Eudon Choi

Retro-futurism was on the brain for Eudon Choi, who called his collection 'Space Oddity', a play on the space-obsessed Bowie of the 1960s and Stanley Kubrick’s cinematic classic ‘2001’. On the runway, Choi reinterpreted the ’60s interpretation of the new millennium, bringing a contemporary hand to the clean lines and shift-shapes of the era. And remember Veruschka, the beautiful seductress who made love to David Thomas's camera during a fashion shoot in Antonioni’s ‘Blow-Up’? Well the iconic 1960s model was at the fore of Choi's mind, too. Her mod vibe lent itself to sleek cocoon coats, cigarette pants, geometric block patterns and shiny PVC leathers, deftly cut into oversized boxy tops and jackets. This may be just the second on-schedule London Fashion Week show for the Korean-born designer, but if his fashion-forward collection is anything to go by, his future's looking bright.

Photography: Christopher Dadey; Words: Apphia Michael

Eudon Choi

Retro-futurism was on the brain for Eudon Choi, who called his collection 'Space Oddity', a play on the space-obsessed Bowie of the 1960s and Stanley Kubrick’s cinematic classic ‘2001’. On the runway, Choi reinterpreted the ’60s interpretation of the new millennium, bringing a contemporary hand to the clean lines and shift-shapes of the era. And remember Veruschka, the beautiful seductress who made love to David Thomas's camera during a fashion shoot in Antonioni’s ‘Blow-Up’? Well the iconic 1960s model was at the fore of Choi's mind, too. Her mod vibe lent itself to sleek cocoon coats, cigarette pants, geometric block patterns and shiny PVC leathers, deftly cut into oversized boxy tops and jackets. This may be just the second on-schedule London Fashion Week show for the Korean-born designer, but if his fashion-forward collection is anything to go by, his future's looking bright.

Photography: Christopher Dadey; Words: Apphia Michael

Eudon Choi

Retro-futurism was on the brain for Eudon Choi, who called his collection 'Space Oddity', a play on the space-obsessed Bowie of the 1960s and Stanley Kubrick’s cinematic classic ‘2001’. On the runway, Choi reinterpreted the ’60s interpretation of the new millennium, bringing a contemporary hand to the clean lines and shift-shapes of the era. And remember Veruschka, the beautiful seductress who made love to David Thomas's camera during a fashion shoot in Antonioni’s ‘Blow-Up’? Well the iconic 1960s model was at the fore of Choi's mind, too. Her mod vibe lent itself to sleek cocoon coats, cigarette pants, geometric block patterns and shiny PVC leathers, deftly cut into oversized boxy tops and jackets. This may be just the second on-schedule London Fashion Week show for the Korean-born designer, but if his fashion-forward collection is anything to go by, his future's looking bright.

Photography: Christopher Dadey; Words: Apphia Michael

Eudon Choi

Retro-futurism was on the brain for Eudon Choi, who called his collection 'Space Oddity', a play on the space-obsessed Bowie of the 1960s and Stanley Kubrick’s cinematic classic ‘2001’. On the runway, Choi reinterpreted the ’60s interpretation of the new millennium, bringing a contemporary hand to the clean lines and shift-shapes of the era. And remember Veruschka, the beautiful seductress who made love to David Thomas's camera during a fashion shoot in Antonioni’s ‘Blow-Up’? Well the iconic 1960s model was at the fore of Choi's mind, too. Her mod vibe lent itself to sleek cocoon coats, cigarette pants, geometric block patterns and shiny PVC leathers, deftly cut into oversized boxy tops and jackets. This may be just the second on-schedule London Fashion Week show for the Korean-born designer, but if his fashion-forward collection is anything to go by, his future's looking bright.

Photography: Christopher Dadey; Words: Apphia Michael

Eudon Choi

Retro-futurism was on the brain for Eudon Choi, who called his collection 'Space Oddity', a play on the space-obsessed Bowie of the 1960s and Stanley Kubrick’s cinematic classic ‘2001’. On the runway, Choi reinterpreted the ’60s interpretation of the new millennium, bringing a contemporary hand to the clean lines and shift-shapes of the era. And remember Veruschka, the beautiful seductress who made love to David Thomas's camera during a fashion shoot in Antonioni’s ‘Blow-Up’? Well the iconic 1960s model was at the fore of Choi's mind, too. Her mod vibe lent itself to sleek cocoon coats, cigarette pants, geometric block patterns and shiny PVC leathers, deftly cut into oversized boxy tops and jackets. This may be just the second on-schedule London Fashion Week show for the Korean-born designer, but if his fashion-forward collection is anything to go by, his future's looking bright.

Photography: Christopher Dadey; Words: Apphia Michael

Kinder Aggugini

Kinder Aggugini took the preppy, print-adorned offbeat schoolgirl who ruled his A/W 2012 catwalk out of the classroom and gave her a summer holiday. The inspiration may have been Hemingway's 'The Old Man and the Sea', but this was more girlie seaside chic than the sort of gear an ageing fisherman would need to go into battle with a giant marlin. Dreamy, fluid pinafores and dungarees came down the runway thick and fast, peppered with a mash-up of blue gingham and island map-prints, and paired with fisherman clog-inspired Hasbeens. The seascape-inspired pleated paper-bag skirts and the blue dip-dyed broderie anglaise - applied most effectively on a short shift - worked well, but the winners were the florals and the paisley-like patterns, which on closer inspection revealed a whole universe of sea creatures and maritime symbols.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Kinder Aggugini

Kinder Aggugini took the preppy, print-adorned offbeat schoolgirl who ruled his A/W 2012 catwalk out of the classroom and gave her a summer holiday. The inspiration may have been Hemingway's 'The Old Man and the Sea', but this was more girlie seaside chic than the sort of gear an ageing fisherman would need to go into battle with a giant marlin. Dreamy, fluid pinafores and dungarees came down the runway thick and fast, peppered with a mash-up of blue gingham and island map-prints, and paired with fisherman clog-inspired Hasbeens. The seascape-inspired pleated paper-bag skirts and the blue dip-dyed broderie anglaise - applied most effectively on a short shift - worked well, but the winners were the florals and the paisley-like patterns, which on closer inspection revealed a whole universe of sea creatures and maritime symbols.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Kinder Aggugini

Kinder Aggugini took the preppy, print-adorned offbeat schoolgirl who ruled his A/W 2012 catwalk out of the classroom and gave her a summer holiday. The inspiration may have been Hemingway's 'The Old Man and the Sea', but this was more girlie seaside chic than the sort of gear an ageing fisherman would need to go into battle with a giant marlin. Dreamy, fluid pinafores and dungarees came down the runway thick and fast, peppered with a mash-up of blue gingham and island map-prints, and paired with fisherman clog-inspired Hasbeens. The seascape-inspired pleated paper-bag skirts and the blue dip-dyed broderie anglaise - applied most effectively on a short shift - worked well, but the winners were the florals and the paisley-like patterns, which on closer inspection revealed a whole universe of sea creatures and maritime symbols.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Kinder Aggugini

Kinder Aggugini took the preppy, print-adorned offbeat schoolgirl who ruled his A/W 2012 catwalk out of the classroom and gave her a summer holiday. The inspiration may have been Hemingway's 'The Old Man and the Sea', but this was more girlie seaside chic than the sort of gear an ageing fisherman would need to go into battle with a giant marlin. Dreamy, fluid pinafores and dungarees came down the runway thick and fast, peppered with a mash-up of blue gingham and island map-prints, and paired with fisherman clog-inspired Hasbeens. The seascape-inspired pleated paper-bag skirts and the blue dip-dyed broderie anglaise - applied most effectively on a short shift - worked well, but the winners were the florals and the paisley-like patterns, which on closer inspection revealed a whole universe of sea creatures and maritime symbols.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Kinder Aggugini

Kinder Aggugini took the preppy, print-adorned offbeat schoolgirl who ruled his A/W 2012 catwalk out of the classroom and gave her a summer holiday. The inspiration may have been Hemingway's 'The Old Man and the Sea', but this was more girlie seaside chic than the sort of gear an ageing fisherman would need to go into battle with a giant marlin. Dreamy, fluid pinafores and dungarees came down the runway thick and fast, peppered with a mash-up of blue gingham and island map-prints, and paired with fisherman clog-inspired Hasbeens. The seascape-inspired pleated paper-bag skirts and the blue dip-dyed broderie anglaise - applied most effectively on a short shift - worked well, but the winners were the florals and the paisley-like patterns, which on closer inspection revealed a whole universe of sea creatures and maritime symbols.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Margaret Howell

For Spring 2013 Margaret Howell seemed to wind the clock back a few decades and Channel-hop to New Wave Paris: boatneck patch-pocket tops, culottes and overalls seemed more Jean Seberg than Jean Shrimpton. But within her space on Wigmore Street, the collection felt tight, crisp and contemporary. For Howell, perfection takes precedence over experimentation. Her roomy shirtdresses are an antithesis to the LBD but just as essential. And her rejection of the prints and bold colours that define London fashion today means that the roomy blazers, cropped pants and blunt-edged shirts look fresh or, better yet, soigné.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Margaret Howell

For Spring 2013 Margaret Howell seemed to wind the clock back a few decades and Channel-hop to New Wave Paris: boatneck patch-pocket tops, culottes and overalls seemed more Jean Seberg than Jean Shrimpton. But within her space on Wigmore Street, the collection felt tight, crisp and contemporary. For Howell, perfection takes precedence over experimentation. Her roomy shirtdresses are an antithesis to the LBD but just as essential. And her rejection of the prints and bold colours that define London fashion today means that the roomy blazers, cropped pants and blunt-edged shirts look fresh or, better yet, soigné.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Margaret Howell

For Spring 2013 Margaret Howell seemed to wind the clock back a few decades and Channel-hop to New Wave Paris: boatneck patch-pocket tops, culottes and overalls seemed more Jean Seberg than Jean Shrimpton. But within her space on Wigmore Street, the collection felt tight, crisp and contemporary. For Howell, perfection takes precedence over experimentation. Her roomy shirtdresses are an antithesis to the LBD but just as essential. And her rejection of the prints and bold colours that define London fashion today means that the roomy blazers, cropped pants and blunt-edged shirts look fresh or, better yet, soigné.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Margaret Howell

For Spring 2013 Margaret Howell seemed to wind the clock back a few decades and Channel-hop to New Wave Paris: boatneck patch-pocket tops, culottes and overalls seemed more Jean Seberg than Jean Shrimpton. But within her space on Wigmore Street, the collection felt tight, crisp and contemporary. For Howell, perfection takes precedence over experimentation. Her roomy shirtdresses are an antithesis to the LBD but just as essential. And her rejection of the prints and bold colours that define London fashion today means that the roomy blazers, cropped pants and blunt-edged shirts look fresh or, better yet, soigné.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Margaret Howell

For Spring 2013 Margaret Howell seemed to wind the clock back a few decades and Channel-hop to New Wave Paris: boatneck patch-pocket tops, culottes and overalls seemed more Jean Seberg than Jean Shrimpton. But within her space on Wigmore Street, the collection felt tight, crisp and contemporary. For Howell, perfection takes precedence over experimentation. Her roomy shirtdresses are an antithesis to the LBD but just as essential. And her rejection of the prints and bold colours that define London fashion today means that the roomy blazers, cropped pants and blunt-edged shirts look fresh or, better yet, soigné.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Marios Schwab

If bees can produce something as structurally complex as a honeycomb, reasoning would follow that a skilled designer can produce something comparatively complex. Was this the case with Marios Schwab, who used the hexagonal motif as his starting point? Mostly, yes, and certainly to the extent that he manipulated leather into papery pleating. Likewise when he reduced nature’s most recognisable hexagon to a geometric pattern, or interpreted it as a silhouette in lace as a sweater inlay. Schwab's interest in celebrating the traditions of ancient tribes proved a less consistent analogy; at times, the raffia detailing seemed overworked. And the beaded Swarovski harnesses introduced one element too many.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Marios Schwab

If bees can produce something as structurally complex as a honeycomb, reasoning would follow that a skilled designer can produce something comparatively complex. Was this the case with Marios Schwab, who used the hexagonal motif as his starting point? Mostly, yes, and certainly to the extent that he manipulated leather into papery pleating. Likewise when he reduced nature’s most recognisable hexagon to a geometric pattern, or interpreted it as a silhouette in lace as a sweater inlay. Schwab's interest in celebrating the traditions of ancient tribes proved a less consistent analogy; at times, the raffia detailing seemed overworked. And the beaded Swarovski harnesses introduced one element too many.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Marios Schwab

If bees can produce something as structurally complex as a honeycomb, reasoning would follow that a skilled designer can produce something comparatively complex. Was this the case with Marios Schwab, who used the hexagonal motif as his starting point? Mostly, yes, and certainly to the extent that he manipulated leather into papery pleating. Likewise when he reduced nature’s most recognisable hexagon to a geometric pattern, or interpreted it as a silhouette in lace as a sweater inlay. Schwab's interest in celebrating the traditions of ancient tribes proved a less consistent analogy; at times, the raffia detailing seemed overworked. And the beaded Swarovski harnesses introduced one element too many.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Marios Schwab

If bees can produce something as structurally complex as a honeycomb, reasoning would follow that a skilled designer can produce something comparatively complex. Was this the case with Marios Schwab, who used the hexagonal motif as his starting point? Mostly, yes, and certainly to the extent that he manipulated leather into papery pleating. Likewise when he reduced nature’s most recognisable hexagon to a geometric pattern, or interpreted it as a silhouette in lace as a sweater inlay. Schwab's interest in celebrating the traditions of ancient tribes proved a less consistent analogy; at times, the raffia detailing seemed overworked. And the beaded Swarovski harnesses introduced one element too many.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Marios Schwab

If bees can produce something as structurally complex as a honeycomb, reasoning would follow that a skilled designer can produce something comparatively complex. Was this the case with Marios Schwab, who used the hexagonal motif as his starting point? Mostly, yes, and certainly to the extent that he manipulated leather into papery pleating. Likewise when he reduced nature’s most recognisable hexagon to a geometric pattern, or interpreted it as a silhouette in lace as a sweater inlay. Schwab's interest in celebrating the traditions of ancient tribes proved a less consistent analogy; at times, the raffia detailing seemed overworked. And the beaded Swarovski harnesses introduced one element too many.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Vivienne Westwood Red Label

The tea dresses and twinsets Vivienne Westwood presented as part of her Red Label Collection (Gold shows in Paris) were entirely ladylike; it was the micro-minis that provided the requisite dose of cheek. Westwood covered all the print bases: faded candy stripes, dainty florals, upholstery patterns, even an abstract multicoloured medley that looked like a Gerhardt Richter canvas. But the most dramatic statement of all was neither the models’ pastel-painted faces nor the golf ball-sized pearls. It was Westwood herself, who appeared in tattered pantyhose and knickers, swathed in a Climate Revolution banner that underscored the manifesto she’d left on the audience seats. Indeed, this went beyond fashion forward.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Vivienne Westwood Red Label

The tea dresses and twinsets Vivienne Westwood presented as part of her Red Label Collection (Gold shows in Paris) were entirely ladylike; it was the micro-minis that provided the requisite dose of cheek. Westwood covered all the print bases: faded candy stripes, dainty florals, upholstery patterns, even an abstract multicoloured medley that looked like a Gerhardt Richter canvas. But the most dramatic statement of all was neither the models’ pastel-painted faces nor the golf ball-sized pearls. It was Westwood herself, who appeared in tattered pantyhose and knickers, swathed in a Climate Revolution banner that underscored the manifesto she’d left on the audience seats. Indeed, this went beyond fashion forward.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Vivienne Westwood Red Label

The tea dresses and twinsets Vivienne Westwood presented as part of her Red Label Collection (Gold shows in Paris) were entirely ladylike; it was the micro-minis that provided the requisite dose of cheek. Westwood covered all the print bases: faded candy stripes, dainty florals, upholstery patterns, even an abstract multicoloured medley that looked like a Gerhardt Richter canvas. But the most dramatic statement of all was neither the models’ pastel-painted faces nor the golf ball-sized pearls. It was Westwood herself, who appeared in tattered pantyhose and knickers, swathed in a Climate Revolution banner that underscored the manifesto she’d left on the audience seats. Indeed, this went beyond fashion forward.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Vivienne Westwood Red Label

The tea dresses and twinsets Vivienne Westwood presented as part of her Red Label Collection (Gold shows in Paris) were entirely ladylike; it was the micro-minis that provided the requisite dose of cheek. Westwood covered all the print bases: faded candy stripes, dainty florals, upholstery patterns, even an abstract multicoloured medley that looked like a Gerhardt Richter canvas. But the most dramatic statement of all was neither the models’ pastel-painted faces nor the golf ball-sized pearls. It was Westwood herself, who appeared in tattered pantyhose and knickers, swathed in a Climate Revolution banner that underscored the manifesto she’d left on the audience seats. Indeed, this went beyond fashion forward.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Vivienne Westwood Red Label

The tea dresses and twinsets Vivienne Westwood presented as part of her Red Label Collection (Gold shows in Paris) were entirely ladylike; it was the micro-minis that provided the requisite dose of cheek. Westwood covered all the print bases: faded candy stripes, dainty florals, upholstery patterns, even an abstract multicoloured medley that looked like a Gerhardt Richter canvas. But the most dramatic statement of all was neither the models’ pastel-painted faces nor the golf ball-sized pearls. It was Westwood herself, who appeared in tattered pantyhose and knickers, swathed in a Climate Revolution banner that underscored the manifesto she’d left on the audience seats. Indeed, this went beyond fashion forward.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Acne

The buzz words at Acne were 'collage', 'music' and 'new'. Creative director Jonny Johansson cited them as the key elements of the creative process for Spring. So, as one would expect, the resulting collection was a mix of romantic silhouettes and street style, with hints of a Western theme (cue the cowboy hats). Leather is never far from an Acne cutting floor and this season it was veritably striped, cubed and collaged into form. A jockey-striped lilac and black leather jacket continued on from where the S/S 2013 menswear collection left off, but a refreshing addition came in the form of the coloured leather patchwork that dominated a couple of jackets and vests. Our prediction for next season's street style? The conceptually brilliant blowsy parachute skirts and dresses with utility straps on the sides.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Acne

The buzz words at Acne were 'collage', 'music' and 'new'. Creative director Jonny Johansson cited them as the key elements of the creative process for Spring. So, as one would expect, the resulting collection was a mix of romantic silhouettes and street style, with hints of a Western theme (cue the cowboy hats). Leather is never far from an Acne cutting floor and this season it was veritably striped, cubed and collaged into form. A jockey-striped lilac and black leather jacket continued on from where the S/S 2013 menswear collection left off, but a refreshing addition came in the form of the coloured leather patchwork that dominated a couple of jackets and vests. Our prediction for next season's street style? The conceptually brilliant blowsy parachute skirts and dresses with utility straps on the sides.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Acne

The buzz words at Acne were 'collage', 'music' and 'new'. Creative director Jonny Johansson cited them as the key elements of the creative process for Spring. So, as one would expect, the resulting collection was a mix of romantic silhouettes and street style, with hints of a Western theme (cue the cowboy hats). Leather is never far from an Acne cutting floor and this season it was veritably striped, cubed and collaged into form. A jockey-striped lilac and black leather jacket continued on from where the S/S 2013 menswear collection left off, but a refreshing addition came in the form of the coloured leather patchwork that dominated a couple of jackets and vests. Our prediction for next season's street style? The conceptually brilliant blowsy parachute skirts and dresses with utility straps on the sides.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Acne

The buzz words at Acne were 'collage', 'music' and 'new'. Creative director Jonny Johansson cited them as the key elements of the creative process for Spring. So, as one would expect, the resulting collection was a mix of romantic silhouettes and street style, with hints of a Western theme (cue the cowboy hats). Leather is never far from an Acne cutting floor and this season it was veritably striped, cubed and collaged into form. A jockey-striped lilac and black leather jacket continued on from where the S/S 2013 menswear collection left off, but a refreshing addition came in the form of the coloured leather patchwork that dominated a couple of jackets and vests. Our prediction for next season's street style? The conceptually brilliant blowsy parachute skirts and dresses with utility straps on the sides.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Acne

The buzz words at Acne were 'collage', 'music' and 'new'. Creative director Jonny Johansson cited them as the key elements of the creative process for Spring. So, as one would expect, the resulting collection was a mix of romantic silhouettes and street style, with hints of a Western theme (cue the cowboy hats). Leather is never far from an Acne cutting floor and this season it was veritably striped, cubed and collaged into form. A jockey-striped lilac and black leather jacket continued on from where the S/S 2013 menswear collection left off, but a refreshing addition came in the form of the coloured leather patchwork that dominated a couple of jackets and vests. Our prediction for next season's street style? The conceptually brilliant blowsy parachute skirts and dresses with utility straps on the sides.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Paul Smith

Colour, or more to the point: colour-blocking, was a big story on the Paul Smith catwalk this season. Trousers, silk dresses and skirts with provocative thigh-slits mined this aesthetic with strong reds, deep greens and black leading the way. Skirts were literally spliced in half with two different colours or prints, but the blocking extended past the obvious and into the more subtle realms of shirt collars and lapels, too. And while the designer mined the strong boyish-girl look he so loves, he juxtaposed this with floaty dresses and outfits embellished ever so slightly with chiffon and lace. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Paul Smith

Colour, or more to the point: colour-blocking, was a big story on the Paul Smith catwalk this season. Trousers, silk dresses and skirts with provocative thigh-slits mined this aesthetic with strong reds, deep greens and black leading the way. Smith was inspired by the work of artist Jean-Paul Goude and his graphic mix-and-match approach to colour and texture. Skirts were literally spliced in half with two different colours or prints, but the blocking extended past the obvious and into the more subtle realms of shirt collars and lapels, too. And while the designer mined the strong boyish-girl look he so loves, he juxtaposed this with floaty dresses and outfits embellished ever so slightly with chiffon and lace.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Paul Smith

Colour, or more to the point: colour-blocking, was a big story on the Paul Smith catwalk this season. Trousers, silk dresses and skirts with provocative thigh-slits mined this aesthetic with strong reds, deep greens and black leading the way. Smith was inspired by the work of artist Jean-Paul Goude and his graphic mix-and-match approach to colour and texture. Skirts were literally spliced in half with two different colours or prints, but the blocking extended past the obvious and into the more subtle realms of shirt collars and lapels, too. And while the designer mined the strong boyish-girl look he so loves, he juxtaposed this with floaty dresses and outfits embellished ever so slightly with chiffon and lace.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Paul Smith

Colour, or more to the point: colour-blocking, was a big story on the Paul Smith catwalk this season. Trousers, silk dresses and skirts with provocative thigh-slits mined this aesthetic with strong reds, deep greens and black leading the way. Smith was inspired by the work of artist Jean-Paul Goude and his graphic mix-and-match approach to colour and texture. Skirts were literally spliced in half with two different colours or prints, but the blocking extended past the obvious and into the more subtle realms of shirt collars and lapels, too. And while the designer mined the strong boyish-girl look he so loves, he juxtaposed this with floaty dresses and outfits embellished ever so slightly with chiffon and lace.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Paul Smith

Colour, or more to the point: colour-blocking, was a big story on the Paul Smith catwalk this season. Trousers, silk dresses and skirts with provocative thigh-slits mined this aesthetic with strong reds, deep greens and black leading the way. Smith was inspired by the work of artist Jean-Paul Goude and his graphic mix-and-match approach to colour and texture. Skirts were literally spliced in half with two different colours or prints, but the blocking extended past the obvious and into the more subtle realms of shirt collars and lapels, too. And while the designer mined the strong boyish-girl look he so loves, he juxtaposed this with floaty dresses and outfits embellished ever so slightly with chiffon and lace.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Paul Smith

Colour, or more to the point: colour-blocking, was a big story on the Paul Smith catwalk this season. Trousers, silk dresses and skirts with provocative thigh-slits mined this aesthetic with strong reds, deep greens and black leading the way. Smith was inspired by the work of artist Jean-Paul Goude and his graphic mix-and-match approach to colour and texture. Skirts were literally spliced in half with two different colours or prints, but the blocking extended past the obvious and into the more subtle realms of shirt collars and lapels, too. And while the designer mined the strong boyish-girl look he so loves, he juxtaposed this with floaty dresses and outfits embellished ever so slightly with chiffon and lace.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Mary Katrantzou

Every season London's Queen of Print has us wondering: what tableaux will she paint for us this time? Bank notes and postage stamps - unlikely starting points in anyone else’s hands - provided the perfect imagery for Mary Katrantzou, who mashed up designs from Venuezuela, Mongolia, Britain and Greece to electrify elongated, oversized-sleeve shirt-dresses, sleek trousers paired with blazers, voluminous swing dresses and metallic gowns in Swarovski crystal-mesh. The graphic narrative was broken into two stories: postage-stamp print for day, bank note for night. Sleeveless tops paired with below-the-knee skirts gave silhouettes a 1950s and 1960s flavour, with halter dresses, A-lines and shifts giving things a fresh, directional recharged feel for Spring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Mary Katrantzou

Every season London's Queen of Print has us wondering: what tableaux will she paint for us this time? Bank notes and postage stamps - unlikely starting points in anyone else’s hands - provided the perfect imagery for Mary Katrantzou, who mashed up designs from Venuezuela, Mongolia, Britain and Greece to electrify elongated, oversized-sleeve shirt-dresses, sleek trousers paired with blazers, voluminous swing dresses and metallic gowns in Swarovski crystal-mesh. The graphic narrative was broken into two stories: postage-stamp print for day, bank note for night. Sleeveless tops paired with below-the-knee skirts gave silhouettes a 1950s and 1960s flavour, with halter dresses, A-lines and shifts giving things a fresh, directional recharged feel for Spring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Mary Katrantzou

Every season London's Queen of Print has us wondering: what tableaux will she paint for us this time? Bank notes and postage stamps - unlikely starting points in anyone else’s hands - provided the perfect imagery for Mary Katrantzou, who mashed up designs from Venuezuela, Mongolia, Britain and Greece to electrify elongated, oversized-sleeve shirt-dresses, sleek trousers paired with blazers, voluminous swing dresses and metallic gowns in Swarovski crystal-mesh. The graphic narrative was broken into two stories: postage-stamp print for day, bank note for night. Sleeveless tops paired with below-the-knee skirts gave silhouettes a 1950s and 1960s flavour, with halter dresses, A-lines and shifts giving things a fresh, directional recharged feel for Spring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Mary Katrantzou

Every season London's Queen of Print has us wondering: what tableaux will she paint for us this time? Bank notes and postage stamps - unlikely starting points in anyone else’s hands - provided the perfect imagery for Mary Katrantzou, who mashed up designs from Venuezuela, Mongolia, Britain and Greece to electrify elongated, oversized-sleeve shirt-dresses, sleek trousers paired with blazers, voluminous swing dresses and metallic gowns in Swarovski crystal-mesh. The graphic narrative was broken into two stories: postage-stamp print for day, bank note for night. Sleeveless tops paired with below-the-knee skirts gave silhouettes a 1950s and 1960s flavour, with halter dresses, A-lines and shifts giving things a fresh, directional recharged feel for Spring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Mary Katrantzou

Every season London's Queen of Print has us wondering: what tableaux will she paint for us this time? Bank notes and postage stamps - unlikely starting points in anyone else’s hands - provided the perfect imagery for Mary Katrantzou, who mashed up designs from Venuezuela, Mongolia, Britain and Greece to electrify elongated, oversized-sleeve shirt-dresses, sleek trousers paired with blazers, voluminous swing dresses and metallic gowns in Swarovski crystal-mesh. The graphic narrative was broken into two stories: postage-stamp print for day, bank note for night. Sleeveless tops paired with below-the-knee skirts gave silhouettes a 1950s and 1960s flavour, with halter dresses, A-lines and shifts giving things a fresh, directional recharged feel for Spring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Jonathan Saunders

Maybe it was the eerie atmosphere of the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall at night, or the mass shuffling of feet into the dusky lobby of the new Tate Tanks. It could have been the angled mirrors that added a hint of a sparse (if arty) nightclub. In any case, when the stage lights came on and the first two looks came out - metallic pencil skirts in silver and gold - it was clear: Jonathan Saunders had put us in a disco mood. This wasn't the only reference the Scottish designer dished out. In honour, perhaps, of the gallery venue, he brought through a host of chunky Op Art swirls, colour-blocked on silk and sequined dresses. And his metallic foil stripes? They’ll surely be the new pattern for Spring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Jonathan Saunders

Maybe it was the eerie atmosphere of the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall at night, or the mass shuffling of feet into the dusky lobby of the new Tate Tanks. It could have been the angled mirrors that added a hint of a sparse (if arty) nightclub. In any case, when the stage lights came on and the first two looks came out - metallic pencil skirts in silver and gold - it was clear: Jonathan Saunders had put us in a disco mood. This wasn't the only reference the Scottish designer dished out. In honour, perhaps, of the gallery venue, he brought through a host of chunky Op Art swirls, colour-blocked on silk and sequined dresses. And his metallic foil stripes? They’ll surely be the new pattern for Spring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Jonathan Saunders

Maybe it was the eerie atmosphere of the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall at night, or the mass shuffling of feet into the dusky lobby of the new Tate Tanks. It could have been the angled mirrors that added a hint of a sparse (if arty) nightclub. In any case, when the stage lights came on and the first two looks came out - metallic pencil skirts in silver and gold - it was clear: Jonathan Saunders had put us in a disco mood. This wasn't the only reference the Scottish designer dished out. In honour, perhaps, of the gallery venue, he brought through a host of chunky Op Art swirls, colour-blocked on silk and sequined dresses. And his metallic foil stripes? They’ll surely be the new pattern for Spring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Jonathan Saunders

Maybe it was the eerie atmosphere of the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall at night, or the mass shuffling of feet into the dusky, lobby of the new Tate Tanks. It could have been the angled mirrors that added a hint of a sparse (if arty) nightclub. In any case, when the stage lights came on and the first two looks came out - metallic pencil skirts in silver and gold - it was clear: Jonathan Saunders had put us in a disco mood. This wasn't the only reference the Scottish designer dished out. In honour, perhaps, of the gallery venue, he brought through a host of chunky Op Art swirls, colour-blocked on silk and sequined dresses. And his metallic foil stripes? They’ll surely be the new pattern for Spring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Jonathan Saunders

Maybe it was the eerie atmosphere of the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall at night, or the mass shuffling of feet into the dusky, lobby of the new. It could have been the angled mirrors that added a hint of a sparse (if arty) nightclub. In any case, when the stage lights came on and the first two looks came out - metallic pencil skirts in silver and gold - it was clear: Jonathan Saunders had put us in a disco mood. This wasn't the only reference the Scottish designer dished out. In honour, perhaps, of the gallery venue, he brought through a host of chunky Op Art swirls, colour-blocked on silk and sequined dresses. And his metallic foil stripes? They’ll surely be the new pattern for Spring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Pringle of Scotland

When creative director Alistair Carr departed in April, Pringle of Scotland announced it was retracing its steps to the heart of its roots, knitwear. Eschewing the catwalk in favour of more intimate presentation setting in the Roosevelt suite at Brown's Hotel this season, the label cited its 1950s 'sweater girls' as inspiration for Spring. The push and pull that was seen in the textural narrative - embellishment splicing into clean tailoring and lightweight cashmere mixes - was also evident in the balance between the sugary sweet pastel hues of mint, lemon and powdery pink and the vibrant injection of cobalt blue and sea green hues.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Pringle of Scotland

When creative director Alistair Carr departed in April, Pringle of Scotland announced it was retracing its steps to the heart of its roots, knitwear. Eschewing the catwalk in favour of more intimate presentation setting in the Roosevelt suite at Brown's Hotel this season, the label cited its 1950s 'sweater girls' as inspiration for Spring. The push and pull that was seen in the textural narrative - embellishment splicing into clean tailoring and lightweight cashmere mixes - was also evident in the balance between the sugary sweet pastel hues of mint, lemon and powdery pink and the vibrant injection of cobalt blue and sea green hues.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Pringle of Scotland

When creative director Alistair Carr departed in April, Pringle of Scotland announced it was retracing its steps to the heart of its roots, knitwear. Eschewing the catwalk in favour of more intimate presentation setting in the Roosevelt suite at Brown's Hotel this season, the label cited its 1950s 'sweater girls' as inspiration for Spring. The push and pull that was seen in the textural narrative - embellishment splicing into clean tailoring and lightweight cashmere mixes - was also evident in the balance between the sugary sweet pastel hues of mint, lemon and powdery pink and the vibrant injection of cobalt blue and sea green hues.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Pringle of Scotland

When creative director Alistair Carr departed in April, Pringle of Scotland announced it was retracing its steps to the heart of its roots, knitwear. Eschewing the catwalk in favour of more intimate presentation setting in the Roosevelt suite at Brown's Hotel this season, the label cited its 1950s 'sweater girls' as inspiration for Spring. The push and pull that was seen in the textural narrative - embellishment splicing into clean tailoring and lightweight cashmere mixes - was also evident in the balance between the sugary sweet pastel hues of mint, lemon and powdery pink and the vibrant injection of cobalt blue and sea green hues.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Pringle of Scotland

When creative director Alistair Carr departed in April, Pringle of Scotland announced it was retracing its steps to the heart of its roots, knitwear. Eschewing the catwalk in favour of more intimate presentation setting in the Roosevelt suite at Brown's Hotel this season, the label cited its 1950s 'sweater girls' as inspiration for Spring. The push and pull that was seen in the textural narrative - embellishment splicing into clean tailoring and lightweight cashmere mixes - was also evident in the balance between the sugary sweet pastel hues of mint, lemon and powdery pink and the vibrant injection of cobalt blue and sea green hues.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Burberry Prorsum

Christopher Bailey clearly had a plan when he sent out his metallic foil looks at the Men's collections in Milan earlier this year, because the eye-popping shimmering showcase continued in earnest for womenswear - in a full spectrum of vibrant colours. Bailey's love affair with the cape - oversized, metallicised, with or without arm-slits, and in cropped capelet form - means we'll be seeing a lot more of it on the streets come Spring. Outerwear, ever the foundation that the house is built on, was reinterpreted in a myriad of ways - most memorably as mesmerising leather trenches with laser-cut lace detailing, finished with a layer of sheen (metallic, of course). The belted, oversized, degrade-effect opera coats in silk satin, a nod to theBurberry Tielocken (the trench's precursor), were superlative. But material development wasn't the only thing on Burberry's innovation card. Thanks to its thirst for global digital domination, you can now instantly shop all the runway looks online until 23 September, and have them delivered to your door in eight weeks. Fastest fingers first…

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

 

Burberry Prorsum

Christopher Bailey clearly had a plan when he sent out his metallic foil looks at the Men's collections in Milan earlier this year, because the eye-popping shimmering showcase continued in earnest for womenswear - in a full spectrum of vibrant colours. Bailey's love affair with the cape - oversized, metallicised, with or without arm-slits, and in cropped capelet form - means we'll be seeing a lot more of it on the streets come Spring. Outerwear, ever the foundation that the house is built on, was reinterpreted in a myriad of ways - most memorably as mesmerising leather trenches with laser-cut lace detailing, finished with a layer of sheen (metallic, of course). The belted, oversized, degrade-effect opera coats in silk satin, a nod to theBurberry Tielocken (the trench's precursor), were superlative. But material development wasn't the only thing on Burberry's innovation card. Thanks to its thirst for global digital domination, you can now instantly shop all the runway looks online until 23 September, and have them delivered to your door in eight weeks. Fastest fingers first…

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Burberry Prorsum

Christopher Bailey clearly had a plan when he sent out his metallic foil looks at the Men's collections in Milan earlier this year, because the eye-popping shimmering showcase continued in earnest for womenswear - in a full spectrum of vibrant colours. Bailey's love affair with the cape - oversized, metallicised, with or without arm-slits, and in cropped capelet form - means we'll be seeing a lot more of it on the streets come Spring. Outerwear, ever the foundation that the house is built on, was reinterpreted in a myriad of ways - most memorably as mesmerising leather trenches with laser-cut lace detailing, finished with a layer of sheen (metallic, of course). The belted, oversized, degrade-effect opera coats in silk satin, a nod to theBurberry Tielocken (the trench's precursor), were superlative. But material development wasn't the only thing on Burberry's innovation card. Thanks to its thirst for global digital domination, you can now instantly shop all the runway looks online until 23 September, and have them delivered to your door in eight weeks. Fastest fingers first…

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Burberry Prorsum

Christopher Bailey clearly had a plan when he sent out his metallic foil looks at the Men's collections in Milan earlier this year, because the eye-popping shimmering showcase continued in earnest for womenswear - in a full spectrum of vibrant colours. Bailey's love affair with the cape - oversized, metallicised, with or without arm-slits, and in cropped capelet form - means we'll be seeing a lot more of it on the streets come Spring. Outerwear, ever the foundation that the house is built on, was reinterpreted in a myriad of ways - most memorably as mesmerising leather trenches with laser-cut lace detailing, finished with a layer of sheen (metallic, of course). The belted, oversized, degrade-effect opera coats in silk satin, a nod to theBurberry Tielocken (the trench's precursor), were superlative. But material development wasn't the only thing on Burberry's innovation card. Thanks to its thirst for global digital domination, you can now instantly shop all the runway looks online until 23 September, and have them delivered to your door in eight weeks. Fastest fingers first…

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Burberry Prorsum

Christopher Bailey clearly had a plan when he sent out his metallic foil looks at the Men's collections in Milan earlier this year, because the eye-popping shimmering showcase continued in earnest for womenswear - in a full spectrum of vibrant colours. Bailey's love affair with the cape - oversized, metallicised, with or without arm-slits, and in cropped capelet form - means we'll be seeing a lot more of it on the streets come Spring. Outerwear, ever the foundation that the house is built on, was reinterpreted in a myriad of ways - most memorably as mesmerising leather trenches with laser-cut lace detailing, finished with a layer of sheen (metallic, of course). The belted, oversized, degrade-effect opera coats in silk satin, a nod to theBurberry Tielocken (the trench's precursor), were superlative. But material development wasn't the only thing on Burberry's innovation card. Thanks to its thirst for global digital domination, you can now instantly shop all the runway looks online until 23 September, and have them delivered to your door in eight weeks. Fastest fingers first…

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Louise Gray

Louise Gray's signature vibrant mix of pattern, colour and textures was definitely present and correct this season - which, judging by a very packed show - really reflects the zeitgeist. But that's not to say there weren't were seismic shifts in Gray's oeuvre - what seemed at first like a riotous medley of looks could upon closer observation be dissected into intricate individual elements: some soft, like the embroidered chiffon dressed and knitted pieces; and some sharp and tailored, like her angular jackets and skirts, mirrored in the very graphic hats and crowns created by Stephen Jones and the jewellery by Tatty Devine. It is this ambidextrous ability to concentrate on the individual as well a on the overall look of the collection that makes Gray such an exciting designer to watch.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Ursula Geisselmann

Louise Gray

Louise Gray's signature vibrant mix of pattern, colour and textures was definitely present and correct this season - which, judging by a very packed show - really reflects the zeitgeist. But that's not to say there weren't were seismic shifts in Gray's oeuvre - what seemed at first like a riotous medley of looks could upon closer observation be dissected into intricate individual elements: some soft, like the embroidered chiffon dressed and knitted pieces; and some sharp and tailored, like her angular jackets and skirts, mirrored in the very graphic hats and crowns created by Stephen Jones and the jewellery by Tatty Devine. It is this ambidextrous ability to concentrate on the individual as well a on the overall look of the collection that makes Gray such an exciting designer to watch.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Ursula Geisselmann

Louise Gray

Louise Gray's signature vibrant mix of pattern, colour and textures was definitely present and correct this season - which, judging by a very packed show - really reflects the zeitgeist. But that's not to say there weren't were seismic shifts in Gray's oeuvre - what seemed at first like a riotous medley of looks could upon closer observation be dissected into intricate individual elements: some soft, like the embroidered chiffon dressed and knitted pieces; and some sharp and tailored, like her angular jackets and skirts, mirrored in the very graphic hats and crowns created by Stephen Jones and the jewellery by Tatty Devine. It is this ambidextrous ability to concentrate on the individual as well a on the overall look of the collection that makes Gray such an exciting designer to watch.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Ursula Geisselmann

Louise Gray

Louise Gray's signature vibrant mix of pattern, colour and textures was definitely present and correct this season - which, judging by a very packed show - really reflects the zeitgeist. But that's not to say there weren't were seismic shifts in Gray's oeuvre - what seemed at first like a riotous medley of looks could upon closer observation be dissected into intricate individual elements: some soft, like the embroidered chiffon dressed and knitted pieces; and some sharp and tailored, like her angular jackets and skirts, mirrored in the very graphic hats and crowns created by Stephen Jones and the jewellery by Tatty Devine. It is this ambidextrous ability to concentrate on the individual as well a on the overall look of the collection that makes Gray such an exciting designer to watch.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Ursula Geisselmann

Louise Gray

Louise Gray's signature vibrant mix of pattern, colour and textures was definitely present and correct this season - which, judging by a very packed show - really reflects the zeitgeist. But that's not to say there weren't were seismic shifts in Gray's oeuvre - what seemed at first like a riotous medley of looks could upon closer observation be dissected into intricate individual elements: some soft, like the embroidered chiffon dressed and knitted pieces; and some sharp and tailored, like her angular jackets and skirts, mirrored in the very graphic hats and crowns created by Stephen Jones and the jewellery by Tatty Devine. It is this ambidextrous ability to concentrate on the individual as well a on the overall look of the collection that makes Gray such an exciting designer to watch.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Ursula Geisselmann

Christopher Kane

Jelly rubber - the 1980s childhood retro-footwear of choice - has now been fast-tracked to the top of every fashion editor's shopping list. Interlaced into dresses and skirts in hues of candy pink, yellow and grey, the playful material broke the spell of the almost-hypnotic all-white looks that opened the show - the intricate flower-quilting on bomber jackets and elegant folded strips of fabric on dresses being one such example of the Kane's technical artistry. With structured skirt and shift-dress silhouettes dominating the catwalk, the Christopher Kane girl felt more grown up than ever before, but there was still plenty of fun to be had in the candy-coloured tones, pretty bows, Frankenstein-style rubber 'bolt' fastenings, and the quirky but somewhat brilliant juxtaposition of duct tape-style embellishment over womanly lace and bead appliqué.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Christopher Kane

Jelly rubber - the 1980s childhood retro-footwear of choice - has now been fast-tracked to the top of every fashion editor's shopping list. Interlaced into dresses and skirts in hues of candy pink, yellow and grey, the playful material broke the spell of the almost-hypnotic all-white looks that opened the show - the intricate flower-quilting on bomber jackets and elegant folded strips of fabric on dresses being one such example of the Kane's technical artistry. With structured skirt and shift-dress silhouettes dominating the catwalk, the Christopher Kane girl felt more grown up than ever before, but there was still plenty of fun to be had in the candy-coloured tones, pretty bows, Frankenstein-style rubber 'bolt' fastenings, and the quirky but somewhat brilliant juxtaposition of duct tape-style embellishment over womanly lace and bead appliqué.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Christopher Kane

Jelly rubber - the 1980s childhood retro-footwear of choice - has now been fast-tracked to the top of every fashion editor's shopping list. Interlaced into dresses and skirts in hues of candy pink, yellow and grey, the playful material broke the spell of the almost-hypnotic all-white looks that opened the show - the intricate flower-quilting on bomber jackets and elegant folded strips of fabric on dresses being one such example of the Kane's technical artistry. With structured skirt and shift-dress silhouettes dominating the catwalk, the Christopher Kane girl felt more grown up than ever before, but there was still plenty of fun to be had in the candy-coloured tones, pretty bows, Frankenstein-style rubber 'bolt' fastenings, and the quirky but somewhat brilliant juxtaposition of duct tape-style embellishment over womanly lace and bead appliqué.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Christopher Kane

Jelly rubber - the 1980s childhood retro-footwear of choice - has now been fast-tracked to the top of every fashion editor's shopping list. Interlaced into dresses and skirts in hues of candy pink, yellow and grey, the playful material broke the spell of the almost-hypnotic all-white looks that opened the show - the intricate flower-quilting on bomber jackets and elegant folded strips of fabric on dresses being one such example of the Kane's technical artistry. With structured skirt and shift-dress silhouettes dominating the catwalk, the Christopher Kane girl felt more grown up than ever before, but there was still plenty of fun to be had in the candy-coloured tones, pretty bows, Frankenstein-style rubber 'bolt' fastenings, and the quirky but somewhat brilliant juxtaposition of duct tape-style embellishment over womanly lace and bead appliqué.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Christopher Kane

Jelly rubber - the 1980s childhood retro-footwear of choice - has now been fast-tracked to the top of every fashion editor's shopping list. Interlaced into dresses and skirts in hues of candy pink, yellow and grey, the playful material broke the spell of the almost-hypnotic all-white looks that opened the show - the intricate flower-quilting on bomber jackets and elegant folded strips of fabric on dresses being one such example of the Kane's technical artistry. With structured skirt and shift-dress silhouettes dominating the catwalk, the Christopher Kane girl felt more grown up than ever before, but there was still plenty of fun to be had in the candy-coloured tones, pretty bows, Frankenstein-style rubber 'bolt' fastenings, and the quirky but somewhat brilliant juxtaposition of duct tape-style embellishment over womanly lace and bead appliqué.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Peter Pilotto

In fashion, the concept of layering typically applies to fabric. But at Peter Pilotto, there seems no limit to the layering of prints on prints on prints. Designers Peter Pilotto and Christopher De Vos have been pushing the possibilities for several seasons, but now they have teamed up with art director Jonny Lu who developed the print generator software that is partly responsible for the dizzying, dazzling designs (and the rest is still done by hand). Often, the duo used print to direct the lines of a garment in 2D, while boxy cropped jackets and ruffled peplums on hemlines introduced impressive bursts of volume. For every panel of intricate beadwork (circular motifs or mirrored bits), the designers employed thick strips of black for balance.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Peter Pilotto

In fashion, the concept of layering typically applies to fabric. But at Peter Pilotto, there seems no limit to the layering of prints on prints on prints. Designers Peter Pilotto and Christopher De Vos have been pushing the possibilities for several seasons, but now they have teamed up with art director Jonny Lu who developed the print generator software that is partly responsible for the dizzying, dazzling designs (and the rest is still done by hand). Often, the duo used print to direct the lines of a garment in 2D, while boxy cropped jackets and ruffled peplums on hemlines introduced impressive bursts of volume. For every panel of intricate beadwork (circular motifs or mirrored bits), the designers employed thick strips of black for balance.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Peter Pilotto

In fashion, the concept of layering typically applies to fabric. But at Peter Pilotto, there seems no limit to the layering of prints on prints on prints. Designers Peter Pilotto and Christopher De Vos have been pushing the possibilities for several seasons, but now they have teamed up with art director Jonny Lu who developed the print generator software that is partly responsible for the dizzying, dazzling designs (and the rest is still done by hand). Often, the duo used print to direct the lines of a garment in 2D, while boxy cropped jackets and ruffled peplums on hemlines introduced impressive bursts of volume. For every panel of intricate beadwork (circular motifs or mirrored bits), the designers employed thick strips of black for balance.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Peter Pilotto

In fashion, the concept of layering typically applies to fabric. But at Peter Pilotto, there seems no limit to the layering of prints on prints on prints. Designers Peter Pilotto and Christopher De Vos have been pushing the possibilities for several seasons, but now they have teamed up with art director Jonny Lu who developed the print generator software that is partly responsible for the dizzying, dazzling designs (and the rest is still done by hand). Often, the duo used print to direct the lines of a garment in 2D, while boxy cropped jackets and ruffled peplums on hemlines introduced impressive bursts of volume. For every panel of intricate beadwork (circular motifs or mirrored bits), the designers employed thick strips of black for balance.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Peter Pilotto

In fashion, the concept of layering typically applies to fabric. But at Peter Pilotto, there seems no limit to the layering of prints on prints on prints. Designers Peter Pilotto and Christopher De Vos have been pushing the possibilities for several seasons, but now they have teamed up with art director Jonny Lu who developed the print generator software that is partly responsible for the dizzying, dazzling designs (and the rest is still done by hand). Often, the duo used print to direct the lines of a garment in 2D, while boxy cropped jackets and ruffled peplums on hemlines introduced impressive bursts of volume. For every panel of intricate beadwork (circular motifs or mirrored bits), the designers employed thick strips of black for balance.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Peter Pilotto

In fashion, the concept of layering typically applies to fabric. But at Peter Pilotto, there seems no limit to the layering of prints on prints on prints. Designers Peter Pilotto and Christopher De Vos have been pushing the possibilities for several seasons, but now they have teamed up with art director Jonny Lu who developed the print generator software that is partly responsible for the dizzying, dazzling designs (and the rest is still done by hand). Often, the duo used print to direct the lines of a garment in 2D, while boxy cropped jackets and ruffled peplums on hemlines introduced impressive bursts of volume. For every panel of intricate beadwork (circular motifs or mirrored bits), the designers employed thick strips of black for balance.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

J.W. Anderson

J.W. Anderson's capsule collection for Topshop, which launched last week, confirms how fast the designer has established his place in London womenswear after only five full seasons. With fashion's new music muse Azealia Banks looking on, Anderson sent out a remix of masculine and feminine themes. Not afraid of asymmetrical hemlines, Anderson kept some of them angular and added a soft ruffle to others. He worked pinstripe suiting fabric into a robe that tied with a bow. Pieces of shirting pegged to trousers created an unusual pouched skirt effect. But then pyjama suits in a soft paintbrush print were vibrantly minimal, relying on a cross-body black band for visual contrast. The boots - a mashup of mod and cowboy - looked two sizes too big and one can only assume this was intentional. Anderson, however, is proving that he can fill big shoes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

J.W. Anderson

J.W. Anderson's capsule collection for Topshop, which launched last week, confirms how fast the designer has established his place in London womenswear after only five full seasons. With fashion's new music muse Azealia Banks looking on, Anderson sent out a remix of masculine and feminine themes. Not afraid of asymmetrical hemlines, Anderson kept some of them angular and added a soft ruffle to others. He worked pinstripe suiting fabric into a robe that tied with a bow. Pieces of shirting pegged to trousers created an unusual pouched skirt effect. But then pyjama suits in a soft paintbrush print were vibrantly minimal, relying on a cross-body black band for visual contrast. The boots - a mashup of mod and cowboy - looked two sizes too big and one can only assume this was intentional. Anderson, however, is proving that he can fill big shoes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

J.W. Anderson

J.W. Anderson's capsule collection for Topshop, which launched last week, confirms how fast the designer has established his place in London womenswear after only five full seasons. With fashion's new music muse Azealia Banks looking on, Anderson sent out a remix of masculine and feminine themes. Not afraid of asymmetrical hemlines, Anderson kept some of them angular and added a soft ruffle to others. He worked pinstripe suiting fabric into a robe that tied with a bow. Pieces of shirting pegged to trousers created an unusual pouched skirt effect. But then pyjama suits in a soft paintbrush print were vibrantly minimal, relying on a cross-body black band for visual contrast. The boots - a mashup of mod and cowboy - looked two sizes too big and one can only assume this was intentional. Anderson, however, is proving that he can fill big shoes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

J.W. Anderson

J.W. Anderson's capsule collection for Topshop, which launched last week, confirms how fast the designer has established his place in London womenswear after only five full seasons. With fashion's new music muse Azealia Banks looking on, Anderson sent out a remix of masculine and feminine themes. Not afraid of asymmetrical hemlines, Anderson kept some of them angular and added a soft ruffle to others. He worked pinstripe suiting fabric into a robe that tied with a bow. Pieces of shirting pegged to trousers created an unusual pouched skirt effect. But then pyjama suits in a soft paintbrush print were vibrantly minimal, relying on a cross-body black band for visual contrast. The boots - a mashup of mod and cowboy - looked two sizes too big and one can only assume this was intentional. Anderson, however, is proving that he can fill big shoes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

J.W. Anderson

J.W. Anderson's capsule collection for Topshop, which launched last week, confirms how fast the designer has established his place in London womenswear after only five full seasons. With fashion's new music muse Azealia Banks looking on, Anderson sent out a remix of masculine and feminine themes. Not afraid of asymmetrical hemlines, Anderson kept some of them angular and added a soft ruffle to others. He worked pinstripe suiting fabric into a robe that tied with a bow. Pieces of shirting pegged to trousers created an unusual pouched skirt effect. But then pyjama suits in a soft paintbrush print were vibrantly minimal, relying on a cross-body black band for visual contrast. The boots - a mashup of mod and cowboy - looked two sizes too big and one can only assume this was intentional. Anderson, however, is proving that he can fill big shoes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Amy Verner

Richard Nicoll

Hooded a-line sports jackets kitted out with hi-vis stripes, floor-grazing parachute-style skirt trains on dresses with zip-detailed mesh inserts - a strong sportswear sensibility came out in Richard Nicoll's somewhat utilitarian vision for Spring. Even evening-wear had lashings of airtex and cotton mesh detailing - a flourish that worked a treat in the London-born Australian designer's hands. Continuing on from where the Resort and Men's collections left off, Nicoll expanded on the idea of marrying subtle feminine flounces with clean-line silhouettes and sculptural shapes, painting this with a seductive colour palette of white, grey, mint green, cobalt blue, orange and yellow.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Richard Nicoll

Hooded a-line sports jackets kitted out with hi-vis stripes, floor-grazing parachute-style skirt trains on dresses with zip-detailed mesh inserts - a strong sportswear sensibility came out in Richard Nicoll's somewhat utilitarian vision for Spring. Even evening-wear had lashings of airtex and cotton mesh detailing - a flourish that worked a treat in the London-born Australian designer's hands. Continuing on from where the Resort and Men's collections left off, Nicoll expanded on the idea of marrying subtle feminine flounces with clean-line silhouettes and sculptural shapes, painting this with a seductive colour palette of white, grey, mint green, cobalt blue, orange and yellow.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Richard Nicoll

Hooded a-line sports jackets kitted out with hi-vis stripes, floor-grazing parachute-style skirt trains on dresses with zip-detailed mesh inserts - a strong sportswear sensibility came out in Richard Nicoll's somewhat utilitarian vision for Spring. Even evening-wear had lashings of airtex and cotton mesh detailing - a flourish that worked a treat in the London-born Australian designer's hands. Continuing on from where the Resort and Men's collections left off, Nicoll expanded on the idea of marrying subtle feminine flounces with clean-line silhouettes and sculptural shapes, painting this with a seductive colour palette of white, grey, mint green, cobalt blue, orange and yellow.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Richard Nicoll

Hooded a-line sports jackets kitted out with hi-vis stripes, floor-grazing parachute-style skirt trains on dresses with zip-detailed mesh inserts - a strong sportswear sensibility came out in Richard Nicoll's somewhat utilitarian vision for Spring. Even evening-wear had lashings of airtex and cotton mesh detailing - a flourish that worked a treat in the London-born Australian designer's hands. Continuing on from where the Resort and Men's collections left off, Nicoll expanded on the idea of marrying subtle feminine flounces with clean-line silhouettes and sculptural shapes, painting this with a seductive colour palette of white, grey, mint green, cobalt blue, orange and yellow.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Richard Nicoll

Hooded a-line sports jackets kitted out with hi-vis stripes, floor-grazing parachute-style skirt trains on dresses with zip-detailed mesh inserts - a strong sportswear sensibility came out in Richard Nicoll's somewhat utilitarian vision for Spring. Even evening-wear had lashings of airtex and cotton mesh detailing - a flourish that worked a treat in the London-born Australian designer's hands. Continuing on from where the Resort and Men's collections left off, Nicoll expanded on the idea of marrying subtle feminine flounces with clean-line silhouettes and sculptural shapes, painting this with a seductive colour palette of white, grey, mint green, cobalt blue, orange and yellow.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael

Roksanda Ilincic

Roksanda Ilincic – who was obviously in a painterly mood this season – piled on a striking palette of burnt orange, cobalt blue, deep violet, rose pink and marigold yellow to the monochromatic base of her feminine outfits, to charming effect. Blowsy sleeves acted as a nice counterpoint to blouses, which had contrasting, oversized collars to further emphasise the graphic colour story. The evening dresses reworked in jersey were interesting, but Ilincic's artfulness came through in a series of futuristically plastic-laminated organza dresses: the new 'silk' of the season, they were a textural riot.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Apphia Michael


 


 

Roksanda Ilincic

Roksanda Ilincic – who was obviously in a painterly mood this season – piled on a striking palette of burnt orange, cobalt blue, deep violet, rose pink and marigold yellow to the monochromatic base of her feminine outfits, to charming effect. Blowsy sleeves acted as a nice counterpoint to blouses, which had contrasting, oversized collars to further emphasise the graphic colour story. The evening dresses reworked in jersey were interesting, but Ilincic's artfulness came through in a series of futuristically plastic-laminated organza dresses: the new 'silk' of the season, they were a textural riot.

Roksanda Ilincic

Roksanda Ilincic – who was obviously in a painterly mood this season – piled on a striking palette of burnt orange, cobalt blue, deep violet, rose pink and marigold yellow to the monochromatic base of her feminine outfits, to charming effect. Blowsy sleeves acted as a nice counterpoint to blouses, which had contrasting, oversized collars to further emphasise the graphic colour story. The evening dresses reworked in jersey were interesting, but Ilincic's artfulness came through in a series of futuristically plastic-laminated organza dresses: the new 'silk' of the season, they were a textural riot.

Roksanda Ilincic

Roksanda Ilincic – who was obviously in a painterly mood this season – piled on a striking palette of burnt orange, cobalt blue, deep violet, rose pink and marigold yellow to the monochromatic base of her feminine outfits, to charming effect. Blowsy sleeves acted as a nice counterpoint to blouses, which had contrasting, oversized collars to further emphasise the graphic colour story. The evening dresses reworked in jersey were interesting, but Ilincic's artfulness came through in a series of futuristically plastic-laminated organza dresses: the new 'silk' of the season, they were a textural riot.

Roksanda Ilincic

Roksanda Ilincic – who was obviously in a painterly mood this season – piled on a striking palette of burnt orange, cobalt blue, deep violet, rose pink and marigold yellow to the monochromatic base of her feminine outfits, to charming effect. Blowsy sleeves acted as a nice counterpoint to blouses, which had contrasting, oversized collars to further emphasise the graphic colour story. The evening dresses reworked in jersey were interesting, but Ilincic's artfulness came through in a series of futuristically plastic-laminated organza dresses: the new 'silk' of the season, they were a textural riot.

Roksanda Ilincic

Roksanda Ilincic – who was obviously in a painterly mood this season – piled on a striking palette of burnt orange, cobalt blue, deep violet, rose pink and marigold yellow to the monochromatic base of her feminine outfits, to charming effect. Blowsy sleeves acted as a nice counterpoint to blouses, which had contrasting, oversized collars to further emphasise the graphic colour story. The evening dresses reworked in jersey were interesting, but Ilincic's artfulness came through in a series of futuristically plastic-laminated organza dresses: the new 'silk' of the season, they were a textural riot.

Eudon Choi

Retro-futurism was on the brain for Eudon Choi, who called his collection 'Space Oddity', a play on the space-obsessed Bowie of the 1960s and Stanley Kubrick’s cinematic classic ‘2001’. On the runway, Choi reinterpreted the ’60s interpretation of the new millennium, bringing a contemporary hand to the clean lines and shift-shapes of the era. And remember Veruschka, the beautiful seductress who made love to David Thomas's camera during a fashion shoot in Antonioni’s ‘Blow-Up’? Well the iconic 1960s model was at the fore of Choi's mind, too. Her mod vibe lent itself to sleek cocoon coats, cigarette pants, geometric block patterns and shiny PVC leathers, deftly cut into oversized boxy tops and jackets. This may be just the second on-schedule London Fashion Week show for the Korean-born designer, but if his fashion-forward collection is anything to go by, his future's looking bright.

Photography: Christopher Dadey; Words: Apphia Michael


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