like renegade slips. The idea of layering was an ongoing theme this season that slowly built up in the gauzy backless dresses and shirts. It hit a peak in the bright neon dresses that came caged in columns of filmy sheer white chiffon. The transparent overlays muffled the loud ocular, blurring its definition like an underwater fantasy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Sportmax

You know it's going to be a good show when Sportmax plays up to the first four letters of its name. For Spring, the Italian brand speared its sportiness with high concept, modern fashion. The results, often architectural in their raw cut lines, were not lost on a design audience like us.  Windowpane checks, chevrons and zipper seaming were a very 21st Century form of decoration, but used on a clean white canvas of stiff leather and oversized compact knits, their impact multiplied. The best piece in the collection however was an apple green leather skirt and matching top that was juicy enough to eat.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin
 

Sportmax

You know it's going to be a good show when Sportmax plays up to the first four letters of its name. For Spring, the Italian brand speared its sportiness with high concept, modern fashion. The results, often architectural in their raw cut lines, were not lost on a design audience like us.  Windowpane checks, chevrons and zipper seaming were a very 21st Century form of decoration, but used on a clean white canvas of stiff leather and oversized compact knits, their impact multiplied. The best piece in the collection however was an apple green leather skirt and matching top that was juicy enough to eat.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Sportmax

You know it's going to be a good show when Sportmax plays up to the first four letters of its name. For Spring, the Italian brand speared its sportiness with high concept, modern fashion. The results, often architectural in their raw cut lines, were not lost on a design audience like us.  Windowpane checks, chevrons and zipper seaming were a very 21st Century form of decoration, but used on a clean white canvas of stiff leather and oversized compact knits, their impact multiplied. The best piece in the collection however was an apple green leather skirt and matching top that was juicy enough to eat.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Sportmax

You know it's going to be a good show when Sportmax plays up to the first four letters of its name. For Spring, the Italian brand speared its sportiness with high concept, modern fashion. The results, often architectural in their raw cut lines, were not lost on a design audience like us.  Windowpane checks, chevrons and zipper seaming were a very 21st Century form of decoration, but used on a clean white canvas of stiff leather and oversized compact knits, their impact multiplied. The best piece in the collection however was an apple green leather skirt and matching top that was juicy enough to eat.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Sportmax

You know it's going to be a good show when Sportmax plays up to the first four letters of its name. For Spring, the Italian brand speared its sportiness with high concept, modern fashion. The results, often architectural in their raw cut lines, were not lost on a design audience like us.  Windowpane checks, chevrons and zipper seaming were a very 21st Century form of decoration, but used on a clean white canvas of stiff leather and oversized compact knits, their impact multiplied. The best piece in the collection however was an apple green leather skirt and matching top that was juicy enough to eat.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Versace

Short and sassy was the order of the day at Versace - not exactly a surprise from a house where the length of the legs have always trumped the square metres of fabric on display. And my, how the bronzed legs shone in whippet-thin wrap skirts, silk printed kaftans and slinky jersey tunics. Working up a dusty pastel palette evoking a sunset in New Mexico, Donatella Versace managed to conjure up the idea of a wild woman making her way through the dusty plains with nothing but a slashed skirt to protect her. For evening, the embellishment went nearly ethnic - a new twist at this resolutely glossy fashion house.  Cloud-printed pastel dresses or full-length gowns cut close to the waist were covered in a shower of silver fringe - like hula skirts for the girl out on the town. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Versace

Short and sassy was the order of the day at Versace - not exactly a surprise from a house where the length of the legs have always trumped the square metres of fabric on display. And my, how the bronzed legs shone in whippet-thin wrap skirts, silk printed kaftans and slinky jersey tunics. Working up a dusty pastel palette evoking a sunset in New Mexico, Donatella Versace managed to conjure up the idea of a wild woman making her way through the dusty plains with nothing but a slashed skirt to protect her. For evening, the embellishment went nearly ethnic - a new twist at this resolutely glossy fashion house.  Cloud-printed pastel dresses or full-length gowns cut close to the waist were covered in a shower of silver fringe - like hula skirts for the girl out on the town. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Versace

Short and sassy was the order of the day at Versace - not exactly a surprise from a house where the length of the legs have always trumped the square metres of fabric on display. And my, how the bronzed legs shone in whippet-thin wrap skirts, silk printed kaftans and slinky jersey tunics. Working up a dusty pastel palette evoking a sunset in New Mexico, Donatella Versace managed to conjure up the idea of a wild woman making her way through the dusty plains with nothing but a slashed skirt to protect her. For evening, the embellishment went nearly ethnic - a new twist at this resolutely glossy fashion house.  Cloud-printed pastel dresses or full-length gowns cut close to the waist were covered in a shower of silver fringe - like hula skirts for the girl out on the town. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Versace

Short and sassy was the order of the day at Versace - not exactly a surprise from a house where the length of the legs have always trumped the square metres of fabric on display. And my, how the bronzed legs shone in whippet-thin wrap skirts, silk printed kaftans and slinky jersey tunics. Working up a dusty pastel palette evoking a sunset in New Mexico, Donatella Versace managed to conjure up the idea of a wild woman making her way through the dusty plains with nothing but a slashed skirt to protect her. For evening, the embellishment went nearly ethnic - a new twist at this resolutely glossy fashion house.  Cloud-printed pastel dresses or full-length gowns cut close to the waist were covered in a shower of silver fringe - like hula skirts for the girl out on the town. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Versace

Short and sassy was the order of the day at Versace - not exactly a surprise from a house where the length of the legs have always trumped the square metres of fabric on display. And my, how the bronzed legs shone in whippet-thin wrap skirts, silk printed kaftans and slinky jersey tunics. Working up a dusty pastel palette evoking a sunset in New Mexico, Donatella Versace managed to conjure up the idea of a wild woman making her way through the dusty plains with nothing but a slashed skirt to protect her. For evening, the embellishment went nearly ethnic - a new twist at this resolutely glossy fashion house.  Cloud-printed pastel dresses or full-length gowns cut close to the waist were covered in a shower of silver fringe - like hula skirts for the girl out on the town. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Versus

It is hard to talk about the clothes on the models backstage at the Versus show when the real action was happening on stage with Beth Ditto belting her lungs out in front of the runway. But we'll try.  First, out trotted a line-up of optimistic raspberry acid leather, slashed and studded to an inch of its life. Then came a technicolour wonderland of primary-toned argyle knits, and Marimekko-style foral printed silks. Oversized plastic braiding, which trimmed every skirt, jumper and dress, offered playful counterpoint to the more subversive plastic raincoats and kinky overlays. It was a clear reminder that the brand is a light-hearted counterpart to its big sister, Versace, who takes strutting a lot more seriously.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Versus

It is hard to talk about the clothes on the models backstage at the Versus show when the real action was happening on stage with Beth Ditto belting her lungs out in front of the runway. But we'll try.  First, out trotted a line-up of optimistic raspberry acid leather, slashed and studded to an inch of its life. Then came a technicolour wonderland of primary-toned argyle knits, and Marimekko-style foral printed silks. Oversized plastic braiding, which trimmed every skirt, jumper and dress, offered playful counterpoint to the more subversive plastic raincoats and kinky overlays. It was a clear reminder that the brand is a light-hearted counterpart to its big sister, Versace, who takes strutting a lot more seriously.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Versus

It is hard to talk about the clothes on the models backstage at the Versus show when the real action was happening on stage with Beth Ditto belting her lungs out in front of the runway. But we'll try.  First, out trotted a line-up of optimistic raspberry acid leather, slashed and studded to an inch of its life. Then came a technicolour wonderland of primary-toned argyle knits, and Marimekko-style foral printed silks. Oversized plastic braiding, which trimmed every skirt, jumper and dress, offered playful counterpoint to the more subversive plastic raincoats and kinky overlays. It was a clear reminder that the brand is a light-hearted counterpart to its big sister, Versace, who takes strutting a lot more seriously.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Versus

It is hard to talk about the clothes on the models backstage at the Versus show when the real action was happening on stage with Beth Ditto belting her lungs out in front of the runway. But we'll try.  First, out trotted a line-up of optimistic raspberry acid leather, slashed and studded to an inch of its life. Then came a technicolour wonderland of primary-toned argyle knits, and Marimekko-style foral printed silks. Oversized plastic braiding, which trimmed every skirt, jumper and dress, offered playful counterpoint to the more subversive plastic raincoats and kinky overlays. It was a clear reminder that the brand is a light-hearted counterpart to its big sister, Versace, who takes strutting a lot more seriously.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Versus

It is hard to talk about the clothes on the models backstage at the Versus show when the real action was happening on stage with Beth Ditto belting her lungs out in front of the runway. But we'll try.  First, out trotted a line-up of optimistic raspberry acid leather, slashed and studded to an inch of its life. Then came a technicolour wonderland of primary-toned argyle knits, and Marimekko-style foral printed silks. Oversized plastic braiding, which trimmed every skirt, jumper and dress, offered playful counterpoint to the more subversive plastic raincoats and kinky overlays. It was a clear reminder that the brand is a light-hearted counterpart to its big sister, Versace, who takes strutting a lot more seriously.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Bottega Veneta

A magnifying glass may not have been needed to unearth the surface detail of the S/S 2013 Bottega Veneta collection, but the visual experience of these remarkable designs was considerably enhanced upon closer inspection. What looked like a blur of pattern from afar came into swift focus up close, where printed chiffon was colourfully spliced with python pleating or trimmed grids of studded snakeskin. The workmanship was outrageously gorgeous, as seen on dresses embellished with vertical rows of floral appliqués, and all the more enjoyable on simple 1940s ladylike silhouettes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Bottega Veneta

A magnifying glass may not have been needed to unearth the surface detail of the S/S 2013 Bottega Veneta collection, but the visual experience of these remarkable designs was considerably enhanced upon closer inspection. What looked like a blur of pattern from afar came into swift focus up close, where printed chiffon was colourfully spliced with python pleating or trimmed grids of studded snakeskin. The workmanship was outrageously gorgeous, as seen on dresses embellished with vertical rows of floral appliqués, and all the more enjoyable on simple 1940s ladylike silhouettes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Bottega Veneta

A magnifying glass may not have been needed to unearth the surface detail of the S/S 2013 Bottega Veneta collection, but the visual experience of these remarkable designs was considerably enhanced upon closer inspection. What looked like a blur of pattern from afar came into swift focus up close, where printed chiffon was colourfully spliced with python pleating or trimmed grids of studded snakeskin. The workmanship was outrageously gorgeous, as seen on dresses embellished with vertical rows of floral appliqués, and all the more enjoyable on simple 1940s ladylike silhouettes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Bottega Veneta

A magnifying glass may not have been needed to unearth the surface detail of the S/S 2013 Bottega Veneta collection, but the visual experience of these remarkable designs was considerably enhanced upon closer inspection. What looked like a blur of pattern from afar came into swift focus up close, where printed chiffon was colourfully spliced with python pleating or trimmed grids of studded snakeskin. The workmanship was outrageously gorgeous, as seen on dresses embellished with vertical rows of floral appliqués, and all the more enjoyable on simple 1940s ladylike silhouettes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Bottega Veneta

A magnifying glass may not have been needed to unearth the surface detail of the S/S 2013 Bottega Veneta collection, but the visual experience of these remarkable designs was considerably enhanced upon closer inspection. What looked like a blur of pattern from afar came into swift focus up close, where printed chiffon was colourfully spliced with python pleating or trimmed grids of studded snakeskin. The workmanship was outrageously gorgeous, as seen on dresses embellished with vertical rows of floral appliqués, and all the more enjoyable on simple 1940s ladylike silhouettes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Fendi

In the early 1980s when Milan was a thumping international metropolis, Karl Lagerfeld had an apartment in the city that was covered head-to-toe in Memphis furniture. Thirty years later, backstage at the Fendi S/S 2013 show, the designer said that the vibrant colours and architectural furniture shapes of the Ettore Sottsass design collective had subconsciously inched their way onto his spring runway. 'I didn't set out to do Memphis, but the collection ended up looking a lot like it,' says Lagerfeld. The garments, blocked in brightly coloured, geometric lines and the shoes with their incandescent Rubik's cube-tiled heels, was in fact a nod towards industrial design. But we're pretty sure no one in the design world has ever thought to spray paint a digital pattern onto shaved mink, and that alone comes from the pure genius of the Fendi fashion fantasy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Fendi

In the early 1980s when Milan was a thumping international metropolis, Karl Lagerfeld had an apartment in the city that was covered head-to-toe in Memphis furniture. Thirty years later, backstage at the Fendi S/S 2013 show, the designer said that the vibrant colours and architectural furniture shapes of the Ettore Sottsass design collective had subconsciously inched their way onto his spring runway. 'I didn't set out to do Memphis, but the collection ended up looking a lot like it,' says Lagerfeld. The garments, blocked in brightly coloured, geometric lines and the shoes with their incandescent Rubik's cube-tiled heels, was in fact a nod towards industrial design. But we're pretty sure no one in the design world has ever thought to spray paint a digital pattern onto shaved mink, and that alone comes from the pure genius of the Fendi fashion fantasy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Fendi

In the early 1980s when Milan was a thumping international metropolis, Karl Lagerfeld had an apartment in the city that was covered head-to-toe in Memphis furniture. Thirty years later, backstage at the Fendi S/S 2013 show, the designer said that the vibrant colours and architectural furniture shapes of the Ettore Sottsass design collective had subconsciously inched their way onto his spring runway. 'I didn't set out to do Memphis, but the collection ended up looking a lot like it,' says Lagerfeld. The garments, blocked in brightly coloured, geometric lines and the shoes with their incandescent Rubik's cube-tiled heels, was in fact a nod towards industrial design. But we're pretty sure no one in the design world has ever thought to spray paint a digital pattern onto shaved mink, and that alone comes from the pure genius of the Fendi fashion fantasy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Fendi

In the early 1980s when Milan was a thumping international metropolis, Karl Lagerfeld had an apartment in the city that was covered head-to-toe in Memphis furniture. Thirty years later, backstage at the Fendi S/S 2013 show, the designer said that the vibrant colours and architectural furniture shapes of the Ettore Sottsass design collective had subconsciously inched their way onto his spring runway. 'I didn't set out to do Memphis, but the collection ended up looking a lot like it,' says Lagerfeld. The garments, blocked in brightly coloured, geometric lines and the shoes with their incandescent Rubik's cube-tiled heels, was in fact a nod towards industrial design. But we're pretty sure no one in the design world has ever thought to spray paint a digital pattern onto shaved mink, and that alone comes from the pure genius of the Fendi fashion fantasy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Fendi

In the early 1980s when Milan was a thumping international metropolis, Karl Lagerfeld had an apartment in the city that was covered head-to-toe in Memphis furniture. Thirty years later, backstage at the Fendi S/S 2013 show, the designer said that the vibrant colours and architectural furniture shapes of the Ettore Sottsass design collective had subconsciously inched their way onto his spring runway. 'I didn't set out to do Memphis, but the collection ended up looking a lot like it,' says Lagerfeld. The garments, blocked in brightly coloured, geometric lines and the shoes with their incandescent Rubik's cube-tiled heels, was in fact a nod towards industrial design. But we're pretty sure no one in the design world has ever thought to spray paint a digital pattern onto shaved mink, and that alone comes from the pure genius of the Fendi fashion fantasy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Jil Sander

Jil Sander's first women's show since returning (for the third time) to her namesake fashion label was a study in nonchalant simplicity. With no decoration except a splash of iridescent bubble disks in the final few looks, Sander concerned herself with new tapered and spherical shapes, that emerged subtly on a canvas of impeccable crafted silks and stiffened double-face cottons. A new play with proportion blew air into the arms of cocoon-shaped sleeves and under the legs of skirts that puffed into clean shapes. Worn with robotic 3/4 length boots (tough even for the models’ gamine legs), Sander’s minimalistic universe was rendered in a chilling white, mixed with uniform colours of navy and burgundy and a pop of acid tomato.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Jil Sander

Jil Sander's first women's show since returning (for the third time) to her namesake fashion label was a study in nonchalant simplicity. With no decoration except a splash of iridescent bubble disks in the final few looks, Sander concerned herself with new tapered and spherical shapes, that emerged subtly on a canvas of impeccable crafted silks and stiffened double-face cottons. A new play with proportion blew air into the arms of cocoon-shaped sleeves and under the legs of skirts that puffed into clean shapes. Worn with robotic 3/4 length boots (tough even for the models’ gamine legs), Sander’s minimalistic universe was rendered in a chilling white, mixed with uniform colours of navy and burgundy and a pop of acid tomato.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Jil Sander

Jil Sander's first women's show since returning (for the third time) to her namesake fashion label was a study in nonchalant simplicity. With no decoration except a splash of iridescent bubble disks in the final few looks, Sander concerned herself with new tapered and spherical shapes, that emerged subtly on a canvas of impeccable crafted silks and stiffened double-face cottons. A new play with proportion blew air into the arms of cocoon-shaped sleeves and under the legs of skirts that puffed into clean shapes. Worn with robotic 3/4 length boots (tough even for the models’ gamine legs), Sander’s minimalistic universe was rendered in a chilling white, mixed with uniform colours of navy and burgundy and a pop of acid tomato.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Jil Sander

Jil Sander's first women's show since returning (for the third time) to her namesake fashion label was a study in nonchalant simplicity. With no decoration except a splash of iridescent bubble disks in the final few looks, Sander concerned herself with new tapered and spherical shapes, that emerged subtly on a canvas of impeccable crafted silks and stiffened double-face cottons. A new play with proportion blew air into the arms of cocoon-shaped sleeves and under the legs of skirts that puffed into clean shapes. Worn with robotic 3/4 length boots (tough even for the models’ gamine legs), Sander’s minimalistic universe was rendered in a chilling white, mixed with uniform colours of navy and burgundy and a pop of acid tomato.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Jil Sander

Jil Sander's first women's show since returning (for the third time) to her namesake fashion label was a study in nonchalant simplicity. With no decoration except a splash of iridescent bubble disks in the final few looks, Sander concerned herself with new tapered and spherical shapes, that emerged subtly on a canvas of impeccable crafted silks and stiffened double-face cottons. A new play with proportion blew air into the arms of cocoon-shaped sleeves and under the legs of skirts that puffed into clean shapes. Worn with robotic 3/4 length boots (tough even for the models’ gamine legs), Sander’s minimalistic universe was rendered in a chilling white, mixed with uniform colours of navy and burgundy and a pop of acid tomato.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Emilio Pucci

How to create the illusion of pattern without relying directly on the expected printing techniques? That has been Peter Dundas' mission ever since his arrival at the print-tastic house of Emilio Pucci nearly four years ago. This season he played with clean canvases of white; layering über thin white layers over all-white thread embroideries. The illusionistic effect Dundas was channelling (body tattoos of dragons and tigers emerging onto the skin through the veiling) worked on the all white variations, but less so on the later veiled looks. The best pieces of the collection however, were the embroidered bomber jacket as well as a structured army kimono, that was covered in whimsical embroidered flight destinations on its rear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Emilio Pucci

How to create the illusion of pattern without relying directly on the expected printing techniques? That has been Peter Dundas' mission ever since his arrival at the print-tastic house of Emilio Pucci nearly four years ago. This season he played with clean canvases of white; layering über thin white layers over all-white thread embroideries. The illusionistic effect Dundas was channelling (body tattoos of dragons and tigers emerging onto the skin through the veiling) worked on the all white variations, but less so on the later veiled looks. The best pieces of the collection however, were the embroidered bomber jacket as well as a structured army kimono, that was covered in whimsical embroidered flight destinations on its rear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Emilio Pucci

How to create the illusion of pattern without relying directly on the expected printing techniques? That has been Peter Dundas' mission ever since his arrival at the print-tastic house of Emilio Pucci nearly four years ago. This season he played with clean canvases of white; layering über thin white layers over all-white thread embroideries. The illusionistic effect Dundas was channelling (body tattoos of dragons and tigers emerging onto the skin through the veiling) worked on the all white variations, but less so on the later veiled looks. The best pieces of the collection however, were the embroidered bomber jacket as well as a structured army kimono, that was covered in whimsical embroidered flight destinations on its rear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Emilio Pucci

How to create the illusion of pattern without relying directly on the expected printing techniques? That has been Peter Dundas' mission ever since his arrival at the print-tastic house of Emilio Pucci nearly four years ago. This season he played with clean canvases of white; layering über thin white layers over all-white thread embroideries. The illusionistic effect Dundas was channelling (body tattoos of dragons and tigers emerging onto the skin through the veiling) worked on the all white variations, but less so on the later veiled looks. The best pieces of the collection however, were the embroidered bomber jacket as well as a structured army kimono, that was covered in whimsical embroidered flight destinations on its rear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Emilio Pucci

How to create the illusion of pattern without relying directly on the expected printing techniques? That has been Peter Dundas' mission ever since his arrival at the print-tastic house of Emilio Pucci nearly four years ago. This season he played with clean canvases of white; layering über thin white layers over all-white thread embroideries. The illusionistic effect Dundas was channelling (body tattoos of dragons and tigers emerging onto the skin through the veiling) worked on the all white variations, but less so on the later veiled looks. The best pieces of the collection however, were the embroidered bomber jacket as well as a structured army kimono, that was covered in whimsical embroidered flight destinations on its rear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Marni

There will be many ways to peek through clothes next summer given fashion's craze for sheer dressing. But Marni opted for a method we at Wallpaper* could especially appreciate: windowpane checks. The architectural plaids featured sheer squares trimmed in black, red or blue that served as peep holes to the skin. This might seem a recipe for über-lightness, but creative director Consuelo Castiglioni actually seemed more interested in how to stiffen sporty summer fabrics so they stand away from the body rather than drape along its natural contours. Double-faced cotton, for example, had the corporeal structure of aluminium foil, allowing rigid waves on bustled skirts to stand out like stiff couture satins. A bunny-ear pink leather skirt and boxy pine-green leather top, meanwhile, seemed able to stand up on their own without the props of the model's pin legs.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Marni

There will be many ways to peek through clothes next summer given fashion's craze for sheer dressing. But Marni opted for a method we at Wallpaper* could especially appreciate: windowpane checks. The architectural plaids featured sheer squares trimmed in black, red or blue that served as peep holes to the skin. This might seem a recipe for über-lightness, but creative director Consuelo Castiglioni actually seemed more interested in how to stiffen sporty summer fabrics so they stand away from the body rather than drape along its natural contours. Double-faced cotton, for example, had the corporeal structure of aluminium foil, allowing rigid waves on bustled skirts to stand out like stiff couture satins. A bunny-ear pink leather skirt and boxy pine-green leather top, meanwhile, seemed able to stand up on their own without the props of the model's pin legs.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Marni

There will be many ways to peek through clothes next summer given fashion's craze for sheer dressing. But Marni opted for a method we at Wallpaper* could especially appreciate: windowpane checks. The architectural plaids featured sheer squares trimmed in black, red or blue that served as peep holes to the skin. This might seem a recipe for über-lightness, but creative director Consuelo Castiglioni actually seemed more interested in how to stiffen sporty summer fabrics so they stand away from the body rather than drape along its natural contours. Double-faced cotton, for example, had the corporeal structure of aluminium foil, allowing rigid waves on bustled skirts to stand out like stiff couture satins. A bunny-ear pink leather skirt and boxy pine-green leather top, meanwhile, seemed able to stand up on their own without the props of the model's pin legs.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Marni

There will be many ways to peek through clothes next summer given fashion's craze for sheer dressing. But Marni opted for a method we at Wallpaper* could especially appreciate: windowpane checks. The architectural plaids featured sheer squares trimmed in black, red or blue that served as peep holes to the skin. This might seem a recipe for über-lightness, but creative director Consuelo Castiglioni actually seemed more interested in how to stiffen sporty summer fabrics so they stand away from the body rather than drape along its natural contours. Double-faced cotton, for example, had the corporeal structure of aluminium foil, allowing rigid waves on bustled skirts to stand out like stiff couture satins. A bunny-ear pink leather skirt and boxy pine-green leather top, meanwhile, seemed able to stand up on their own without the props of the model's pin legs.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Marni

There will be many ways to peek through clothes next summer given fashion's craze for sheer dressing. But Marni opted for a method we at Wallpaper* could especially appreciate: windowpane checks. The architectural plaids featured sheer squares trimmed in black, red or blue that served as peep holes to the skin. This might seem a recipe for über-lightness, but creative director Consuelo Castiglioni actually seemed more interested in how to stiffen sporty summer fabrics so they stand away from the body rather than drape along its natural contours. Double-faced cotton, for example, had the corporeal structure of aluminium foil, allowing rigid waves on bustled skirts to stand out like stiff couture satins. A bunny-ear pink leather skirt and boxy pine-green leather top, meanwhile, seemed able to stand up on their own without the props of the model's pin legs.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Marni

There will be many ways to peek through clothes next summer given fashion's craze for sheer dressing. But Marni opted for a method we at Wallpaper* could especially appreciate: windowpane checks. The architectural plaids featured sheer squares trimmed in black, red or blue that served as peep holes to the skin. This might seem a recipe for über-lightness, but creative director Consuelo Castiglioni actually seemed more interested in how to stiffen sporty summer fabrics so they stand away from the body rather than drape along its natural contours. Double-faced cotton, for example, had the corporeal structure of aluminium foil, allowing rigid waves on bustled skirts to stand out like stiff couture satins. A bunny-ear pink leather skirt and boxy pine-green leather top, meanwhile, seemed able to stand up on their own without the props of the model's pin legs.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

Umit Benan saw a New York City rooftop barbecue as the setting for his Spring collection at Trussardi. Accordingly, his models rose high above city grit, possessing a decidedly polished air. There was nothing here a 'rebellious spirit' would actually wear to a Sunday afternoon cookout, but no matter - there were plenty of clothes for almost any other occasion. Like a razor-sharp boot-cut pant in rust or cornflower blue and mannish suiting in all shades of yellow, from sunshine and buttercup to pale butter. We liked the inventive plays on exotic skins, like the oversized python pocket on a feminine silk shirt and the python apron that wrapped around the front of a pair of blue taffeta shorts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

Umit Benan saw a New York City rooftop barbecue as the setting for his Spring collection at Trussardi. Accordingly, his models rose high above city grit, possessing a decidedly polished air. There was nothing here a 'rebellious spirit' would actually wear to a Sunday afternoon cookout, but no matter - there were plenty of clothes for almost any other occasion. Like a razor-sharp boot-cut pant in rust or cornflower blue and mannish suiting in all shades of yellow, from sunshine and buttercup to pale butter. We liked the inventive plays on exotic skins, like the oversized python pocket on a feminine silk shirt and the python apron that wrapped around the front of a pair of blue taffeta shorts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

Umit Benan saw a New York City rooftop barbecue as the setting for his Spring collection at Trussardi. Accordingly, his models rose high above city grit, possessing a decidedly polished air. There was nothing here a 'rebellious spirit' would actually wear to a Sunday afternoon cookout, but no matter - there were plenty of clothes for almost any other occasion. Like a razor-sharp boot-cut pant in rust or cornflower blue and mannish suiting in all shades of yellow, from sunshine and buttercup to pale butter. We liked the inventive plays on exotic skins, like the oversized python pocket on a feminine silk shirt and the python apron that wrapped around the front of a pair of blue taffeta shorts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

Umit Benan saw a New York City rooftop barbecue as the setting for his Spring collection at Trussardi. Accordingly, his models rose high above city grit, possessing a decidedly polished air. There was nothing here a 'rebellious spirit' would actually wear to a Sunday afternoon cookout, but no matter - there were plenty of clothes for almost any other occasion. Like a razor-sharp boot-cut pant in rust or cornflower blue and mannish suiting in all shades of yellow, from sunshine and buttercup to pale butter. We liked the inventive plays on exotic skins, like the oversized python pocket on a feminine silk shirt and the python apron that wrapped around the front of a pair of blue taffeta shorts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

Umit Benan saw a New York City rooftop barbecue as the setting for his Spring collection at Trussardi. Accordingly, his models rose high above city grit, possessing a decidedly polished air. There was nothing here a 'rebellious spirit' would actually wear to a Sunday afternoon cookout, but no matter - there were plenty of clothes for almost any other occasion. Like a razor-sharp boot-cut pant in rust or cornflower blue and mannish suiting in all shades of yellow, from sunshine and buttercup to pale butter. We liked the inventive plays on exotic skins, like the oversized python pocket on a feminine silk shirt and the python apron that wrapped around the front of a pair of blue taffeta shorts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Missoni

Angela Missoni's Spring collection gave new meaning to the term 'hot lips'. The models' mouths were coloured in a wild shade of neon while their hair was shellacked with gel to the ears, leaving wild manes to burst out naturally below. The spunky grooming regime was boosted with recherché accessories like rock-ice crystal jewellery and clear visors that looked like windshields. That latter was a nod to the collection's peek-a-boo game, where prints and patterns unfolded under knitted nettings, stretchy cobwebs and sheer overlays.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Missoni

Angela Missoni's Spring collection gave new meaning to the term 'hot lips'. The models' mouths were coloured in a wild shade of neon while their hair was shellacked with gel to the ears, leaving wild manes to burst out naturally below. The spunky grooming regime was boosted with recherché accessories like rock-ice crystal jewellery and clear visors that looked like windshields. That latter was a nod to the collection's peek-a-boo game, where prints and patterns unfolded under knitted nettings, stretchy cobwebs and sheer overlays.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Missoni

Angela Missoni's Spring collection gave new meaning to the term 'hot lips'. The models' mouths were coloured in a wild shade of neon while their hair was shellacked with gel to the ears, leaving wild manes to burst out naturally below. The spunky grooming regime was boosted with recherché accessories like rock-ice crystal jewellery and clear visors that looked like windshields. That latter was a nod to the collection's peek-a-boo game, where prints and patterns unfolded under knitted nettings, stretchy cobwebs and sheer overlays.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Missoni

Angela Missoni's Spring collection gave new meaning to the term 'hot lips'. The models' mouths were coloured in a wild shade of neon while their hair was shellacked with gel to the ears, leaving wild manes to burst out naturally below. The spunky grooming regime was boosted with recherché accessories like rock-ice crystal jewellery and clear visors that looked like windshields. That latter was a nod to the collection's peek-a-boo game, where prints and patterns unfolded under knitted nettings, stretchy cobwebs and sheer overlays.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Missoni

Angela Missoni's Spring collection gave new meaning to the term 'hot lips'. The models' mouths were coloured in a wild shade of neon while their hair was shellacked with gel to the ears, leaving wild manes to burst out naturally below. The spunky grooming regime was boosted with recherché accessories like rock-ice crystal jewellery and clear visors that looked like windshields. That latter was a nod to the collection's peek-a-boo game, where prints and patterns unfolded under knitted nettings, stretchy cobwebs and sheer overlays.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

Tight, taut, laced with saucy leather and studded with metal rivets - Ferragamo creative director Massimiliano Giometti took a sharp turn off his smoothly paved road of ladylike dressing onto a rockier and raunchier avenue altogether. Not that there was anything outrageously vulgar, but it was hard to deny the scent of soft bondage wafting off the clothes. It'll be interesting to see how many of Ferragamo's straight-laced customers will be strapping themselves into what the Florentine brand is proposing for Spring footwear: a high-heeled boot or leather gladiator sandal reaching up to the knees, the back of which has more lacing than an 18th-century corset. For lunch on via Montenapoleone there were laced jacquard trousers and tailored jackets in leather, suede and python. Let's hope the air conditioning works.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

Tight, taut, laced with saucy leather and studded with metal rivets - Ferragamo creative director Massimiliano Giometti took a sharp turn off his smoothly paved road of ladylike dressing onto a rockier and raunchier avenue altogether. Not that there was anything outrageously vulgar, but it was hard to deny the scent of soft bondage wafting off the clothes. It'll be interesting to see how many of Ferragamo's straight-laced customers will be strapping themselves into what the Florentine brand is proposing for Spring footwear: a high-heeled boot or leather gladiator sandal reaching up to the knees, the back of which has more lacing than an 18th-century corset. For lunch on via Montenapoleone there were laced jacquard trousers and tailored jackets in leather, suede and python. Let's hope the air conditioning works.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

Tight, taut, laced with saucy leather and studded with metal rivets - Ferragamo creative director Massimiliano Giometti took a sharp turn off his smoothly paved road of ladylike dressing onto a rockier and raunchier avenue altogether. Not that there was anything outrageously vulgar, but it was hard to deny the scent of soft bondage wafting off the clothes. It'll be interesting to see how many of Ferragamo's straight-laced customers will be strapping themselves into what the Florentine brand is proposing for Spring footwear: a high-heeled boot or leather gladiator sandal reaching up to the knees, the back of which has more lacing than an 18th-century corset. For lunch on via Montenapoleone there were laced jacquard trousers and tailored jackets in leather, suede and python. Let's hope the air conditioning works.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

Tight, taut, laced with saucy leather and studded with metal rivets - Ferragamo creative director Massimiliano Giometti took a sharp turn off his smoothly paved road of ladylike dressing onto a rockier and raunchier avenue altogether. Not that there was anything outrageously vulgar, but it was hard to deny the scent of soft bondage wafting off the clothes. It'll be interesting to see how many of Ferragamo's straight-laced customers will be strapping themselves into what the Florentine brand is proposing for Spring footwear: a high-heeled boot or leather gladiator sandal reaching up to the knees, the back of which has more lacing than an 18th-century corset. For lunch on via Montenapoleone there were laced jacquard trousers and tailored jackets in leather, suede and python. Let's hope the air conditioning works.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

Tight, taut, laced with saucy leather and studded with metal rivets - Ferragamo creative director Massimiliano Giometti took a sharp turn off his smoothly paved road of ladylike dressing onto a rockier and raunchier avenue altogether. Not that there was anything outrageously vulgar, but it was hard to deny the scent of soft bondage wafting off the clothes. It'll be interesting to see how many of Ferragamo's straight-laced customers will be strapping themselves into what the Florentine brand is proposing for Spring footwear: a high-heeled boot or leather gladiator sandal reaching up to the knees, the back of which has more lacing than an 18th-century corset. For lunch on via Montenapoleone there were laced jacquard trousers and tailored jackets in leather, suede and python. Let's hope the air conditioning works.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Giorgio Armani

Giorgio Armani has always been concerned with the sensual way fabric can move around the body to enhance its contours and flatter its natural shape. Typically, the fabrics he employs for this pursuit possess a certain slinkiness. Not so for Spring. The Milanese maestro pulled out stiff gossamer silk and organza - typical couture fare - to create tailored suiting options. This meant that three-quarter-length coats, cropped jackets and wide, ankle-length trousers (even the sheer ones) stood away from the body and insisted on their own life apart from it. Pearl-grey and steely cloud-blues were minimalist options for day, but come nightfall Armani shot up the sky with a fireworks display of crystal beading.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Giorgio Armani

Giorgio Armani has always been concerned with the sensual way fabric can move around the body to enhance its contours and flatter its natural shape. Typically, the fabrics he employs for this pursuit possess a certain slinkiness. Not so for Spring. The Milanese maestro pulled out stiff gossamer silk and organza - typical couture fare - to create tailored suiting options. This meant that three-quarter-length coats, cropped jackets and wide, ankle-length trousers (even the sheer ones) stood away from the body and insisted on their own life apart from it. Pearl-grey and steely cloud-blues were minimalist options for day, but come nightfall Armani shot up the sky with a fireworks display of crystal beading.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Giorgio Armani

Giorgio Armani has always been concerned with the sensual way fabric can move around the body to enhance its contours and flatter its natural shape. Typically, the fabrics he employs for this pursuit possess a certain slinkiness. Not so for Spring. The Milanese maestro pulled out stiff gossamer silk and organza - typical couture fare - to create tailored suiting options. This meant that three-quarter-length coats, cropped jackets and wide, ankle-length trousers (even the sheer ones) stood away from the body and insisted on their own life apart from it. Pearl-grey and steely cloud-blues were minimalist options for day, but come nightfall Armani shot up the sky with a fireworks display of crystal beading.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Giorgio Armani

Giorgio Armani has always been concerned with the sensual way fabric can move around the body to enhance its contours and flatter its natural shape. Typically, the fabrics he employs for this pursuit possess a certain slinkiness. Not so for Spring. The Milanese maestro pulled out stiff gossamer silk and organza - typical couture fare - to create tailored suiting options. This meant that three-quarter-length coats, cropped jackets and wide, ankle-length trousers (even the sheer ones) stood away from the body and insisted on their own life apart from it. Pearl-grey and steely cloud-blues were minimalist options for day, but come nightfall Armani shot up the sky with a fireworks display of crystal beading.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Giorgio Armani

Giorgio Armani has always been concerned with the sensual way fabric can move around the body to enhance its contours and flatter its natural shape. Typically, the fabrics he employs for this pursuit possess a certain slinkiness. Not so for Spring. The Milanese maestro pulled out stiff gossamer silk and organza - typical couture fare - to create tailored suiting options. This meant that three-quarter-length coats, cropped jackets and wide, ankle-length trousers (even the sheer ones) stood away from the body and insisted on their own life apart from it. Pearl-grey and steely cloud-blues were minimalist options for day, but come nightfall Armani shot up the sky with a fireworks display of crystal beading.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Gucci

The last time we saw metal-heavy 3D embellishment on the Gucci runway Frida Giannini was having her techno ikat moment.  Three years later both Gucci's Creative Director and her design sensibilities have matured considerably. Now the decoration comes in a prim womanly form with clusters of coloured costume jewels trimming the necks of colour pop tunics and floor-grazing gowns. High-wattage rocks were but one of many details that oriented the collection into the sphere of the swinging 1960s. There were whiffs of the leisure suit in the lean tunic tops worn over skinny straight pants, and a couture-like flair on the bell sleeves and the simple silk organza dresses trimmed in waves of paper-thin ruffles. The basic shapes and clean lines got jazzed up in buckets of solid colour - think raspberry sorbet, acid lemon, peach, grass green, pool blue and turquoise - all of which are antidotes to day job depression.
 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin


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