Dries Van Noten

‘Heaven, I’m in heaven…’ – Fred Astaire’s dulcet tones weren’t the only dreamy thing to resonate at Dries Van Noten’s show. Opening his show with ‘Cheek to Cheek’ (Astaire’s song for Ginger Rogers in the 1935 movie Top Hat), Van Noten pretty much prophesised what we would be feeling when we exited the beautiful cloistered halls of Paris’ City Hall – just heavenly. The idea of ‘fused genders’ was very much at the heart of the Belgian designer’s Fall serenade. Taking cues from both Fred and Ginger, the collection saw the likes of a men’s tailored shirt being tucked nonchalantly into a womanly wispy below-the-knee feathered skirt - a pair of grey trousers peeking just below the skirt’s hem. The structured, strong manliness of some of the looks, which in the first half were punctuated with preppy club-striped blazers and scarves, gradually glided into a softer gear: faded wallpaper motifs, chinoiserie, shimmering brocade and luxuriously textured ostrich feathers, which appeared as maribou trim on floaty tops and even punctuated with glittery stones on a particularly striking raspberry pink chiffon dress.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Dries Van Noten

‘Heaven, I’m in heaven…’ – Fred Astaire’s dulcet tones weren’t the only dreamy thing to resonate at Dries Van Noten’s show. Opening his show with ‘Cheek to Cheek’ (Astaire’s song for Ginger Rogers in the 1935 movie Top Hat), Van Noten pretty much prophesised what we would be feeling when we exited the beautiful cloistered halls of Paris’ City Hall – just heavenly. The idea of ‘fused genders’ was very much at the heart of the Belgian designer’s Fall serenade. Taking cues from both Fred and Ginger, the collection saw the likes of a men’s tailored shirt being tucked nonchalantly into a womanly wispy below-the-knee feathered skirt - a pair of grey trousers peeking just below the skirt’s hem. The structured, strong manliness of some of the looks, which in the first half were punctuated with preppy club-striped blazers and scarves, gradually glided into a softer gear: faded wallpaper motifs, chinoiserie, shimmering brocade and luxuriously textured ostrich feathers, which appeared as maribou trim on floaty tops and even punctuated with glittery stones on a particularly striking raspberry pink chiffon dress.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Dries Van Noten

‘Heaven, I’m in heaven…’ – Fred Astaire’s dulcet tones weren’t the only dreamy thing to resonate at Dries Van Noten’s show. Opening his show with ‘Cheek to Cheek’ (Astaire’s song for Ginger Rogers in the 1935 movie Top Hat), Van Noten pretty much prophesised what we would be feeling when we exited the beautiful cloistered halls of Paris’ City Hall – just heavenly. The idea of ‘fused genders’ was very much at the heart of the Belgian designer’s Fall serenade. Taking cues from both Fred and Ginger, the collection saw the likes of a men’s tailored shirt being tucked nonchalantly into a womanly wispy below-the-knee feathered skirt - a pair of grey trousers peeking just below the skirt’s hem. The structured, strong manliness of some of the looks, which in the first half were punctuated with preppy club-striped blazers and scarves, gradually glided into a softer gear: faded wallpaper motifs, chinoiserie, shimmering brocade and luxuriously textured ostrich feathers, which appeared as maribou trim on floaty tops and even punctuated with glittery stones on a particularly striking raspberry pink chiffon dress.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Dries Van Noten

‘Heaven, I’m in heaven…’ – Fred Astaire’s dulcet tones weren’t the only dreamy thing to resonate at Dries Van Noten’s show. Opening his show with ‘Cheek to Cheek’ (Astaire’s song for Ginger Rogers in the 1935 movie Top Hat), Van Noten pretty much prophesised what we would be feeling when we exited the beautiful cloistered halls of Paris’ City Hall – just heavenly. The idea of ‘fused genders’ was very much at the heart of the Belgian designer’s Fall serenade. Taking cues from both Fred and Ginger, the collection saw the likes of a men’s tailored shirt being tucked nonchalantly into a womanly wispy below-the-knee feathered skirt - a pair of grey trousers peeking just below the skirt’s hem. The structured, strong manliness of some of the looks, which in the first half were punctuated with preppy club-striped blazers and scarves, gradually glided into a softer gear: faded wallpaper motifs, chinoiserie, shimmering brocade and luxuriously textured ostrich feathers, which appeared as maribou trim on floaty tops and even punctuated with glittery stones on a particularly striking raspberry pink chiffon dress.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Dries Van Noten

‘Heaven, I’m in heaven…’ – Fred Astaire’s dulcet tones weren’t the only dreamy thing to resonate at Dries Van Noten’s show. Opening his show with ‘Cheek to Cheek’ (Astaire’s song for Ginger Rogers in the 1935 movie Top Hat), Van Noten pretty much prophesised what we would be feeling when we exited the beautiful cloistered halls of Paris’ City Hall – just heavenly. The idea of ‘fused genders’ was very much at the heart of the Belgian designer’s Fall serenade. Taking cues from both Fred and Ginger, the collection saw the likes of a men’s tailored shirt being tucked nonchalantly into a womanly wispy below-the-knee feathered skirt - a pair of grey trousers peeking just below the skirt’s hem. The structured, strong manliness of some of the looks, which in the first half were punctuated with preppy club-striped blazers and scarves, gradually glided into a softer gear: faded wallpaper motifs, chinoiserie, shimmering brocade and luxuriously textured ostrich feathers, which appeared as maribou trim on floaty tops and even punctuated with glittery stones on a particularly striking raspberry pink chiffon dress.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Rochas

The Rochas girl has always known how to dress like a lady, but this season, she upped the ante with a positively breathtaking entrance, gliding down the grand marble staircase of the Espace Cambon with perfectly coiffured hair, curled and side-swept behind the ear to perfection. Creative director Marco Zanini's tale of 'beauty and nonchalance' saw a coming together of ladylike knits, oversized cocoon-shaped opera coats and stiffly-pleated, sweeping skirts. In the case of one such baby pink skirt (printed with blue mini cabbage roses), the story of volume was further emphasised with the help of neoprene, which was bonded to double duchess silk chiné for a blowsy effect. The designer contemporised his 1950s New Look silhouettes with menswear-inspired, double-faced blazers, cut with contoured lapels, and a series of bright and cheerful, cropped silk trousers. Most notably though, the collection was a delightful exercise in palette exploration - a powder blue and specked peach number that opened the show was swiftly followed by the likes of mustard yellow, camel, mallard green, aubergine and Prince of Wales grey check.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Rochas

The Rochas girl has always known how to dress like a lady, but this season, she upped the ante with a positively breathtaking entrance, gliding down the grand marble staircase of the Espace Cambon with perfectly coiffured hair, curled and side-swept behind the ear to perfection. Creative director Marco Zanini's tale of 'beauty and nonchalance' saw a coming together of ladylike knits, oversized cocoon-shaped opera coats and stiffly-pleated, sweeping skirts. In the case of one such baby pink skirt (printed with blue mini cabbage roses), the story of volume was further emphasised with the help of neoprene, which was bonded to double duchess silk chiné for a blowsy effect. The designer contemporised his 1950s New Look silhouettes with menswear-inspired, double-faced blazers, cut with contoured lapels, and a series of bright and cheerful, cropped silk trousers. Most notably though, the collection was a delightful exercise in palette exploration - a powder blue and specked peach number that opened the show was swiftly followed by the likes of mustard yellow, camel, mallard green, aubergine and Prince of Wales grey check.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Rochas

The Rochas girl has always known how to dress like a lady, but this season, she upped the ante with a positively breathtaking entrance, gliding down the grand marble staircase of the Espace Cambon with perfectly coiffured hair, curled and side-swept behind the ear to perfection. Creative director Marco Zanini's tale of 'beauty and nonchalance' saw a coming together of ladylike knits, oversized cocoon-shaped opera coats and stiffly-pleated, sweeping skirts. In the case of one such baby pink skirt (printed with blue mini cabbage roses), the story of volume was further emphasised with the help of neoprene, which was bonded to double duchess silk chiné for a blowsy effect. The designer contemporised his 1950s New Look silhouettes with menswear-inspired, double-faced blazers, cut with contoured lapels, and a series of bright and cheerful, cropped silk trousers. Most notably though, the collection was a delightful exercise in palette exploration - a powder blue and specked peach number that opened the show was swiftly followed by the likes of mustard yellow, camel, mallard green, aubergine and Prince of Wales grey check.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Rochas

The Rochas girl has always known how to dress like a lady, but this season, she upped the ante with a positively breathtaking entrance, gliding down the grand marble staircase of the Espace Cambon with perfectly coiffured hair, curled and side-swept behind the ear to perfection. Creative director Marco Zanini's tale of 'beauty and nonchalance' saw a coming together of ladylike knits, oversized cocoon-shaped opera coats and stiffly-pleated, sweeping skirts. In the case of one such baby pink skirt (printed with blue mini cabbage roses), the story of volume was further emphasised with the help of neoprene, which was bonded to double duchess silk chiné for a blowsy effect. The designer contemporised his 1950s New Look silhouettes with menswear-inspired, double-faced blazers, cut with contoured lapels, and a series of bright and cheerful, cropped silk trousers. Most notably though, the collection was a delightful exercise in palette exploration - a powder blue and specked peach number that opened the show was swiftly followed by the likes of mustard yellow, camel, mallard green, aubergine and Prince of Wales grey check.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Rochas

The Rochas girl has always known how to dress like a lady, but this season, she upped the ante with a positively breathtaking entrance, gliding down the grand marble staircase of the Espace Cambon with perfectly coiffured hair, curled and side-swept behind the ear to perfection. Creative director Marco Zanini's tale of 'beauty and nonchalance' saw a coming together of ladylike knits, oversized cocoon-shaped opera coats and stiffly-pleated, sweeping skirts. In the case of one such baby pink skirt (printed with blue mini cabbage roses), the story of volume was further emphasised with the help of neoprene, which was bonded to double duchess silk chiné for a blowsy effect. The designer contemporised his 1950s New Look silhouettes with menswear-inspired, double-faced blazers, cut with contoured lapels, and a series of bright and cheerful, cropped silk trousers. Most notably though, the collection was a delightful exercise in palette exploration - a powder blue and specked peach number that opened the show was swiftly followed by the likes of mustard yellow, camel, mallard green, aubergine and Prince of Wales grey check.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Balmain

Of all the waves of 1980s madness that have rolled over the house of Balmain since its relaunch nearly five years ago, the one that landed for Fall was the most tsunami-sized of them all. From the first look out, a tiny swath of silver lame (it was a skirt!) worn with a queen's stash of crystal embroidery cut into a padded harlequin motif, creative director Olivier Rousteing's bold statements never let up. The seasonal silhouette was worked in two directions - on the one hand, there were the jackets with shoulders chiseled as sharply as the Egyptian pyramids and waists clamped in thick gold vice, worn over harem-shaped high-waisted trousers; other times, Rousteing brought out micro-sized jazzed up dresses and skirts, half which sported asymmetrical necklines. It wasn't always perfect - at times the pot boiled over with its wacky, eye-popping, lurex-washed glamour - but we appreciate this young designer's verve and confidence to pick an idea and really let it rip.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Balmain

Of all the waves of 1980s madness that have rolled over the house of Balmain since its relaunch nearly five years ago, the one that landed for Fall was the most tsunami-sized of them all. From the first look out, a tiny swath of silver lame (it was a skirt!) worn with a queen's stash of crystal embroidery cut into a padded harlequin motif, creative director Olivier Rousteing's bold statements never let up. The seasonal silhouette was worked in two directions - on the one hand, there were the jackets with shoulders chiseled as sharply as the Egyptian pyramids and waists clamped in thick gold vice, worn over harem-shaped high-waisted trousers; other times, Rousteing brought out micro-sized jazzed up dresses and skirts, half which sported asymmetrical necklines. It wasn't always perfect - at times the pot boiled over with its wacky, eye-popping, lurex-washed glamour - but we appreciate this young designer's verve and confidence to pick an idea and really let it rip.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Balmain

Of all the waves of 1980s madness that have rolled over the house of Balmain since its relaunch nearly five years ago, the one that landed for Fall was the most tsunami-sized of them all. From the first look out, a tiny swath of silver lame (it was a skirt!) worn with a queen's stash of crystal embroidery cut into a padded harlequin motif, creative director Olivier Rousteing's bold statements never let up. The seasonal silhouette was worked in two directions - on the one hand, there were the jackets with shoulders chiseled as sharply as the Egyptian pyramids and waists clamped in thick gold vice, worn over harem-shaped high-waisted trousers; other times, Rousteing brought out micro-sized jazzed up dresses and skirts, half which sported asymmetrical necklines. It wasn't always perfect - at times the pot boiled over with its wacky, eye-popping, lurex-washed glamour - but we appreciate this young designer's verve and confidence to pick an idea and really let it rip.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Balmain

Of all the waves of 1980s madness that have rolled over the house of Balmain since its relaunch nearly five years ago, the one that landed for Fall was the most tsunami-sized of them all. From the first look out, a tiny swath of silver lame (it was a skirt!) worn with a queen's stash of crystal embroidery cut into a padded harlequin motif, creative director Olivier Rousteing's bold statements never let up. The seasonal silhouette was worked in two directions - on the one hand, there were the jackets with shoulders chiseled as sharply as the Egyptian pyramids and waists clamped in thick gold vice, worn over harem-shaped high-waisted trousers; other times, Rousteing brought out micro-sized jazzed up dresses and skirts, half which sported asymmetrical necklines. It wasn't always perfect - at times the pot boiled over with its wacky, eye-popping, lurex-washed glamour - but we appreciate this young designer's verve and confidence to pick an idea and really let it rip.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Balmain

Of all the waves of 1980s madness that have rolled over the house of Balmain since its relaunch nearly five years ago, the one that landed for Fall was the most tsunami-sized of them all. From the first look out, a tiny swath of silver lame (it was a skirt!) worn with a queen's stash of crystal embroidery cut into a padded harlequin motif, creative director Olivier Rousteing's bold statements never let up. The seasonal silhouette was worked in two directions - on the one hand, there were the jackets with shoulders chiseled as sharply as the Egyptian pyramids and waists clamped in thick gold vice, worn over harem-shaped high-waisted trousers; other times, Rousteing brought out micro-sized jazzed up dresses and skirts, half which sported asymmetrical necklines. It wasn't always perfect - at times the pot boiled over with its wacky, eye-popping, lurex-washed glamour - but we appreciate this young designer's verve and confidence to pick an idea and really let it rip.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Rick Owens

Rick Owens literally blew us away with his models' wind-swept hair this season. Emerging from a glowing gust of steam, the troop of women came across like angelic otherworldly warriors, their hair floating as if charged with an electric shock. The lightness up top also brought a new verve to the outerwear down below - Owens' signature forte. Having previously worked leather into every possible iteration, the designer blazed new territory with nylon, a fresh fabric choice that is destined to launch another million knock-offs. Rather than make it look bulky or traditionally puffed up, Owens cut the nylon into kimono-shaped sleeves, cape-like backs on his boxy jackets and slightly A-frame dresses. The effect was more couture than casual, especially when Owens patched together blocks of suede, wool and nylon, weaving in strips of material that looked like giant knarls of twisted steel cable

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Rick Owens

Rick Owens literally blew us away with his models' wind-swept hair this season. Emerging from a glowing gust of steam, the troop of women came across like angelic otherworldly warriors, their hair floating as if charged with an electric shock. The lightness up top also brought a new verve to the outerwear down below - Owens' signature forte. Having previously worked leather into every possible iteration, the designer blazed new territory with nylon, a fresh fabric choice that is destined to launch another million knock-offs. Rather than make it look bulky or traditionally puffed up, Owens cut the nylon into kimono-shaped sleeves, cape-like backs on his boxy jackets and slightly A-frame dresses. The effect was more couture than casual, especially when Owens patched together blocks of suede, wool and nylon, weaving in strips of material that looked like giant knarls of twisted steel cable

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Rick Owens

Rick Owens literally blew us away with his models' wind-swept hair this season. Emerging from a glowing gust of steam, the troop of women came across like angelic otherworldly warriors, their hair floating as if charged with an electric shock. The lightness up top also brought a new verve to the outerwear down below - Owens' signature forte. Having previously worked leather into every possible iteration, the designer blazed new territory with nylon, a fresh fabric choice that is destined to launch another million knock-offs. Rather than make it look bulky or traditionally puffed up, Owens cut the nylon into kimono-shaped sleeves, cape-like backs on his boxy jackets and slightly A-frame dresses. The effect was more couture than casual, especially when Owens patched together blocks of suede, wool and nylon, weaving in strips of material that looked like giant knarls of twisted steel cable

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Rick Owens

Rick Owens literally blew us away with his models' wind-swept hair this season. Emerging from a glowing gust of steam, the troop of women came across like angelic otherworldly warriors, their hair floating as if charged with an electric shock. The lightness up top also brought a new verve to the outerwear down below - Owens' signature forte. Having previously worked leather into every possible iteration, the designer blazed new territory with nylon, a fresh fabric choice that is destined to launch another million knock-offs. Rather than make it look bulky or traditionally puffed up, Owens cut the nylon into kimono-shaped sleeves, cape-like backs on his boxy jackets and slightly A-frame dresses. The effect was more couture than casual, especially when Owens patched together blocks of suede, wool and nylon, weaving in strips of material that looked like giant knarls of twisted steel cable

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Rick Owens

Rick Owens literally blew us away with his models' wind-swept hair this season. Emerging from a glowing gust of steam, the troop of women came across like angelic otherworldly warriors, their hair floating as if charged with an electric shock. The lightness up top also brought a new verve to the outerwear down below - Owens' signature forte. Having previously worked leather into every possible iteration, the designer blazed new territory with nylon, a fresh fabric choice that is destined to launch another million knock-offs. Rather than make it look bulky or traditionally puffed up, Owens cut the nylon into kimono-shaped sleeves, cape-like backs on his boxy jackets and slightly A-frame dresses. The effect was more couture than casual, especially when Owens patched together blocks of suede, wool and nylon, weaving in strips of material that looked like giant knarls of twisted steel cable

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Nina Ricci

Creative Director Peter Copping nailed his latest Nina Ricci show with a big, sharp, womanly stake. Taking a 180 degree turn from his dalliance with edgy last season, Copping dived in to what he does best: rigorously feminine, beautiful clothes. The coolness this season came from the skintight Hitchcockian silhouettes that opened the show, like the tailleurs with razor sharp, super-skinny pencil skirts rendered in textured, single-tone felted wools. The shape later ballooned out a bit, as Copping offered his take on Fall's new full-skirted suits - his were perky and short, but rendered in sober wools and stretch tweeds, and made even more modern by the cropped boxy jackets in matching fabric. The women looked delicious with blood red lips, hair swept off the face in thick black headbands, and their pointed-toe ankle-strap stilettos. Then evening hit, and Copping sent out a series of chiffon beauties with sweetheart necklines and voluminous plumed coats in black silk taffeta tufted with delicate feathers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Nina Ricci

Creative Director Peter Copping nailed his latest Nina Ricci show with a big, sharp, womanly stake. Taking a 180 degree turn from his dalliance with edgy last season, Copping dived in to what he does best: rigorously feminine, beautiful clothes. The coolness this season came from the skintight Hitchcockian silhouettes that opened the show, like the tailleurs with razor sharp, super-skinny pencil skirts rendered in textured, single-tone felted wools. The shape later ballooned out a bit, as Copping offered his take on Fall's new full-skirted suits - his were perky and short, but rendered in sober wools and stretch tweeds, and made even more modern by the cropped boxy jackets in matching fabric. The women looked delicious with blood red lips, hair swept off the face in thick black headbands, and their pointed-toe ankle-strap stilettos. Then evening hit, and Copping sent out a series of chiffon beauties with sweetheart necklines and voluminous plumed coats in black silk taffeta tufted with delicate feathers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Nina Ricci

Creative Director Peter Copping nailed his latest Nina Ricci show with a big, sharp, womanly stake. Taking a 180 degree turn from his dalliance with edgy last season, Copping dived in to what he does best: rigorously feminine, beautiful clothes. The coolness this season came from the skintight Hitchcockian silhouettes that opened the show, like the tailleurs with razor sharp, super-skinny pencil skirts rendered in textured, single-tone felted wools. The shape later ballooned out a bit, as Copping offered his take on Fall's new full-skirted suits - his were perky and short, but rendered in sober wools and stretch tweeds, and made even more modern by the cropped boxy jackets in matching fabric. The women looked delicious with blood red lips, hair swept off the face in thick black headbands, and their pointed-toe ankle-strap stilettos. Then evening hit, and Copping sent out a series of chiffon beauties with sweetheart necklines and voluminous plumed coats in black silk taffeta tufted with delicate feathers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Nina Ricci

Creative Director Peter Copping nailed his latest Nina Ricci show with a big, sharp, womanly stake. Taking a 180 degree turn from his dalliance with edgy last season, Copping dived in to what he does best: rigorously feminine, beautiful clothes. The coolness this season came from the skintight Hitchcockian silhouettes that opened the show, like the tailleurs with razor sharp, super-skinny pencil skirts rendered in textured, single-tone felted wools. The shape later ballooned out a bit, as Copping offered his take on Fall's new full-skirted suits - his were perky and short, but rendered in sober wools and stretch tweeds, and made even more modern by the cropped boxy jackets in matching fabric. The women looked delicious with blood red lips, hair swept off the face in thick black headbands, and their pointed-toe ankle-strap stilettos. Then evening hit, and Copping sent out a series of chiffon beauties with sweetheart necklines and voluminous plumed coats in black silk taffeta tufted with delicate feathers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Nina Ricci

Creative Director Peter Copping nailed his latest Nina Ricci show with a big, sharp, womanly stake. Taking a 180 degree turn from his dalliance with edgy last season, Copping dived in to what he does best: rigorously feminine, beautiful clothes. The coolness this season came from the skintight Hitchcockian silhouettes that opened the show, like the tailleurs with razor sharp, super-skinny pencil skirts rendered in textured, single-tone felted wools. The shape later ballooned out a bit, as Copping offered his take on Fall's new full-skirted suits - his were perky and short, but rendered in sober wools and stretch tweeds, and made even more modern by the cropped boxy jackets in matching fabric. The women looked delicious with blood red lips, hair swept off the face in thick black headbands, and their pointed-toe ankle-strap stilettos. Then evening hit, and Copping sent out a series of chiffon beauties with sweetheart necklines and voluminous plumed coats in black silk taffeta tufted with delicate feathers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Lanvin

Alber Elbaz was back in top form for Fall, delivering a collection that oozed Parisian chic. Elbaz began the proceedings with a run of cocktail-based looks: tiered black lace dresses, or fierce matching trouser and top sets that were showered in his signature doorknob-sized crystal jewellery and pet dragonflies that perched on his models' shoulders. But the twist this season was his introduction of flat, shiny footwear into these otherwise dressy looks. The pointy-toed lace-ups - mod, sharp and graphic in their lines - are about as sporty as this designer will ever go, and they are sure to drive the legions of women who call themselves Alber fans running into the shop for a pair. Of course, there's still every reason to throw on a pair of his ankle-strap high heels with a dress, like the strapless, extremely flared cocktail number that Elbaz had crafted from a pristine palette of black wool. It was perfection in every sense of the word.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Lanvin

Alber Elbaz was back in top form for Fall, delivering a collection that oozed Parisian chic. Elbaz began the proceedings with a run of cocktail-based looks: tiered black lace dresses, or fierce matching trouser and top sets that were showered in his signature doorknob-sized crystal jewellery and pet dragonflies that perched on his models' shoulders. But the twist this season was his introduction of flat, shiny footwear into these otherwise dressy looks. The pointy-toed lace-ups - mod, sharp and graphic in their lines - are about as sporty as this designer will ever go, and they are sure to drive the legions of women who call themselves Alber fans running into the shop for a pair. Of course, there's still every reason to throw on a pair of his ankle-strap high heels with a dress, like the strapless, extremely flared cocktail number that Elbaz had crafted from a pristine palette of black wool. It was perfection in every sense of the word.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Lanvin

Alber Elbaz was back in top form for Fall, delivering a collection that oozed Parisian chic. Elbaz began the proceedings with a run of cocktail-based looks: tiered black lace dresses, or fierce matching trouser and top sets that were showered in his signature doorknob-sized crystal jewellery and pet dragonflies that perched on his models' shoulders. But the twist this season was his introduction of flat, shiny footwear into these otherwise dressy looks. The pointy-toed lace-ups - mod, sharp and graphic in their lines - are about as sporty as this designer will ever go, and they are sure to drive the legions of women who call themselves Alber fans running into the shop for a pair. Of course, there's still every reason to throw on a pair of his ankle-strap high heels with a dress, like the strapless, extremely flared cocktail number that Elbaz had crafted from a pristine palette of black wool. It was perfection in every sense of the word.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Lanvin

Alber Elbaz was back in top form for Fall, delivering a collection that oozed Parisian chic. Elbaz began the proceedings with a run of cocktail-based looks: tiered black lace dresses, or fierce matching trouser and top sets that were showered in his signature doorknob-sized crystal jewellery and pet dragonflies that perched on his models' shoulders. But the twist this season was his introduction of flat, shiny footwear into these otherwise dressy looks. The pointy-toed lace-ups - mod, sharp and graphic in their lines - are about as sporty as this designer will ever go, and they are sure to drive the legions of women who call themselves Alber fans running into the shop for a pair. Of course, there's still every reason to throw on a pair of his ankle-strap high heels with a dress, like the strapless, extremely flared cocktail number that Elbaz had crafted from a pristine palette of black wool. It was perfection in every sense of the word.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Lanvin

Alber Elbaz was back in top form for Fall, delivering a collection that oozed Parisian chic. Elbaz began the proceedings with a run of cocktail-based looks: tiered black lace dresses, or fierce matching trouser and top sets that were showered in his signature doorknob-sized crystal jewellery and pet dragonflies that perched on his models' shoulders. But the twist this season was his introduction of flat, shiny footwear into these otherwise dressy looks. The pointy-toed lace-ups - mod, sharp and graphic in their lines - are about as sporty as this designer will ever go, and they are sure to drive the legions of women who call themselves Alber fans running into the shop for a pair. Of course, there's still every reason to throw on a pair of his ankle-strap high heels with a dress, like the strapless, extremely flared cocktail number that Elbaz had crafted from a pristine palette of black wool. It was perfection in every sense of the word.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Roland Mouret

Roland Mouret went on a journey of construction for Fall. Pulling out his tools of the trade, he sliced away at wool felts, satins and leathers, and then stitched them back up into wearable, walking fashion collages. The concept worked beautifully on many pieces, such as the opening series of dresses featuring colour blocks of diamond-shaped appliqués in mustard, electric blue, black and white. Mouret fashioned everything with a sharp graphic edge: his jackets and coats featured straight horizontal lines from shoulder to shoulder, while high-waisted trousers had a gradual but defined tapering. We liked the way the super long detachable leather spats made stilettos look like over-the-knee boots, but that concept applied over trousers will be tricky for women who don't want to look like hockey goalies. A fail-safe option would be the two-tone leopard pattern - particularly convincing in a dress that was spliced up with panels of black and white and stitched up the rear with a long, vertical gold zip.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Roland Mouret

Roland Mouret went on a journey of construction for Fall. Pulling out his tools of the trade, he sliced away at wool felts, satins and leathers, and then stitched them back up into wearable, walking fashion collages. The concept worked beautifully on many pieces, such as the opening series of dresses featuring colour blocks of diamond-shaped appliqués in mustard, electric blue, black and white. Mouret fashioned everything with a sharp graphic edge: his jackets and coats featured straight horizontal lines from shoulder to shoulder, while high-waisted trousers had a gradual but defined tapering. We liked the way the super long detachable leather spats made stilettos look like over-the-knee boots, but that concept applied over trousers will be tricky for women who don't want to look like hockey goalies. A fail-safe option would be the two-tone leopard pattern - particularly convincing in a dress that was spliced up with panels of black and white and stitched up the rear with a long, vertical gold zip.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Roland Mouret

Roland Mouret went on a journey of construction for Fall. Pulling out his tools of the trade, he sliced away at wool felts, satins and leathers, and then stitched them back up into wearable, walking fashion collages. The concept worked beautifully on many pieces, such as the opening series of dresses featuring colour blocks of diamond-shaped appliqués in mustard, electric blue, black and white. Mouret fashioned everything with a sharp graphic edge: his jackets and coats featured straight horizontal lines from shoulder to shoulder, while high-waisted trousers had a gradual but defined tapering. We liked the way the super long detachable leather spats made stilettos look like over-the-knee boots, but that concept applied over trousers will be tricky for women who don't want to look like hockey goalies. A fail-safe option would be the two-tone leopard pattern - particularly convincing in a dress that was spliced up with panels of black and white and stitched up the rear with a long, vertical gold zip.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Roland Mouret

Roland Mouret went on a journey of construction for Fall. Pulling out his tools of the trade, he sliced away at wool felts, satins and leathers, and then stitched them back up into wearable, walking fashion collages. The concept worked beautifully on many pieces, such as the opening series of dresses featuring colour blocks of diamond-shaped appliqués in mustard, electric blue, black and white. Mouret fashioned everything with a sharp graphic edge: his jackets and coats featured straight horizontal lines from shoulder to shoulder, while high-waisted trousers had a gradual but defined tapering. We liked the way the super long detachable leather spats made stilettos look like over-the-knee boots, but that concept applied over trousers will be tricky for women who don't want to look like hockey goalies. A fail-safe option would be the two-tone leopard pattern - particularly convincing in a dress that was spliced up with panels of black and white and stitched up the rear with a long, vertical gold zip.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Roland Mouret

Roland Mouret went on a journey of construction for Fall. Pulling out his tools of the trade, he sliced away at wool felts, satins and leathers, and then stitched them back up into wearable, walking fashion collages. The concept worked beautifully on many pieces, such as the opening series of dresses featuring colour blocks of diamond-shaped appliqués in mustard, electric blue, black and white. Mouret fashioned everything with a sharp graphic edge: his jackets and coats featured straight horizontal lines from shoulder to shoulder, while high-waisted trousers had a gradual but defined tapering. We liked the way the super long detachable leather spats made stilettos look like over-the-knee boots, but that concept applied over trousers will be tricky for women who don't want to look like hockey goalies. A fail-safe option would be the two-tone leopard pattern - particularly convincing in a dress that was spliced up with panels of black and white and stitched up the rear with a long, vertical gold zip.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Christian Dior

That Raf Simons intrinsically understands the Dior woman is a given. That the Belgian designer, barely installed in this grand fashion house for a year, is able to concurrently push and redefine that woman with his own signatures, while never once losing sight of the house's codes, is an even greater testament to his genius. For Fall, Simons shone the spotlight on art, particularly the themes of Surrealism and Pop, touching on a little know career fact about Christian Dior - that the master couturier began his career as a gallerist, representing the likes of Dali and Giacometti. Simons pointed out a connection between the master couturier and himself: their mutual love for 'retro' art - Dior with the Belle Époque and Simons with Mid-Century modern. Simons' 'visual scrapbook' of looks saw elegant tailoring being presented alongside softer crochet knits and wispy silk shifts. Also in the mix was a softer take on the famous bar jacket - now in wool denim and paired with flowing wide-leg trousers - while Dior's iconic houndstooth pattern appeared quite effectively on bustier dresses. Collaborating with the Andy Warhol Foundation, Simons, who cited the 'delicacy and sensitivity' of the hand work in Warhol's early output in his show notes, transposed the artist's hand drawings into motifs that were printed or embroidered onto clothes, such as on the peplum of a cocktail number, or on the front of a flowing strapless dress.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Christian Dior

That Raf Simons intrinsically understands the Dior woman is a given. That the Belgian designer, barely installed in this grand fashion house for a year, is able to concurrently push and redefine that woman with his own signatures, while never once losing sight of the house's codes, is an even greater testament to his genius. For Fall, Simons shone the spotlight on art, particularly the themes of Surrealism and Pop, touching on a little know career fact about Christian Dior - that the master couturier began his career as a gallerist, representing the likes of Dali and Giacometti. Simons pointed out a connection between the master couturier and himself: their mutual love for 'retro' art - Dior with the Belle Époque and Simons with Mid-Century modern. Simons' 'visual scrapbook' of looks saw elegant tailoring being presented alongside softer crochet knits and wispy silk shifts. Also in the mix was a softer take on the famous bar jacket - now in wool denim and paired with flowing wide-leg trousers - while Dior's iconic houndstooth pattern appeared quite effectively on bustier dresses. Collaborating with the Andy Warhol Foundation, Simons, who cited the 'delicacy and sensitivity' of the hand work in Warhol's early output in his show notes, transposed the artist's hand drawings into motifs that were printed or embroidered onto clothes, such as on the peplum of a cocktail number, or on the front of a flowing strapless dress.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Christian Dior

That Raf Simons intrinsically understands the Dior woman is a given. That the Belgian designer, barely installed in this grand fashion house for a year, is able to concurrently push and redefine that woman with his own signatures, while never once losing sight of the house's codes, is an even greater testament to his genius. For Fall, Simons shone the spotlight on art, particularly the themes of Surrealism and Pop, touching on a little know career fact about Christian Dior - that the master couturier began his career as a gallerist, representing the likes of Dali and Giacometti. Simons pointed out a connection between the master couturier and himself: their mutual love for 'retro' art - Dior with the Belle Époque and Simons with Mid-Century modern. Simons' 'visual scrapbook' of looks saw elegant tailoring being presented alongside softer crochet knits and wispy silk shifts. Also in the mix was a softer take on the famous bar jacket - now in wool denim and paired with flowing wide-leg trousers - while Dior's iconic houndstooth pattern appeared quite effectively on bustier dresses. Collaborating with the Andy Warhol Foundation, Simons, who cited the 'delicacy and sensitivity' of the hand work in Warhol's early output in his show notes, transposed the artist's hand drawings into motifs that were printed or embroidered onto clothes, such as on the peplum of a cocktail number, or on the front of a flowing strapless dress.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Christian Dior

That Raf Simons intrinsically understands the Dior woman is a given. That the Belgian designer, barely installed in this grand fashion house for a year, is able to concurrently push and redefine that woman with his own signatures, while never once losing sight of the house's codes, is an even greater testament to his genius. For Fall, Simons shone the spotlight on art, particularly the themes of Surrealism and Pop, touching on a little know career fact about Christian Dior - that the master couturier began his career as a gallerist, representing the likes of Dali and Giacometti. Simons pointed out a connection between the master couturier and himself: their mutual love for 'retro' art - Dior with the Belle Époque and Simons with Mid-Century modern. Simons' 'visual scrapbook' of looks saw elegant tailoring being presented alongside softer crochet knits and wispy silk shifts. Also in the mix was a softer take on the famous bar jacket - now in wool denim and paired with flowing wide-leg trousers - while Dior's iconic houndstooth pattern appeared quite effectively on bustier dresses. Collaborating with the Andy Warhol Foundation, Simons, who cited the 'delicacy and sensitivity' of the hand work in Warhol's early output in his show notes, transposed the artist's hand drawings into motifs that were printed or embroidered onto clothes, such as on the peplum of a cocktail number, or on the front of a flowing strapless dress.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Christian Dior

That Raf Simons intrinsically understands the Dior woman is a given. That the Belgian designer, barely installed in this grand fashion house for a year, is able to concurrently push and redefine that woman with his own signatures, while never once losing sight of the house's codes, is an even greater testament to his genius. For Fall, Simons shone the spotlight on art, particularly the themes of Surrealism and Pop, touching on a little know career fact about Christian Dior - that the master couturier began his career as a gallerist, representing the likes of Dali and Giacometti. Simons pointed out a connection between the master couturier and himself: their mutual love for 'retro' art - Dior with the Belle Époque and Simons with Mid-Century modern. Simons' 'visual scrapbook' of looks saw elegant tailoring being presented alongside softer crochet knits and wispy silk shifts. Also in the mix was a softer take on the famous bar jacket - now in wool denim and paired with flowing wide-leg trousers - while Dior's iconic houndstooth pattern appeared quite effectively on bustier dresses. Collaborating with the Andy Warhol Foundation, Simons, who cited the 'delicacy and sensitivity' of the hand work in Warhol's early output in his show notes, transposed the artist's hand drawings into motifs that were printed or embroidered onto clothes, such as on the peplum of a cocktail number, or on the front of a flowing strapless dress.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Maison Martin Margiela

Wearable clothes from Maison Martin Margiela? That's like asking Picasso to paint by numbers. However impossible the feat, the MMM team did just that for Fall, sending out the most normal-looking clothes to ever grace the Belgian company's runways. The silhouette, always a key message each season, was based on wide, oversized trousers. With these voluminous columns, Margiela proposed sleeveless coats and net-like knitwear flecked in bright hues. Round-shouldered jackets and men's white shirts had blown-up cuffs streaked with thick strokes of paint, while sheer overlays caged up bursts of colourful wool embroideries. Normally a festival of eccentricity, the most witty thing that happened during the entire proceeding was the models' hair - tucked into the back flaps of coats like a seat belt. We loved it, but the collection would have made even more of an impact with a bigger dose of quirk.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Maison Martin Margiela

Wearable clothes from Maison Martin Margiela? That's like asking Picasso to paint by numbers. However impossible the feat, the MMM team did just that for Fall, sending out the most normal-looking clothes to ever grace the Belgian company's runways. The silhouette, always a key message each season, was based on wide, oversized trousers. With these voluminous columns, Margiela proposed sleeveless coats and net-like knitwear flecked in bright hues. Round-shouldered jackets and men's white shirts had blown-up cuffs streaked with thick strokes of paint, while sheer overlays caged up bursts of colourful wool embroideries. Normally a festival of eccentricity, the most witty thing that happened during the entire proceeding was the models' hair - tucked into the back flaps of coats like a seat belt. We loved it, but the collection would have made even more of an impact with a bigger dose of quirk.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Maison Martin Margiela

Wearable clothes from Maison Martin Margiela? That's like asking Picasso to paint by numbers. However impossible the feat, the MMM team did just that for Fall, sending out the most normal-looking clothes to ever grace the Belgian company's runways. The silhouette, always a key message each season, was based on wide, oversized trousers. With these voluminous columns, Margiela proposed sleeveless coats and net-like knitwear flecked in bright hues. Round-shouldered jackets and men's white shirts had blown-up cuffs streaked with thick strokes of paint, while sheer overlays caged up bursts of colourful wool embroideries. Normally a festival of eccentricity, the most witty thing that happened during the entire proceeding was the models' hair - tucked into the back flaps of coats like a seat belt. We loved it, but the collection would have made even more of an impact with a bigger dose of quirk.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Maison Martin Margiela

Wearable clothes from Maison Martin Margiela? That's like asking Picasso to paint by numbers. However impossible the feat, the MMM team did just that for Fall, sending out the most normal-looking clothes to ever grace the Belgian company's runways. The silhouette, always a key message each season, was based on wide, oversized trousers. With these voluminous columns, Margiela proposed sleeveless coats and net-like knitwear flecked in bright hues. Round-shouldered jackets and men's white shirts had blown-up cuffs streaked with thick strokes of paint, while sheer overlays caged up bursts of colourful wool embroideries. Normally a festival of eccentricity, the most witty thing that happened during the entire proceeding was the models' hair - tucked into the back flaps of coats like a seat belt. We loved it, but the collection would have made even more of an impact with a bigger dose of quirk.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Maison Martin Margiela

Wearable clothes from Maison Martin Margiela? That's like asking Picasso to paint by numbers. However impossible the feat, the MMM team did just that for Fall, sending out the most normal-looking clothes to ever grace the Belgian company's runways. The silhouette, always a key message each season, was based on wide, oversized trousers. With these voluminous columns, Margiela proposed sleeveless coats and net-like knitwear flecked in bright hues. Round-shouldered jackets and men's white shirts had blown-up cuffs streaked with thick strokes of paint, while sheer overlays caged up bursts of colourful wool embroideries. Normally a festival of eccentricity, the most witty thing that happened during the entire proceeding was the models' hair - tucked into the back flaps of coats like a seat belt. We loved it, but the collection would have made even more of an impact with a bigger dose of quirk.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Junya Watanabe

For fall, Junya Watanabe went on a patch-tastic adventure that proved he is the master of collaging. The Japanese designer opened with a series of long-sleeved wool and tweed dresses with flipped, curved hems and leather biker jackets. The hybrid concoctions are his speciality and he ran with the theme in an ever increasingly complex, punk-infused way, before applying it to the most accessible of all fashion items - jeanswear. In Watanabe's world however, denim is anything but basic. Cut roomy around the hips and pegged right above the ankle, the voluminous jeans were patchworks of plaids, tartans and men’s shirting squares cut into an antique denim base. Paired with sweeping peach or bright red tweed coats, the vibe bordered almost on alternative folksy - especially with the nutty piles of ratty curled hair. But Watanabe shrewdly countered the undone tone with his elegant accessories – the models wore posh, pointed stilettos and boxy Amazona handbags crafted by Spanish leather goods maker Loewe. In fact, Loewe produced several pieces shown on the runway, including a jacket, dress and shoulder bags, all designed by Watanabe. Watch out for a capsule collection from the two brands, due to hit stores next September.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Junya Watanabe

For fall, Junya Watanabe went on a patch-tastic adventure that proved he is the master of collaging. The Japanese designer opened with a series of long-sleeved wool and tweed dresses with flipped, curved hems and leather biker jackets. The hybrid concoctions are his speciality and he ran with the theme in an ever increasingly complex, punk-infused way, before applying it to the most accessible of all fashion items - jeanswear. In Watanabe's world however, denim is anything but basic. Cut roomy around the hips and pegged right above the ankle, the voluminous jeans were patchworks of plaids, tartans and men’s shirting squares cut into an antique denim base. Paired with sweeping peach or bright red tweed coats, the vibe bordered almost on alternative folksy - especially with the nutty piles of ratty curled hair. But Watanabe shrewdly countered the undone tone with his elegant accessories – the models wore posh, pointed stilettos and boxy Amazona handbags crafted by Spanish leather goods maker Loewe. In fact, Loewe produced several pieces shown on the runway, including a jacket, dress and shoulder bags, all designed by Watanabe. Watch out for a capsule collection from the two brands, due to hit stores next September.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Junya Watanabe

For fall, Junya Watanabe went on a patch-tastic adventure that proved he is the master of collaging. The Japanese designer opened with a series of long-sleeved wool and tweed dresses with flipped, curved hems and leather biker jackets. The hybrid concoctions are his speciality and he ran with the theme in an ever increasingly complex, punk-infused way, before applying it to the most accessible of all fashion items - jeanswear. In Watanabe's world however, denim is anything but basic. Cut roomy around the hips and pegged right above the ankle, the voluminous jeans were patchworks of plaids, tartans and men’s shirting squares cut into an antique denim base. Paired with sweeping peach or bright red tweed coats, the vibe bordered almost on alternative folksy - especially with the nutty piles of ratty curled hair. But Watanabe shrewdly countered the undone tone with his elegant accessories – the models wore posh, pointed stilettos and boxy Amazona handbags crafted by Spanish leather goods maker Loewe. In fact, Loewe produced several pieces shown on the runway, including a jacket, dress and shoulder bags, all designed by Watanabe. Watch out for a capsule collection from the two brands, due to hit stores next September.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Junya Watanabe

For fall, Junya Watanabe went on a patch-tastic adventure that proved he is the master of collaging. The Japanese designer opened with a series of long-sleeved wool and tweed dresses with flipped, curved hems and leather biker jackets. The hybrid concoctions are his speciality and he ran with the theme in an ever increasingly complex, punk-infused way, before applying it to the most accessible of all fashion items - jeanswear. In Watanabe's world however, denim is anything but basic. Cut roomy around the hips and pegged right above the ankle, the voluminous jeans were patchworks of plaids, tartans and men’s shirting squares cut into an antique denim base. Paired with sweeping peach or bright red tweed coats, the vibe bordered almost on alternative folksy - especially with the nutty piles of ratty curled hair. But Watanabe shrewdly countered the undone tone with his elegant accessories – the models wore posh, pointed stilettos and boxy Amazona handbags crafted by Spanish leather goods maker Loewe. In fact, Loewe produced several pieces shown on the runway, including a jacket, dress and shoulder bags, all designed by Watanabe. Watch out for a capsule collection from the two brands, due to hit stores next September.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Junya Watanabe

For fall, Junya Watanabe went on a patch-tastic adventure that proved he is the master of collaging. The Japanese designer opened with a series of long-sleeved wool and tweed dresses with flipped, curved hems and leather biker jackets. The hybrid concoctions are his speciality and he ran with the theme in an ever increasingly complex, punk-infused way, before applying it to the most accessible of all fashion items - jeanswear. In Watanabe's world however, denim is anything but basic. Cut roomy around the hips and pegged right above the ankle, the voluminous jeans were patchworks of plaids, tartans and men’s shirting squares cut into an antique denim base. Paired with sweeping peach or bright red tweed coats, the vibe bordered almost on alternative folksy - especially with the nutty piles of ratty curled hair. But Watanabe shrewdly countered the undone tone with his elegant accessories – the models wore posh, pointed stilettos and boxy Amazona handbags crafted by Spanish leather goods maker Loewe. In fact, Loewe produced several pieces shown on the runway, including a jacket, dress and shoulder bags, all designed by Watanabe. Watch out for a capsule collection from the two brands, due to hit stores next September.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Haider Ackermann

Haider Ackermann's message of sober elegance began at the head this season where he bleached all of his models' dark locks with white powder. With this blizzard treatment, the models took on the guise of otherworldly birds trapped under swathes of heavy felts, wools and herringbones. Though Ackermann's typical material of choice is stiffened, jewel-toned satin, this season he eschewed that precious regal elegance and instead cut from the masculine fabrics we are seeing abundantly this season. This gave the collection a more toned down - even sporty - base and a whole new, powerful look. It also allowed for pieces to be worn separately - a completely unprecedented concept for this designer. Oversized knit sweaters, mottled leather coats and matching pants cut from herringbone all seem destined to fly out of stores and into our wardrobes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Haider Ackermann

Haider Ackermann's message of sober elegance began at the head this season where he bleached all of his models' dark locks with white powder. With this blizzard treatment, the models took on the guise of otherworldly birds trapped under swathes of heavy felts, wools and herringbones. Though Ackermann's typical material of choice is stiffened, jewel-toned satin, this season he eschewed that precious regal elegance and instead cut from the masculine fabrics we are seeing abundantly this season. This gave the collection a more toned down - even sporty - base and a whole new, powerful look. It also allowed for pieces to be worn separately - a completely unprecedented concept for this designer. Oversized knit sweaters, mottled leather coats and matching pants cut from herringbone all seem destined to fly out of stores and into our wardrobes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Haider Ackermann

Haider Ackermann's message of sober elegance began at the head this season where he bleached all of his models' dark locks with white powder. With this blizzard treatment, the models took on the guise of otherworldly birds trapped under swathes of heavy felts, wools and herringbones. Though Ackermann's typical material of choice is stiffened, jewel-toned satin, this season he eschewed that precious regal elegance and instead cut from the masculine fabrics we are seeing abundantly this season. This gave the collection a more toned down - even sporty - base and a whole new, powerful look. It also allowed for pieces to be worn separately - a completely unprecedented concept for this designer. Oversized knit sweaters, mottled leather coats and matching pants cut from herringbone all seem destined to fly out of stores and into our wardrobes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Haider Ackermann

Haider Ackermann's message of sober elegance began at the head this season where he bleached all of his models' dark locks with white powder. With this blizzard treatment, the models took on the guise of otherworldly birds trapped under swathes of heavy felts, wools and herringbones. Though Ackermann's typical material of choice is stiffened, jewel-toned satin, this season he eschewed that precious regal elegance and instead cut from the masculine fabrics we are seeing abundantly this season. This gave the collection a more toned down - even sporty - base and a whole new, powerful look. It also allowed for pieces to be worn separately - a completely unprecedented concept for this designer. Oversized knit sweaters, mottled leather coats and matching pants cut from herringbone all seem destined to fly out of stores and into our wardrobes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Haider Ackermann

Haider Ackermann's message of sober elegance began at the head this season where he bleached all of his models' dark locks with white powder. With this blizzard treatment, the models took on the guise of otherworldly birds trapped under swathes of heavy felts, wools and herringbones. Though Ackermann's typical material of choice is stiffened, jewel-toned satin, this season he eschewed that precious regal elegance and instead cut from the masculine fabrics we are seeing abundantly this season. This gave the collection a more toned down - even sporty - base and a whole new, powerful look. It also allowed for pieces to be worn separately - a completely unprecedented concept for this designer. Oversized knit sweaters, mottled leather coats and matching pants cut from herringbone all seem destined to fly out of stores and into our wardrobes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Acne Studios

Acne may have begun life as a Swedish denim brand, but now that it shows its seasonal collections with fashion's big wigs in Paris the last thing you'll see on its runway is a pair of jeans. This season creative director Jonny Johansson brought on board British artist Katerina Jebb, who is known for her photocopier art, to inject creative frisson into the collection. Jebb scanned historical garments found in the Musée Galliera and used them to create photomontages that were then turned into prints. The concept was an intriguing one but got tricky and obscured at times on garments that were teeming with mixed media elements. Acne's best pieces were those that kept it clean and simple: like the cropped shearling and leather jackets bonded to neoprene that gave their bodies an armour-like build, or the wool felt outerwear with graphic blocks of metallic leather.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Acne Studios

Acne may have begun life as a Swedish denim brand, but now that it shows its seasonal collections with fashion's big wigs in Paris the last thing you'll see on its runway is a pair of jeans. This season creative director Jonny Johansson brought on board British artist Katerina Jebb, who is known for her photocopier art, to inject creative frisson into the collection. Jebb scanned historical garments found in the Musée Galliera and used them to create photomontages that were then turned into prints. The concept was an intriguing one but got tricky and obscured at times on garments that were teeming with mixed media elements. Acne's best pieces were those that kept it clean and simple: like the cropped shearling and leather jackets bonded to neoprene that gave their bodies an armour-like build, or the wool felt outerwear with graphic blocks of metallic leather.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Acne Studios

Acne may have begun life as a Swedish denim brand, but now that it shows its seasonal collections with fashion's big wigs in Paris the last thing you'll see on its runway is a pair of jeans. This season creative director Jonny Johansson brought on board British artist Katerina Jebb, who is known for her photocopier art, to inject creative frisson into the collection. Jebb scanned historical garments found in the Musée Galliera and used them to create photomontages that were then turned into prints. The concept was an intriguing one but got tricky and obscured at times on garments that were teeming with mixed media elements. Acne's best pieces were those that kept it clean and simple: like the cropped shearling and leather jackets bonded to neoprene that gave their bodies an armour-like build, or the wool felt outerwear with graphic blocks of metallic leather.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Acne Studios

Acne may have begun life as a Swedish denim brand, but now that it shows its seasonal collections with fashion's big wigs in Paris the last thing you'll see on its runway is a pair of jeans. This season creative director Jonny Johansson brought on board British artist Katerina Jebb, who is known for her photocopier art, to inject creative frisson into the collection. Jebb scanned historical garments found in the Musée Galliera and used them to create photomontages that were then turned into prints. The concept was an intriguing one but got tricky and obscured at times on garments that were teeming with mixed media elements. Acne's best pieces were those that kept it clean and simple: like the cropped shearling and leather jackets bonded to neoprene that gave their bodies an armour-like build, or the wool felt outerwear with graphic blocks of metallic leather.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Acne Studios

Acne may have begun life as a Swedish denim brand, but now that it shows its seasonal collections with fashion's big wigs in Paris the last thing you'll see on its runway is a pair of jeans. This season creative director Jonny Johansson brought on board British artist Katerina Jebb, who is known for her photocopier art, to inject creative frisson into the collection. Jebb scanned historical garments found in the Musée Galliera and used them to create photomontages that were then turned into prints. The concept was an intriguing one but got tricky and obscured at times on garments that were teeming with mixed media elements. Acne's best pieces were those that kept it clean and simple: like the cropped shearling and leather jackets bonded to neoprene that gave their bodies an armour-like build, or the wool felt outerwear with graphic blocks of metallic leather.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Comme des Garçons

Construction and deconstruction are almost always at the heart of a Comme des Garçons collection. The real revelation is how Rei Kawakubo deftly redefines them each season. For her latest outing, she took to breaking down the traditional menswear suit (pinstripe, herringbone or houndstooth), along with its accompaniments (waistcoats, overcoats and white shirts) and then inflated the pieces to new extreme proportions. Kawakubo used rosettes as her main decorative motif, creating huge whorls of felted wool first on the series of black and white houndstooth jackets and later using them to create regal trains off the back of trousers. When it wasn't rosettes, she opted instead for slivers of thin felt fabric built up into huge piles that resembled mountains of leaves. Other jackets looked like water balloons had been inserted under the fabric, creating playful, bulging volumes around the shoulders and along the arms. In the sombre palette of dark greys and blacks, the concept was compelling enough, but it was when Kawakubo reprised the models in technicolour bursts of floral-infused prints that the collection really came to life.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Comme des Garçons

Construction and deconstruction are almost always at the heart of a Comme des Garçons collection. The real revelation is how Rei Kawakubo deftly redefines them each season. For her latest outing, she took to breaking down the traditional menswear suit (pinstripe, herringbone or houndstooth), along with its accompaniments (waistcoats, overcoats and white shirts) and then inflated the pieces to new extreme proportions. Kawakubo used rosettes as her main decorative motif, creating huge whorls of felted wool first on the series of black and white houndstooth jackets and later using them to create regal trains off the back of trousers. When it wasn't rosettes, she opted instead for slivers of thin felt fabric built up into huge piles that resembled mountains of leaves. Other jackets looked like water balloons had been inserted under the fabric, creating playful, bulging volumes around the shoulders and along the arms. In the sombre palette of dark greys and blacks, the concept was compelling enough, but it was when Kawakubo reprised the models in technicolour bursts of floral-infused prints that the collection really came to life.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Comme des Garçons

Construction and deconstruction are almost always at the heart of a Comme des Garçons collection. The real revelation is how Rei Kawakubo deftly redefines them each season. For her latest outing, she took to breaking down the traditional menswear suit (pinstripe, herringbone or houndstooth), along with its accompaniments (waistcoats, overcoats and white shirts) and then inflated the pieces to new extreme proportions. Kawakubo used rosettes as her main decorative motif, creating huge whorls of felted wool first on the series of black and white houndstooth jackets and later using them to create regal trains off the back of trousers. When it wasn't rosettes, she opted instead for slivers of thin felt fabric built up into huge piles that resembled mountains of leaves. Other jackets looked like water balloons had been inserted under the fabric, creating playful, bulging volumes around the shoulders and along the arms. In the sombre palette of dark greys and blacks, the concept was compelling enough, but it was when Kawakubo reprised the models in technicolour bursts of floral-infused prints that the collection really came to life.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Comme des Garçons

Construction and deconstruction are almost always at the heart of a Comme des Garçons collection. The real revelation is how Rei Kawakubo deftly redefines them each season. For her latest outing, she took to breaking down the traditional menswear suit (pinstripe, herringbone or houndstooth), along with its accompaniments (waistcoats, overcoats and white shirts) and then inflated the pieces to new extreme proportions. Kawakubo used rosettes as her main decorative motif, creating huge whorls of felted wool first on the series of black and white houndstooth jackets and later using them to create regal trains off the back of trousers. When it wasn't rosettes, she opted instead for slivers of thin felt fabric built up into huge piles that resembled mountains of leaves. Other jackets looked like water balloons had been inserted under the fabric, creating playful, bulging volumes around the shoulders and along the arms. In the sombre palette of dark greys and blacks, the concept was compelling enough, but it was when Kawakubo reprised the models in technicolour bursts of floral-infused prints that the collection really came to life.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Comme des Garçons

Construction and deconstruction are almost always at the heart of a Comme des Garçons collection. The real revelation is how Rei Kawakubo deftly redefines them each season. For her latest outing, she took to breaking down the traditional menswear suit (pinstripe, herringbone or houndstooth), along with its accompaniments (waistcoats, overcoats and white shirts) and then inflated the pieces to new extreme proportions. Kawakubo used rosettes as her main decorative motif, creating huge whorls of felted wool first on the series of black and white houndstooth jackets and later using them to create regal trains off the back of trousers. When it wasn't rosettes, she opted instead for slivers of thin felt fabric built up into huge piles that resembled mountains of leaves. Other jackets looked like water balloons had been inserted under the fabric, creating playful, bulging volumes around the shoulders and along the arms. In the sombre palette of dark greys and blacks, the concept was compelling enough, but it was when Kawakubo reprised the models in technicolour bursts of floral-infused prints that the collection really came to life.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Loewe

Fur and leather are enduring staples at Loewe where creative director Stuart Vevers relishes digging into the house’s vast coffers of luxe materials. This season he set a new tone right from the first look: an oversized black and navy fur coat woven with diagonal strips of leather and different shag lengths. The effect was a carpet coat that somehow managed the unlikely feat of being functional, modern and sexy at the same time. The rest of the show unfolded to an equally well-balanced tune: a beautiful tailleur was cut from stiffened leather, giving it new, ladylike proportions with its rounded arms and voluminous silhouette. Patterns were used sparingly but to great effect in the form of foulard prints and kaleidoscopic florals, while knee-length coats featured bright, geometric panelling.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Loewe

Fur and leather are enduring staples at Loewe where creative director Stuart Vevers relishes digging into the house’s vast coffers of luxe materials. This season he set a new tone right from the first look: an oversized black and navy fur coat woven with diagonal strips of leather and different shag lengths. The effect was a carpet coat that somehow managed the unlikely feat of being functional, modern and sexy at the same time. The rest of the show unfolded to an equally well-balanced tune: a beautiful tailleur was cut from stiffened leather, giving it new, ladylike proportions with its rounded arms and voluminous silhouette. Patterns were used sparingly but to great effect in the form of foulard prints and kaleidoscopic florals, while knee-length coats featured bright, geometric panelling.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Loewe

Fur and leather are enduring staples at Loewe where creative director Stuart Vevers relishes digging into the house’s vast coffers of luxe materials. This season he set a new tone right from the first look: an oversized black and navy fur coat woven with diagonal strips of leather and different shag lengths. The effect was a carpet coat that somehow managed the unlikely feat of being functional, modern and sexy at the same time. The rest of the show unfolded to an equally well-balanced tune: a beautiful tailleur was cut from stiffened leather, giving it new, ladylike proportions with its rounded arms and voluminous silhouette. Patterns were used sparingly but to great effect in the form of foulard prints and kaleidoscopic florals, while knee-length coats featured bright, geometric panelling.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Loewe

Fur and leather are enduring staples at Loewe where creative director Stuart Vevers relishes digging into the house’s vast coffers of luxe materials. This season he set a new tone right from the first look: an oversized black and navy fur coat woven with diagonal strips of leather and different shag lengths. The effect was a carpet coat that somehow managed the unlikely feat of being functional, modern and sexy at the same time. The rest of the show unfolded to an equally well-balanced tune: a beautiful tailleur was cut from stiffened leather, giving it new, ladylike proportions with its rounded arms and voluminous silhouette. Patterns were used sparingly but to great effect in the form of foulard prints and kaleidoscopic florals, while knee-length coats featured bright, geometric panelling.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Loewe

Fur and leather are enduring staples at Loewe where creative director Stuart Vevers relishes digging into the house’s vast coffers of luxe materials. This season he set a new tone right from the first look: an oversized black and navy fur coat woven with diagonal strips of leather and different shag lengths. The effect was a carpet coat that somehow managed the unlikely feat of being functional, modern and sexy at the same time. The rest of the show unfolded to an equally well-balanced tune: a beautiful tailleur was cut from stiffened leather, giving it new, ladylike proportions with its rounded arms and voluminous silhouette. Patterns were used sparingly but to great effect in the form of foulard prints and kaleidoscopic florals, while knee-length coats featured bright, geometric panelling.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Kenzo

Carol Lim and Humberto Leon turned to the East for Fall, mining ancient Asian temples of India, Nepal and China for the patterns scattered across the Kenzo runway. Some of these prints were the best things about the show - especially a brilliant beaming-eye motif that tumbled across garments in swirls of black and white. Embossed silks also created a fun faux-croc effect on miniskirt suits with matching jackets. When the patterns worked to beef up kimono jackets or mini wrap skirts, the effect was potent, but the concept got lost on the fluid silks and this collection, unlike past seasons, did not possess a cohesive, powerful core. In the end, however, Kenzo's new emphasis on sporty, courtesy of Lim and Leon, means it's all about the separates anyway. And customers will find plenty to pick from the mix, including bomber jackets with exaggerated rounded shoulders, curve-front coats and the metallic jacquards that opened the show.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Kenzo

Carol Lim and Humberto Leon turned to the East for Fall, mining ancient Asian temples of India, Nepal and China for the patterns scattered across the Kenzo runway. Some of these prints were the best things about the show - especially a brilliant beaming-eye motif that tumbled across garments in swirls of black and white. Embossed silks also created a fun faux-croc effect on miniskirt suits with matching jackets. When the patterns worked to beef up kimono jackets or mini wrap skirts, the effect was potent, but the concept got lost on the fluid silks and this collection, unlike past seasons, did not possess a cohesive, powerful core. In the end, however, Kenzo's new emphasis on sporty, courtesy of Lim and Leon, means it's all about the separates anyway. And customers will find plenty to pick from the mix, including bomber jackets with exaggerated rounded shoulders, curve-front coats and the metallic jacquards that opened the show.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Kenzo

Carol Lim and Humberto Leon turned to the East for Fall, mining ancient Asian temples of India, Nepal and China for the patterns scattered across the Kenzo runway. Some of these prints were the best things about the show - especially a brilliant beaming-eye motif that tumbled across garments in swirls of black and white. Embossed silks also created a fun faux-croc effect on miniskirt suits with matching jackets. When the patterns worked to beef up kimono jackets or mini wrap skirts, the effect was potent, but the concept got lost on the fluid silks and this collection, unlike past seasons, did not possess a cohesive, powerful core. In the end, however, Kenzo's new emphasis on sporty, courtesy of Lim and Leon, means it's all about the separates anyway. And customers will find plenty to pick from the mix, including bomber jackets with exaggerated rounded shoulders, curve-front coats and the metallic jacquards that opened the show.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Kenzo

Carol Lim and Humberto Leon turned to the East for Fall, mining ancient Asian temples of India, Nepal and China for the patterns scattered across the Kenzo runway. Some of these prints were the best things about the show - especially a brilliant beaming-eye motif that tumbled across garments in swirls of black and white. Embossed silks also created a fun faux-croc effect on miniskirt suits with matching jackets. When the patterns worked to beef up kimono jackets or mini wrap skirts, the effect was potent, but the concept got lost on the fluid silks and this collection, unlike past seasons, did not possess a cohesive, powerful core. In the end, however, Kenzo's new emphasis on sporty, courtesy of Lim and Leon, means it's all about the separates anyway. And customers will find plenty to pick from the mix, including bomber jackets with exaggerated rounded shoulders, curve-front coats and the metallic jacquards that opened the show.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Kenzo

Carol Lim and Humberto Leon turned to the East for Fall, mining ancient Asian temples of India, Nepal and China for the patterns scattered across the Kenzo runway. Some of these prints were the best things about the show - especially a brilliant beaming-eye motif that tumbled across garments in swirls of black and white. Embossed silks also created a fun faux-croc effect on miniskirt suits with matching jackets. When the patterns worked to beef up kimono jackets or mini wrap skirts, the effect was potent, but the concept got lost on the fluid silks and this collection, unlike past seasons, did not possess a cohesive, powerful core. In the end, however, Kenzo's new emphasis on sporty, courtesy of Lim and Leon, means it's all about the separates anyway. And customers will find plenty to pick from the mix, including bomber jackets with exaggerated rounded shoulders, curve-front coats and the metallic jacquards that opened the show.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Céline

If there was a case for wearing felted wool next season, the most convincing argument was delivered by Phoebe Philo and her superb collection for Céline. Razor sharp in its focus, Philo's collection took to softness this season, embracing it completely and wholeheartedly for perhaps the first time. While in past seasons her unique cutting and rigorous shapes have largely been constructed from rigid fabrics, this time Philo took to ultra-soft, luxuriously spun reams of bumpy, textured or totally flat wool. But despite the pliancy of her core fabric, the designer still managed to create the extremely well defined silhouettes for which she is known. This season it was all about the slim-hipped flared skirt paired with a boxy, buttonless top. Presented in coordinated materials, the sets gave the neat, polished feeling of a tailleur, without the stuffiness of a jacket. The palette encompassed buttery creams and netural greys before jumping into picnic-tablecloth plaids and tartans woven in red, white and blue or black. Not a single misstep was made in this brilliant, calibrated collection, a modern and completely fresh proposal that got our mouths watering for glamorous yet subtle looks to wear right this moment.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Céline

If there was a case for wearing felted wool next season, the most convincing argument was delivered by Phoebe Philo and her superb collection for Céline. Razor sharp in its focus, Philo's collection took to softness this season, embracing it completely and wholeheartedly for perhaps the first time. While in past seasons her unique cutting and rigorous shapes have largely been constructed from rigid fabrics, this time Philo took to ultra-soft, luxuriously spun reams of bumpy, textured or totally flat wool. But despite the pliancy of her core fabric, the designer still managed to create the extremely well defined silhouettes for which she is known. This season it was all about the slim-hipped flared skirt paired with a boxy, buttonless top. Presented in coordinated materials, the sets gave the neat, polished feeling of a tailleur, without the stuffiness of a jacket. The palette encompassed buttery creams and netural greys before jumping into picnic-tablecloth plaids and tartans woven in red, white and blue or black. Not a single misstep was made in this brilliant, calibrated collection, a modern and completely fresh proposal that got our mouths watering for glamorous yet subtle looks to wear right this moment.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Céline

If there was a case for wearing felted wool next season, the most convincing argument was delivered by Phoebe Philo and her superb collection for Céline. Razor sharp in its focus, Philo's collection took to softness this season, embracing it completely and wholeheartedly for perhaps the first time. While in past seasons her unique cutting and rigorous shapes have largely been constructed from rigid fabrics, this time Philo took to ultra-soft, luxuriously spun reams of bumpy, textured or totally flat wool. But despite the pliancy of her core fabric, the designer still managed to create the extremely well defined silhouettes for which she is known. This season it was all about the slim-hipped flared skirt paired with a boxy, buttonless top. Presented in coordinated materials, the sets gave the neat, polished feeling of a tailleur, without the stuffiness of a jacket. The palette encompassed buttery creams and netural greys before jumping into picnic-tablecloth plaids and tartans woven in red, white and blue or black. Not a single misstep was made in this brilliant, calibrated collection, a modern and completely fresh proposal that got our mouths watering for glamorous yet subtle looks to wear right this moment.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Céline

If there was a case for wearing felted wool next season, the most convincing argument was delivered by Phoebe Philo and her superb collection for Céline. Razor sharp in its focus, Philo's collection took to softness this season, embracing it completely and wholeheartedly for perhaps the first time. While in past seasons her unique cutting and rigorous shapes have largely been constructed from rigid fabrics, this time Philo took to ultra-soft, luxuriously spun reams of bumpy, textured or totally flat wool. But despite the pliancy of her core fabric, the designer still managed to create the extremely well defined silhouettes for which she is known. This season it was all about the slim-hipped flared skirt paired with a boxy, buttonless top. Presented in coordinated materials, the sets gave the neat, polished feeling of a tailleur, without the stuffiness of a jacket. The palette encompassed buttery creams and netural greys before jumping into picnic-tablecloth plaids and tartans woven in red, white and blue or black. Not a single misstep was made in this brilliant, calibrated collection, a modern and completely fresh proposal that got our mouths watering for glamorous yet subtle looks to wear right this moment.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Céline

If there was a case for wearing felted wool next season, the most convincing argument was delivered by Phoebe Philo and her superb collection for Céline. Razor sharp in its focus, Philo's collection took to softness this season, embracing it completely and wholeheartedly for perhaps the first time. While in past seasons her unique cutting and rigorous shapes have largely been constructed from rigid fabrics, this time Philo took to ultra-soft, luxuriously spun reams of bumpy, textured or totally flat wool. But despite the pliancy of her core fabric, the designer still managed to create the extremely well defined silhouettes for which she is known. This season it was all about the slim-hipped flared skirt paired with a boxy, buttonless top. Presented in coordinated materials, the sets gave the neat, polished feeling of a tailleur, without the stuffiness of a jacket. The palette encompassed buttery creams and netural greys before jumping into picnic-tablecloth plaids and tartans woven in red, white and blue or black. Not a single misstep was made in this brilliant, calibrated collection, a modern and completely fresh proposal that got our mouths watering for glamorous yet subtle looks to wear right this moment.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Chloé

Boy. Girl. Baby. All three appeared in either form or spirit on the Chloé runway in what has become creative director Claire Waight Keller's best outing yet. If the mix of age and gender sounds odd, it wasn't, thanks to a subtle mixology that made these labels completely irrelevant yet powerfully functional. The childlike component came in the form of baby-boy collars (on mannish white shirting), bib fronts and apron dress constructions whose criss-cross straps and low scooped fronts recalled romper-room wear - yet these details were wrapped up with rock-solid grown-up cohesion. The mannish culottes, boyfriend sweatshirts and cropped pants openly flirted with feminine counterpoints, the roots of this historic French brand. Everything, from sheer dot-point blouses and lipstick-red pinafore dresses to the confetti-tweed skirt that unzipped to reveal a flash of seafoam green, underlined the undeniable womanliness.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Chloé

Boy. Girl. Baby. All three appeared in either form or spirit on the Chloé runway in what has become creative director Claire Waight Keller's best outing yet. If the mix of age and gender sounds odd, it wasn't, thanks to a subtle mixology that made these labels completely irrelevant yet powerfully functional. The childlike component came in the form of baby-boy collars (on mannish white shirting), bib fronts and apron dress constructions whose criss-cross straps and low scooped fronts recalled romper-room wear - yet these details were wrapped up with rock-solid grown-up cohesion. The mannish culottes, boyfriend sweatshirts and cropped pants openly flirted with feminine counterpoints, the roots of this historic French brand. Everything, from sheer dot-point blouses and lipstick-red pinafore dresses to the confetti-tweed skirt that unzipped to reveal a flash of seafoam green, underlined the undeniable womanliness.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Chloé

Boy. Girl. Baby. All three appeared in either form or spirit on the Chloé runway in what has become creative director Claire Waight Keller's best outing yet. If the mix of age and gender sounds odd, it wasn't, thanks to a subtle mixology that made these labels completely irrelevant yet powerfully functional. The childlike component came in the form of baby-boy collars (on mannish white shirting), bib fronts and apron dress constructions whose criss-cross straps and low scooped fronts recalled romper-room wear - yet these details were wrapped up with rock-solid grown-up cohesion. The mannish culottes, boyfriend sweatshirts and cropped pants openly flirted with feminine counterpoints, the roots of this historic French brand. Everything, from sheer dot-point blouses and lipstick-red pinafore dresses to the confetti-tweed skirt that unzipped to reveal a flash of seafoam green, underlined the undeniable womanliness.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Chloé

Boy. Girl. Baby. All three appeared in either form or spirit on the Chloé runway in what has become creative director Claire Waight Keller's best outing yet. If the mix of age and gender sounds odd, it wasn't, thanks to a subtle mixology that made these labels completely irrelevant yet powerfully functional. The childlike component came in the form of baby-boy collars (on mannish white shirting), bib fronts and apron dress constructions whose criss-cross straps and low scooped fronts recalled romper-room wear - yet these details were wrapped up with rock-solid grown-up cohesion. The mannish culottes, boyfriend sweatshirts and cropped pants openly flirted with feminine counterpoints, the roots of this historic French brand. Everything, from sheer dot-point blouses and lipstick-red pinafore dresses to the confetti-tweed skirt that unzipped to reveal a flash of seafoam green, underlined the undeniable womanliness.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Chloé

Boy. Girl. Baby. All three appeared in either form or spirit on the Chloé runway in what has become creative director Claire Waight Keller's best outing yet. If the mix of age and gender sounds odd, it wasn't, thanks to a subtle mixology that made these labels completely irrelevant yet powerfully functional. The childlike component came in the form of baby-boy collars (on mannish white shirting), bib fronts and apron dress constructions whose criss-cross straps and low scooped fronts recalled romper-room wear - yet these details were wrapped up with rock-solid grown-up cohesion. The mannish culottes, boyfriend sweatshirts and cropped pants openly flirted with feminine counterpoints, the roots of this historic French brand. Everything, from sheer dot-point blouses and lipstick-red pinafore dresses to the confetti-tweed skirt that unzipped to reveal a flash of seafoam green, underlined the undeniable womanliness.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Akris

It may have been dubbed 'the hidden white', but Albert Kriemler's Fall show for Akris was almost entirely crafted from pure jet black. The colourless palette made for a decidedly more formal outing for the Swiss house perhaps best known for its lethally luxurious daywear. To be fair, there were some outfits destined for daylight (if you are lunching on fine china, that is), conceived in black layers of capes, coats and stovepipe trousers in beautiful wool fleece or double-faced cashmere. But the focus was on the apéritif hour and beyond, preferably under a giant crystal chandelier in a gilded setting. For those moments, Kriemler cut every manner of cocktail attire, each more rigorously refined than the next. There were body-skimming knee-length dresses with black chiffon sleeves and backs; threaded bouclé capes in black Lurex with miniskirts; and sweeping gowns with tiny window-check holes. The real drama, however, came in the furs: ladylike suits and sweeping ball skirts all cut from rich black astrakhan.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Akris

It may have been dubbed 'the hidden white', but Albert Kriemler's Fall show for Akris was almost entirely crafted from pure jet black. The colourless palette made for a decidedly more formal outing for the Swiss house perhaps best known for its lethally luxurious daywear. To be fair, there were some outfits destined for daylight (if you are lunching on fine china, that is), conceived in black layers of capes, coats and stovepipe trousers in beautiful wool fleece or double-faced cashmere. But the focus was on the apéritif hour and beyond, preferably under a giant crystal chandelier in a gilded setting. For those moments, Kriemler cut every manner of cocktail attire, each more rigorously refined than the next. There were body-skimming knee-length dresses with black chiffon sleeves and backs; threaded bouclé capes in black Lurex with miniskirts; and sweeping gowns with tiny window-check holes. The real drama, however, came in the furs: ladylike suits and sweeping ball skirts all cut from rich black astrakhan.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Akris

It may have been dubbed 'the hidden white', but Albert Kriemler's Fall show for Akris was almost entirely crafted from pure jet black. The colourless palette made for a decidedly more formal outing for the Swiss house perhaps best known for its lethally luxurious daywear. To be fair, there were some outfits destined for daylight (if you are lunching on fine china, that is), conceived in black layers of capes, coats and stovepipe trousers in beautiful wool fleece or double-faced cashmere. But the focus was on the apéritif hour and beyond, preferably under a giant crystal chandelier in a gilded setting. For those moments, Kriemler cut every manner of cocktail attire, each more rigorously refined than the next. There were body-skimming knee-length dresses with black chiffon sleeves and backs; threaded bouclé capes in black Lurex with miniskirts; and sweeping gowns with tiny window-check holes. The real drama, however, came in the furs: ladylike suits and sweeping ball skirts all cut from rich black astrakhan.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Akris

It may have been dubbed 'the hidden white', but Albert Kriemler's Fall show for Akris was almost entirely crafted from pure jet black. The colourless palette made for a decidedly more formal outing for the Swiss house perhaps best known for its lethally luxurious daywear. To be fair, there were some outfits destined for daylight (if you are lunching on fine china, that is), conceived in black layers of capes, coats and stovepipe trousers in beautiful wool fleece or double-faced cashmere. But the focus was on the apéritif hour and beyond, preferably under a giant crystal chandelier in a gilded setting. For those moments, Kriemler cut every manner of cocktail attire, each more rigorously refined than the next. There were body-skimming knee-length dresses with black chiffon sleeves and backs; threaded bouclé capes in black Lurex with miniskirts; and sweeping gowns with tiny window-check holes. The real drama, however, came in the furs: ladylike suits and sweeping ball skirts all cut from rich black astrakhan.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Akris

It may have been dubbed 'the hidden white', but Albert Kriemler's Fall show for Akris was almost entirely crafted from pure jet black. The colourless palette made for a decidedly more formal outing for the Swiss house perhaps best known for its lethally luxurious daywear. To be fair, there were some outfits destined for daylight (if you are lunching on fine china, that is), conceived in black layers of capes, coats and stovepipe trousers in beautiful wool fleece or double-faced cashmere. But the focus was on the apéritif hour and beyond, preferably under a giant crystal chandelier in a gilded setting. For those moments, Kriemler cut every manner of cocktail attire, each more rigorously refined than the next. There were body-skimming knee-length dresses with black chiffon sleeves and backs; threaded bouclé capes in black Lurex with miniskirts; and sweeping gowns with tiny window-check holes. The real drama, however, came in the furs: ladylike suits and sweeping ball skirts all cut from rich black astrakhan.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Givenchy

Hauntingly beautiful, caught somewhere between fragility and strength, Riccardo Tisci's Fall collection for Givenchy was the fashion masterpiece of the season. It's hard to believe that this Italian designer, who calibrated every ounce of this show to perfection, once endured the wrath of fashion criticism. From the live performance of Antony and the Johnsons, accompanied by the Heritage Orchestra, to the construction of an enormous oval stage in a vast black warehouse, everything reeked of dramatic significance and careful execution. The clothes, it turned out, not only met the loftiness of the setting but surpassed it. Tisci pulled together a huge sack of influences that ranged from punk and street fashion to the highest echelons of couture. Leather biker jackets played a major role, both in padded dress constructions and in zip-off corsets that looked like giant belts over tiered peasant skirts. For decorative effect he mined plaids and tartans, then moved to a deliciously sophisticated fiery orange and yellow baroque pattern on flounce-edged pencil skirts and cropped molded jackets. The crescendo hit just as fast and furiously as the music with a shower of giant crystal embroideries on sweatshirts and long, sheer column skirts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Givenchy

Hauntingly beautiful, caught somewhere between fragility and strength, Riccardo Tisci's Fall collection for Givenchy was the fashion masterpiece of the season. It's hard to believe that this Italian designer, who calibrated every ounce of this show to perfection, once endured the wrath of fashion criticism. From the live performance of Antony and the Johnsons, accompanied by the Heritage Orchestra, to the construction of an enormous oval stage in a vast black warehouse, everything reeked of dramatic significance and careful execution. The clothes, it turned out, not only met the loftiness of the setting but surpassed it. Tisci pulled together a huge sack of influences that ranged from punk and street fashion to the highest echelons of couture. Leather biker jackets played a major role, both in padded dress constructions and in zip-off corsets that looked like giant belts over tiered peasant skirts. For decorative effect he mined plaids and tartans, then moved to a deliciously sophisticated fiery orange and yellow baroque pattern on flounce-edged pencil skirts and cropped molded jackets. The crescendo hit just as fast and furiously as the music with a shower of giant crystal embroideries on sweatshirts and long, sheer column skirts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Givenchy

Hauntingly beautiful, caught somewhere between fragility and strength, Riccardo Tisci's Fall collection for Givenchy was the fashion masterpiece of the season. It's hard to believe that this Italian designer, who calibrated every ounce of this show to perfection, once endured the wrath of fashion criticism. From the live performance of Antony and the Johnsons, accompanied by the Heritage Orchestra, to the construction of an enormous oval stage in a vast black warehouse, everything reeked of dramatic significance and careful execution. The clothes, it turned out, not only met the loftiness of the setting but surpassed it. Tisci pulled together a huge sack of influences that ranged from punk and street fashion to the highest echelons of couture. Leather biker jackets played a major role, both in padded dress constructions and in zip-off corsets that looked like giant belts over tiered peasant skirts. For decorative effect he mined plaids and tartans, then moved to a deliciously sophisticated fiery orange and yellow baroque pattern on flounce-edged pencil skirts and cropped molded jackets. The crescendo hit just as fast and furiously as the music with a shower of giant crystal embroideries on sweatshirts and long, sheer column skirts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Givenchy

Hauntingly beautiful, caught somewhere between fragility and strength, Riccardo Tisci's Fall collection for Givenchy was the fashion masterpiece of the season. It's hard to believe that this Italian designer, who calibrated every ounce of this show to perfection, once endured the wrath of fashion criticism. From the live performance of Antony and the Johnsons, accompanied by the Heritage Orchestra, to the construction of an enormous oval stage in a vast black warehouse, everything reeked of dramatic significance and careful execution. The clothes, it turned out, not only met the loftiness of the setting but surpassed it. Tisci pulled together a huge sack of influences that ranged from punk and street fashion to the highest echelons of couture. Leather biker jackets played a major role, both in padded dress constructions and in zip-off corsets that looked like giant belts over tiered peasant skirts. For decorative effect he mined plaids and tartans, then moved to a deliciously sophisticated fiery orange and yellow baroque pattern on flounce-edged pencil skirts and cropped molded jackets. The crescendo hit just as fast and furiously as the music with a shower of giant crystal embroideries on sweatshirts and long, sheer column skirts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Givenchy

Hauntingly beautiful, caught somewhere between fragility and strength, Riccardo Tisci's Fall collection for Givenchy was the fashion masterpiece of the season. It's hard to believe that this Italian designer, who calibrated every ounce of this show to perfection, once endured the wrath of fashion criticism. From the live performance of Antony and the Johnsons, accompanied by the Heritage Orchestra, to the construction of an enormous oval stage in a vast black warehouse, everything reeked of dramatic significance and careful execution. The clothes, it turned out, not only met the loftiness of the setting but surpassed it. Tisci pulled together a huge sack of influences that ranged from punk and street fashion to the highest echelons of couture. Leather biker jackets played a major role, both in padded dress constructions and in zip-off corsets that looked like giant belts over tiered peasant skirts. For decorative effect he mined plaids and tartans, then moved to a deliciously sophisticated fiery orange and yellow baroque pattern on flounce-edged pencil skirts and cropped molded jackets. The crescendo hit just as fast and furiously as the music with a shower of giant crystal embroideries on sweatshirts and long, sheer column skirts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney isn't the first designer to get bitten by the menswear bug for Fall, but she cut this collection with her uniquely modern, covetable  and wearable lens, making it all her own. Eschewing the bright feminine florals and patterns of late, McCartney cut reams of mannish chalk stripes - from fine pin varieties to sportier baseball striping - on serious navy and grey wools. With the all-business base, she crafted distinctly womanly shapes from a new elongated silhouette. There were long-sleeved mid-calf dresses and long skirts with scarf hems, plus ultra-cool hooded puffer jackets and sweatshirts - cues into this designer's facile hand with cool sportswear. Although the exaggerated mohair overcoats made a big statement for the season (especially the neon grape version that gave Karlie Kloss a Hollywood bouncer's dimensions), our favourite part was McCartney's brief flicker with elegance. Towards the end of the show she delivered a two-piece strapless top and long column skirt in a subtly-patterned silk cream jacquard. It was flawless.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney isn't the first designer to get bitten by the menswear bug for Fall, but she cut this collection with her uniquely modern, covetable  and wearable lens, making it all her own. Eschewing the bright feminine florals and patterns of late, McCartney cut reams of mannish chalk stripes - from fine pin varieties to sportier baseball striping - on serious navy and grey wools. With the all-business base, she crafted distinctly womanly shapes from a new elongated silhouette. There were long-sleeved mid-calf dresses and long skirts with scarf hems, plus ultra-cool hooded puffer jackets and sweatshirts - cues into this designer's facile hand with cool sportswear. Although the exaggerated mohair overcoats made a big statement for the season (especially the neon grape version that gave Karlie Kloss a Hollywood bouncer's dimensions), our favourite part was McCartney's brief flicker with elegance. Towards the end of the show she delivered a two-piece strapless top and long column skirt in a subtly-patterned silk cream jacquard. It was flawless.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney isn't the first designer to get bitten by the menswear bug for Fall, but she cut this collection with her uniquely modern, covetable  and wearable lens, making it all her own. Eschewing the bright feminine florals and patterns of late, McCartney cut reams of mannish chalk stripes - from fine pin varieties to sportier baseball striping - on serious navy and grey wools. With the all-business base, she crafted distinctly womanly shapes from a new elongated silhouette. There were long-sleeved mid-calf dresses and long skirts with scarf hems, plus ultra-cool hooded puffer jackets and sweatshirts - cues into this designer's facile hand with cool sportswear. Although the exaggerated mohair overcoats made a big statement for the season (especially the neon grape version that gave Karlie Kloss a Hollywood bouncer's dimensions), our favourite part was McCartney's brief flicker with elegance. Towards the end of the show she delivered a two-piece strapless top and long column skirt in a subtly-patterned silk cream jacquard. It was flawless.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney isn't the first designer to get bitten by the menswear bug for Fall, but she cut this collection with her uniquely modern, covetable  and wearable lens, making it all her own. Eschewing the bright feminine florals and patterns of late, McCartney cut reams of mannish chalk stripes - from fine pin varieties to sportier baseball striping - on serious navy and grey wools. With the all-business base, she crafted distinctly womanly shapes from a new elongated silhouette. There were long-sleeved mid-calf dresses and long skirts with scarf hems, plus ultra-cool hooded puffer jackets and sweatshirts - cues into this designer's facile hand with cool sportswear. Although the exaggerated mohair overcoats made a big statement for the season (especially the neon grape version that gave Karlie Kloss a Hollywood bouncer's dimensions), our favourite part was McCartney's brief flicker with elegance. Towards the end of the show she delivered a two-piece strapless top and long column skirt in a subtly-patterned silk cream jacquard. It was flawless.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney isn't the first designer to get bitten by the menswear bug for Fall, but she cut this collection with her uniquely modern, covetable  and wearable lens, making it all her own. Eschewing the bright feminine florals and patterns of late, McCartney cut reams of mannish chalk stripes - from fine pin varieties to sportier baseball striping - on serious navy and grey wools. With the all-business base, she crafted distinctly womanly shapes from a new elongated silhouette. There were long-sleeved mid-calf dresses and long skirts with scarf hems, plus ultra-cool hooded puffer jackets and sweatshirts - cues into this designer's facile hand with cool sportswear. Although the exaggerated mohair overcoats made a big statement for the season (especially the neon grape version that gave Karlie Kloss a Hollywood bouncer's dimensions), our favourite part was McCartney's brief flicker with elegance. Towards the end of the show she delivered a two-piece strapless top and long column skirt in a subtly-patterned silk cream jacquard. It was flawless.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Sacai

Japanese designer Chitose Abe continuously proves to be one of the most engaging players of the Paris catwalk scene. Abe is known for her fabric collages - a specialty she has been fine tuning long before this construction technique enjoyed its current trendiness. She handles her material melding with a truly expert hand - fusing high end, low end, fancy and more ignoble pieces together with a seamless effect. Abe has traditionally played with more casual fabrics but this season she moved on from her signature plaids, instead bringing rich astrakhans, minks, shearlings and glossy pony skins into the mix. The effect was dramatically elegant, and at the same time truly original, a nearly impossible feat in fashion these days.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Sacai

Japanese designer Chitose Abe continuously proves to be one of the most engaging players of the Paris catwalk scene. Abe is known for her fabric collages - a specialty she has been fine tuning long before this construction technique enjoyed its current trendiness. She handles her material melding with a truly expert hand - fusing high end, low end, fancy and more ignoble pieces together with a seamless effect. Abe has traditionally played with more casual fabrics but this season she moved on from her signature plaids, instead bringing rich astrakhans, minks, shearlings and glossy pony skins into the mix. The effect was dramatically elegant, and at the same time truly original, a nearly impossible feat in fashion these days.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Sacai

Japanese designer Chitose Abe continuously proves to be one of the most engaging players of the Paris catwalk scene. Abe is known for her fabric collages - a specialty she has been fine tuning long before this construction technique enjoyed its current trendiness. She handles her material melding with a truly expert hand - fusing high end, low end, fancy and more ignoble pieces together with a seamless effect. Abe has traditionally played with more casual fabrics but this season she moved on from her signature plaids, instead bringing rich astrakhans, minks, shearlings and glossy pony skins into the mix. The effect was dramatically elegant, and at the same time truly original, a nearly impossible feat in fashion these days.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Sacai

Japanese designer Chitose Abe continuously proves to be one of the most engaging players of the Paris catwalk scene. Abe is known for her fabric collages - a specialty she has been fine tuning long before this construction technique enjoyed its current trendiness. She handles her material melding with a truly expert hand - fusing high end, low end, fancy and more ignoble pieces together with a seamless effect. Abe has traditionally played with more casual fabrics but this season she moved on from her signature plaids, instead bringing rich astrakhans, minks, shearlings and glossy pony skins into the mix. The effect was dramatically elegant, and at the same time truly original, a nearly impossible feat in fashion these days.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Sacai

Japanese designer Chitose Abe continuously proves to be one of the most engaging players of the Paris catwalk scene. Abe is known for her fabric collages - a specialty she has been fine tuning long before this construction technique enjoyed its current trendiness. She handles her material melding with a truly expert hand - fusing high end, low end, fancy and more ignoble pieces together with a seamless effect. Abe has traditionally played with more casual fabrics but this season she moved on from her signature plaids, instead bringing rich astrakhans, minks, shearlings and glossy pony skins into the mix. The effect was dramatically elegant, and at the same time truly original, a nearly impossible feat in fashion these days.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Saint Laurent

It's been nearly two decades but Hedi Slimane felt it was high time to mine the wardrobe once worn by Kurt Cobain and his gaggle of grunge girls in his latest collection for Saint Laurent. You do remember grunge, don't you? The plaid flannel shirts, black sheer stockings tucked into flat combat or motorcycle boots, paired with bed head hair that hasn't been washed for at least a week. Underneath those layers of gritty disregard were pockets of higher-fare fashion: flirty little printed silk dresses, crystal-crusted tuxedo jackets and Swarovski stones gleaming off the black stockings. More than anything, Slimane presented a young girl's uniform which was taken straight from the underbelly of a late 1990s rave: leather or denim underpants worn over black stockings, fuzzy long mohair sweaters or slasher leather trousers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Saint Laurent

It's been nearly two decades but Hedi Slimane felt it was high time to mine the wardrobe once worn by Kurt Cobain and his gaggle of grunge girls in his latest collection for Saint Laurent. You do remember grunge, don't you? The plaid flannel shirts, black sheer stockings tucked into flat combat or motorcycle boots, paired with bed head hair that hasn't been washed for at least a week. Underneath those layers of gritty disregard were pockets of higher-fare fashion: flirty little printed silk dresses, crystal-crusted tuxedo jackets and Swarovski stones gleaming off the black stockings. More than anything, Slimane presented a young girl's uniform which was taken straight from the underbelly of a late 1990s rave: leather or denim underpants worn over black stockings, fuzzy long mohair sweaters or slasher leather trousers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Saint Laurent

It's been nearly two decades but Hedi Slimane felt it was high time to mine the wardrobe once worn by Kurt Cobain and his gaggle of grunge girls in his latest collection for Saint Laurent. You do remember grunge, don't you? The plaid flannel shirts, black sheer stockings tucked into flat combat or motorcycle boots, paired with bed head hair that hasn't been washed for at least a week. Underneath those layers of gritty disregard were pockets of higher-fare fashion: flirty little printed silk dresses, crystal-crusted tuxedo jackets and Swarovski stones gleaming off the black stockings. More than anything, Slimane presented a young girl's uniform which was taken straight from the underbelly of a late 1990s rave: leather or denim underpants worn over black stockings, fuzzy long mohair sweaters or slasher leather trousers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Saint Laurent

It's been nearly two decades but Hedi Slimane felt it was high time to mine the wardrobe once worn by Kurt Cobain and his gaggle of grunge girls in his latest collection for Saint Laurent. You do remember grunge, don't you? The plaid flannel shirts, black sheer stockings tucked into flat combat or motorcycle boots, paired with bed head hair that hasn't been washed for at least a week. Underneath those layers of gritty disregard were pockets of higher-fare fashion: flirty little printed silk dresses, crystal-crusted tuxedo jackets and Swarovski stones gleaming off the black stockings. More than anything, Slimane presented a young girl's uniform which was taken straight from the underbelly of a late 1990s rave: leather or denim underpants worn over black stockings, fuzzy long mohair sweaters or slasher leather trousers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Saint Laurent

It's been nearly two decades but Hedi Slimane felt it was high time to mine the wardrobe once worn by Kurt Cobain and his gaggle of grunge girls in his latest collection for Saint Laurent. You do remember grunge, don't you? The plaid flannel shirts, black sheer stockings tucked into flat combat or motorcycle boots, paired with bed head hair that hasn't been washed for at least a week. Underneath those layers of gritty disregard were pockets of higher-fare fashion: flirty little printed silk dresses, crystal-crusted tuxedo jackets and Swarovski stones gleaming off the black stockings. More than anything, Slimane presented a young girl's uniform which was taken straight from the underbelly of a late 1990s rave: leather or denim underpants worn over black stockings, fuzzy long mohair sweaters or slasher leather trousers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Chanel

If anyone has cornered the market on textured wools and tweeds it's Karl Lagerfeld, who has spent nearly three decades reinventing the signature Chanel suit. His Fall collection, firmly rooted in the Maison's two-piece skirt suit, could not have come at a better time. Lagerfeld cut all manner of sets, but the overarching silhouette was of a flippy flirty short skirt that gave extra mileage to leather-locked legs in over-the-knee boots embellished with silver metal chains. Above this, Lagerfeld worked in boxy jackets with cool new round shoulders or slim upper body shapes, like the terrific short-sleeve coat dresses with its zip-front flared skirt. The palette was deep, dark and edgy - all-black tweeds got injected with shots of Lurex metallic threads or splashed in shiny coatings that added an urban feel to plain old black. The balance of refinement with something grittier and more street was so perfectly judged that the only thing that rang totally clear at the end of this show was a message of pure, unfiltered chic.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Chanel

If anyone has cornered the market on textured wools and tweeds it's Karl Lagerfeld, who has spent nearly three decades reinventing the signature Chanel suit. His Fall collection, firmly rooted in the Maison's two-piece skirt suit, could not have come at a better time. Lagerfeld cut all manner of sets, but the overarching silhouette was of a flippy flirty short skirt that gave extra mileage to leather-locked legs in over-the-knee boots embellished with silver metal chains. Above this, Lagerfeld worked in boxy jackets with cool new round shoulders or slim upper body shapes, like the terrific short-sleeve coat dresses with its zip-front flared skirt. The palette was deep, dark and edgy - all-black tweeds got injected with shots of Lurex metallic threads or splashed in shiny coatings that added an urban feel to plain old black. The balance of refinement with something grittier and more street was so perfectly judged that the only thing that rang totally clear at the end of this show was a message of pure, unfiltered chic.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Chanel

If anyone has cornered the market on textured wools and tweeds it's Karl Lagerfeld, who has spent nearly three decades reinventing the signature Chanel suit. His Fall collection, firmly rooted in the Maison's two-piece skirt suit, could not have come at a better time. Lagerfeld cut all manner of sets, but the overarching silhouette was of a flippy flirty short skirt that gave extra mileage to leather-locked legs in over-the-knee boots embellished with silver metal chains. Above this, Lagerfeld worked in boxy jackets with cool new round shoulders or slim upper body shapes, like the terrific short-sleeve coat dresses with its zip-front flared skirt. The palette was deep, dark and edgy - all-black tweeds got injected with shots of Lurex metallic threads or splashed in shiny coatings that added an urban feel to plain old black. The balance of refinement with something grittier and more street was so perfectly judged that the only thing that rang totally clear at the end of this show was a message of pure, unfiltered chic.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Chanel

If anyone has cornered the market on textured wools and tweeds it's Karl Lagerfeld, who has spent nearly three decades reinventing the signature Chanel suit. His Fall collection, firmly rooted in the Maison's two-piece skirt suit, could not have come at a better time. Lagerfeld cut all manner of sets, but the overarching silhouette was of a flippy flirty short skirt that gave extra mileage to leather-locked legs in over-the-knee boots embellished with silver metal chains. Above this, Lagerfeld worked in boxy jackets with cool new round shoulders or slim upper body shapes, like the terrific short-sleeve coat dresses with its zip-front flared skirt. The palette was deep, dark and edgy - all-black tweeds got injected with shots of Lurex metallic threads or splashed in shiny coatings that added an urban feel to plain old black. The balance of refinement with something grittier and more street was so perfectly judged that the only thing that rang totally clear at the end of this show was a message of pure, unfiltered chic.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Chanel

If anyone has cornered the market on textured wools and tweeds it's Karl Lagerfeld, who has spent nearly three decades reinventing the signature Chanel suit. His Fall collection, firmly rooted in the Maison's two-piece skirt suit, could not have come at a better time. Lagerfeld cut all manner of sets, but the overarching silhouette was of a flippy flirty short skirt that gave extra mileage to leather-locked legs in over-the-knee boots embellished with silver metal chains. Above this, Lagerfeld worked in boxy jackets with cool new round shoulders or slim upper body shapes, like the terrific short-sleeve coat dresses with its zip-front flared skirt. The palette was deep, dark and edgy - all-black tweeds got injected with shots of Lurex metallic threads or splashed in shiny coatings that added an urban feel to plain old black. The balance of refinement with something grittier and more street was so perfectly judged that the only thing that rang totally clear at the end of this show was a message of pure, unfiltered chic.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Valentino

No other fashion brand in the world manages to create such deep sobriety and wrap it up in such a covetable and universally beautiful way as Valentino. Since taking over as creative directors, Pierpaolo Piccioli and Maria Grazia Chiuri have stuck to the single-minded focus of covered up, modern elegance. And luckily for us, they manage to spin out fresh takes on this vision every season. For Fall, there was a renaissance-era papal influence in the weighty silhouettes that sloped dramatically like volcanoes from the neck to the knee or feet, as seen in the single pleat-front satin gowns or alpaca coats. Long-sleeved, primly cut dresses are by now a house signature, making this one of the few serious fashion brands that can be worn well by a woman over 50. This season, they were chopped above the knee with perky bubble or flared A-line skirts decorated in rich floral carpet texture prints, or fashioned out of stiffened black wool with stencil-cut white leather collars. Although the encrusted white beaded embroidery gowns were knockouts, we would have loved to have seen more of the exquisite blue and white embroideries inspired by Delft ceramics.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Valentino

No other fashion brand in the world manages to create such deep sobriety and wrap it up in such a covetable and universally beautiful way as Valentino. Since taking over as creative directors, Pierpaolo Piccioli and Maria Grazia Chiuri have stuck to the single-minded focus of covered up, modern elegance. And luckily for us, they manage to spin out fresh takes on this vision every season. For Fall, there was a renaissance-era papal influence in the weighty silhouettes that sloped dramatically like volcanoes from the neck to the knee or feet, as seen in the single pleat-front satin gowns or alpaca coats. Long-sleeved, primly cut dresses are by now a house signature, making this one of the few serious fashion brands that can be worn well by a woman over 50. This season, they were chopped above the knee with perky bubble or flared A-line skirts decorated in rich floral carpet texture prints, or fashioned out of stiffened black wool with stencil-cut white leather collars. Although the encrusted white beaded embroidery gowns were knockouts, we would have loved to have seen more of the exquisite blue and white embroideries inspired by Delft ceramics.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Valentino

No other fashion brand in the world manages to create such deep sobriety and wrap it up in such a covetable and universally beautiful way as Valentino. Since taking over as creative directors, Pierpaolo Piccioli and Maria Grazia Chiuri have stuck to the single-minded focus of covered up, modern elegance. And luckily for us, they manage to spin out fresh takes on this vision every season. For Fall, there was a renaissance-era papal influence in the weighty silhouettes that sloped dramatically like volcanoes from the neck to the knee or feet, as seen in the single pleat-front satin gowns or alpaca coats. Long-sleeved, primly cut dresses are by now a house signature, making this one of the few serious fashion brands that can be worn well by a woman over 50. This season, they were chopped above the knee with perky bubble or flared A-line skirts decorated in rich floral carpet texture prints, or fashioned out of stiffened black wool with stencil-cut white leather collars. Although the encrusted white beaded embroidery gowns were knockouts, we would have loved to have seen more of the exquisite blue and white embroideries inspired by Delft ceramics.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Valentino

No other fashion brand in the world manages to create such deep sobriety and wrap it up in such a covetable and universally beautiful way as Valentino. Since taking over as creative directors, Pierpaolo Piccioli and Maria Grazia Chiuri have stuck to the single-minded focus of covered up, modern elegance. And luckily for us, they manage to spin out fresh takes on this vision every season. For Fall, there was a renaissance-era papal influence in the weighty silhouettes that sloped dramatically like volcanoes from the neck to the knee or feet, as seen in the single pleat-front satin gowns or alpaca coats. Long-sleeved, primly cut dresses are by now a house signature, making this one of the few serious fashion brands that can be worn well by a woman over 50. This season, they were chopped above the knee with perky bubble or flared A-line skirts decorated in rich floral carpet texture prints, or fashioned out of stiffened black wool with stencil-cut white leather collars. Although the encrusted white beaded embroidery gowns were knockouts, we would have loved to have seen more of the exquisite blue and white embroideries inspired by Delft ceramics.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Valentino

No other fashion brand in the world manages to create such deep sobriety and wrap it up in such a covetable and universally beautiful way as Valentino. Since taking over as creative directors, Pierpaolo Piccioli and Maria Grazia Chiuri have stuck to the single-minded focus of covered up, modern elegance. And luckily for us, they manage to spin out fresh takes on this vision every season. For Fall, there was a renaissance-era papal influence in the weighty silhouettes that sloped dramatically like volcanoes from the neck to the knee or feet, as seen in the single pleat-front satin gowns or alpaca coats. Long-sleeved, primly cut dresses are by now a house signature, making this one of the few serious fashion brands that can be worn well by a woman over 50. This season, they were chopped above the knee with perky bubble or flared A-line skirts decorated in rich floral carpet texture prints, or fashioned out of stiffened black wool with stencil-cut white leather collars. Although the stiffly-crusted white beaded embroidery gowns were knockouts, we would have loved to have seen more of the exquisite blue and white embroideries inspired by Delft ceramics.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Alexander McQueen

Ecclesiastical pomp, England's Virgin Queen and religious holy communion were all themes richly expressed by Sarah Burton and the McQueen studio in ten dresses, presented almost as a series of five dresses in two very close variants, inside a gilded salon at the Opéra Comique in central Paris. Pearls were everywhere, stitched in traditional diagonal quilt pattern onto everything from large netted stockings to sleeves and high neck ruffles. The highly conceptual runway offering served to be a sort of thick cream topping a commercial collection that will eventually land on the shop floor next season, where contemporary, modern and sellable items from heels to T-Shirts and evening gowns have been suffused with inspiration and style notes from the wardrobe of Queen Elizabeth I.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Alexander McQueen

Ecclesiastical pomp, England's Virgin Queen and religious holy communion were all themes richly expressed by Sarah Burton and the McQueen studio in ten dresses, presented almost as a series of five dresses in two very close variants, inside a gilded salon at the Opéra Comique in central Paris. Pearls were everywhere, stitched in traditional diagonal quilt pattern onto everything from large netted stockings to sleeves and high neck ruffles. The highly conceptual runway offering served to be a sort of thick cream topping a commercial collection that will eventually land on the shop floor next season, where contemporary, modern and sellable items from heels to T-Shirts and evening gowns have been suffused with inspiration and style notes from the wardrobe of Queen Elizabeth I.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Alexander McQueen

Ecclesiastical pomp, England's Virgin Queen and religious holy communion were all themes richly expressed by Sarah Burton and the McQueen studio in ten dresses, presented almost as a series of five dresses in two very close variants, inside a gilded salon at the Opéra Comique in central Paris. Pearls were everywhere, stitched in traditional diagonal quilt pattern onto everything from large netted stockings to sleeves and high neck ruffles. The highly conceptual runway offering served to be a sort of thick cream topping a commercial collection that will eventually land on the shop floor next season, where contemporary, modern and sellable items from heels to T-Shirts and evening gowns have been suffused with inspiration and style notes from the wardrobe of Queen Elizabeth I.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Alexander McQueen

Ecclesiastical pomp, England's Virgin Queen and religious holy communion were all themes richly expressed by Sarah Burton and the McQueen studio in ten dresses, presented almost as a series of five dresses in two very close variants, inside a gilded salon at the Opéra Comique in central Paris. Pearls were everywhere, stitched in traditional diagonal quilt pattern onto everything from large netted stockings to sleeves and high neck ruffles. The highly conceptual runway offering served to be a sort of thick cream topping a commercial collection that will eventually land on the shop floor next season, where contemporary, modern and sellable items from heels to T-Shirts and evening gowns have been suffused with inspiration and style notes from the wardrobe of Queen Elizabeth I.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Alexander McQueen

Ecclesiastical pomp, England's Virgin Queen and religious holy communion were all themes richly expressed by Sarah Burton and the McQueen studio in ten dresses, presented almost as a series of five dresses in two very close variants, inside a gilded salon at the Opéra Comique in central Paris. Pearls were everywhere, stitched in traditional diagonal quilt pattern onto everything from large netted stockings to sleeves and high neck ruffles. The highly conceptual runway offering served to be a sort of thick cream topping a commercial collection that will eventually land on the shop floor next season, where contemporary, modern and sellable items from heels to T-Shirts and evening gowns have been suffused with inspiration and style notes from the wardrobe of Queen Elizabeth I.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Hermès

A strong show by Christophe Lemaire elevated Hermès to the sporty luxurious place in which it rightly deserves to rule. Lemaire's idea here, his first since starting as creative director, was firmly rooted in pared-down, ultra-luxe 'separates' dressing: nearly every piece in this show could stand as easily and logically on its own. With simple silhouettes on show, the eye was drawn instantly to the impeccably crafted fabrics - everything from ultra-long paper-thin calfskin wrap skirts to clean suede trench coats layered over pristine white goatskin coats. Even the wool felt got elevated to unearthly levels of high quality in a double-faced jacket whose single-seam construction gave it the insouciant ease of a felt hat. This season Hermès pointed at 'stealth' chic - everything from low-heeled boots and hooded wool cloaks to loosened leather trousers - a move that is destined to make its ready-to-wear as covetable as the under-the-radar yet jewel-like accessories.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Hermès

A strong show by Christophe Lemaire elevated Hermès to the sporty luxurious place in which it rightly deserves to rule. Lemaire's idea here, his first since starting as creative director, was firmly rooted in pared-down, ultra-luxe 'separates' dressing: nearly every piece in this show could stand as easily and logically on its own. With simple silhouettes on show, the eye was drawn instantly to the impeccably crafted fabrics - everything from ultra long paper thin calfskin wrap skirts to clean suede trench coats layered over pristine white goatskin coats. Even the wool felt got elevated to unearthly levels of high quality in a double-faced jacket whose single-seam construction gave it the insouciant ease of a felt hat. This season Hermès pointed at 'stealth' chic - everything from low-heeled boots and hooded wool cloaks to loosened leather trousers - a move that is destined to make its ready-to-wear as covetable as the under-the-radar yet jewel-like accessories.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

 

Hermès

A strong show by Christophe Lemaire elevated Hermès to the sporty luxurious place in which it rightly deserves to rule. Lemaire's idea here, his first since starting as creative director, was firmly rooted in pared-down, ultra-luxe 'separates' dressing: nearly every piece in this show could stand as easily and logically on its own. With simple silhouettes on show, the eye was drawn instantly to the impeccably crafted fabrics - everything from ultra long paper thin calfskin wrap skirts to clean suede trench coats layered over pristine white goatskin coats. Even the wool felt got elevated to unearthly levels of high quality in a double-faced jacket whose single-seam construction gave it the insouciant ease of a felt hat. This season Hermès pointed at 'stealth' chic - everything from low-heeled boots and hooded wool cloaks to loosened leather trousers - a move that is destined to make its ready-to-wear as covetable as the under-the-radar yet jewel-like accessories.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Hermès

A strong show by Christophe Lemaire elevated Hermès to the sporty luxurious place in which it rightly deserves to rule. Lemaire's idea here, his first since starting as creative director, was firmly rooted in pared-down, ultra-luxe 'separates' dressing: nearly every piece in this show could stand as easily and logically on its own. With simple silhouettes on show, the eye was drawn instantly to the impeccably crafted fabrics - everything from ultra long paper thin calfskin wrap skirts to clean suede trench coats layered over pristine white goatskin coats. Even the wool felt got elevated to unearthly levels of high quality in a double-faced jacket whose single-seam construction gave it the insouciant ease of a felt hat. This season Hermès pointed at 'stealth' chic - everything from low-heeled boots and hooded wool cloaks to loosened leather trousers - a move that is destined to make its ready-to-wear as covetable as the under-the-radar yet jewel-like accessories.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

 

Hermès

A strong show by Christophe Lemaire elevated Hermès to the sporty luxurious place in which it rightly deserves to rule. Lemaire's idea here, his first since starting as creative director, was firmly rooted in pared-down, ultra-luxe 'separates' dressing: nearly every piece in this show could stand as easily and logically on its own. With simple silhouettes on show, the eye was drawn instantly to the impeccably crafted fabrics - everything from ultra long paper thin calfskin wrap skirts to clean suede trench coats layered over pristine white goatskin coats. Even the wool felt got elevated to unearthly levels of high quality in a double-faced jacket whose single-seam construction gave it the insouciant ease of a felt hat. This season Hermès pointed at 'stealth' chic - everything from low-heeled boots and hooded wool cloaks to loosened leather trousers - a move that is destined to make its ready-to-wear as covetable as the under-the-radar yet jewel-like accessories.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Louis Vuitton

The row of closed doors lined up against a wallpapered wall at the Louis Vuitton show were meant to resemble portals into hotel rooms, but with all of the coming and going, we couldn't help thinking of a brothel - make that a very upscale establishment, with ladies of only the highest class on offer of course. Wearing lingerie-inspired wool dresses trimmed in sexy lace, or sweeping printed silk coats that resembled dressing gowns, the women exited their individual rooms as if they had just done the deed with glamorous, confident disregard. They threw on mannish-looking overcoats - probably pilfered from their bedroom partners - over the comely dresses and long ladylike skirts, accessorised with big fluffy mink bags. The entire exercise was perfectly calibrated to the realm of sophisticated luxury. And that feeling was underscored by a finale in which sparkling paillettes, ostrich feathers and mink trims were showered beautifully on menswear tweeds and wools. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Louis Vuitton

The row of closed doors lined up against a wallpapered wall at the Louis Vuitton show were meant to resemble portals into hotel rooms, but with all of the coming and going, we couldn't help thinking of a brothel - make that a very upscale establishment, with ladies of only the highest class on offer of course. Wearing lingerie-inspired wool dresses trimmed in sexy lace, or sweeping printed silk coats that resembled dressing gowns, the women exited their individual rooms as if they had just done the deed with glamorous, confident disregard. They threw on mannish-looking overcoats - probably pilfered from their bedroom partners - over the comely dresses and long ladylike skirts, accessorised with big fluffy mink bags. The entire exercise was perfectly calibrated to the realm of sophisticated luxury. And that feeling was underscored by a finale in which sparkling paillettes, ostrich feathers and mink trims were showered beautifully on menswear tweeds and wools. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Louis Vuitton

The row of closed doors lined up against a wallpapered wall at the Louis Vuitton show were meant to resemble portals into hotel rooms, but with all of the coming and going, we couldn't help thinking of a brothel - make that a very upscale establishment, with ladies of only the highest class on offer of course. Wearing lingerie-inspired wool dresses trimmed in sexy lace, or sweeping printed silk coats that resembled dressing gowns, the women exited their individual rooms as if they had just done the deed with glamorous, confident disregard. They threw on mannish-looking overcoats - probably pilfered from their bedroom partners - over the comely dresses and long ladylike skirts, accessorised with big fluffy mink bags. The entire exercise was perfectly calibrated to the realm of sophisticated luxury. And that feeling was underscored by a finale in which sparkling paillettes, ostrich feathers and mink trims were showered beautifully on menswear tweeds and wools. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Louis Vuitton

The row of closed doors lined up against a wallpapered wall at the Louis Vuitton show were meant to resemble portals into hotel rooms, but with all of the coming and going, we couldn't help thinking of a brothel - make that a very upscale establishment, with ladies of only the highest class on offer of course. Wearing lingerie-inspired wool dresses trimmed in sexy lace, or sweeping printed silk coats that resembled dressing gowns, the women exited their individual rooms as if they had just done the deed with glamorous, confident disregard. They threw on mannish-looking overcoats - probably pilfered from their bedroom partners - over the comely dresses and long ladylike skirts, accessorised with big fluffy mink bags. The entire exercise was perfectly calibrated to the realm of sophisticated luxury. And that feeling was underscored by a finale in which sparkling paillettes, ostrich feathers and mink trims were showered beautifully on menswear tweeds and wools. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Louis Vuitton

The row of closed doors lined up against a wallpapered wall at the Louis Vuitton show were meant to resemble portals into hotel rooms, but with all of the coming and going, we couldn't help thinking of a brothel - make that a very upscale establishment, with ladies of only the highest class on offer of course. Wearing lingerie-inspired wool dresses trimmed in sexy lace, or sweeping printed silk coats that resembled dressing gowns, the women exited their individual rooms as if they had just done the deed with glamorous, confident disregard. They threw on mannish-looking overcoats - probably pilfered from their bedroom partners - over the comely dresses and long ladylike skirts, accessorised with big fluffy mink bags. The entire exercise was perfectly calibrated to the realm of sophisticated luxury. And that feeling was underscored by a finale in which sparkling paillettes, ostrich feathers and mink trims were showered beautifully on menswear tweeds and wools. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Rouge

On top of its usual remit of puffer jackets this season, Moncler had many tricks up its sleeve. First there were the real huskies, tethered to fox-covered men who opened the show, pacing around on the fake snow-flaked floor, trying to make sense of the fashion crowd that goggled at them. Then there were the ice climbers, who slid down rock-climbing ropes and made live James Bond-like landings on the runway. And finally there were polar bears - or rather men dressed as bears - who hugged the white- and crystal-coated girls for the finale. All of this was mere window dressing, however, for the real stars of the show: the finely tuned outerwear. In the first group, mountains of mink, fox, antelope and deer skins were piled up on enormous North Pole outerwear, shrinking the models' heads to mere pin dots under a cocoon of fur.  Next were the expedition-like technical pieces, inspired by ice climbing or snow walking through a blizzard. Though they were made from intricate intarsias of precious materials with nylon, they looked good enough for the slopes. And this of course begs the question of why Moncler hasn't yet tackled proper, technically-certified ski clothing. Sure, those spangled cream coats made for a fabulous finish, but we'd love to see this brand actually roll around in some real snow.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Rouge

On top of its usual remit of puffer jackets this season, Moncler had many tricks up its sleeve. First there were the real huskies, tethered to fox-covered men who opened the show, pacing around on the fake snow-flaked floor, trying to make sense of the fashion crowd that goggled at them. Then there were the ice climbers, who slid down rock-climbing ropes and made live James Bond-like landings on the runway. And finally there were polar bears - or rather men dressed as bears - who hugged the white- and crystal-coated girls for the finale. All of this was mere window dressing, however, for the real stars of the show: the finely tuned outerwear. In the first group, mountains of mink, fox, antelope and deer skins were piled up on enormous North Pole outerwear, shrinking the models' heads to mere pin dots under a cocoon of fur.  Next were the expedition-like technical pieces, inspired by ice climbing or snow walking through a blizzard. Though they were made from intricate intarsias of precious materials with nylon, they looked good enough for the slopes. And this of course begs the question of why Moncler hasn't yet tackled proper, technically-certified ski clothing. Sure, those spangled cream coats made for a fabulous finish, but we'd love to see this brand actually roll around in some real snow.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Rouge

On top of its usual remit of puffer jackets this season, Moncler had many tricks up its sleeve. First there were the real huskies, tethered to fox-covered men who opened the show, pacing around on the fake snow-flaked floor, trying to make sense of the fashion crowd that goggled at them. Then there were the ice climbers, who slid down rock-climbing ropes and made live James Bond-like landings on the runway. And finally there were polar bears - or rather men dressed as bears - who hugged the white- and crystal-coated girls for the finale. All of this was mere window dressing, however, for the real stars of the show: the finely tuned outerwear. In the first group, mountains of mink, fox, antelope and deer skins were piled up on enormous North Pole outerwear, shrinking the models' heads to mere pin dots under a cocoon of fur.  Next were the expedition-like technical pieces, inspired by ice climbing or snow walking through a blizzard. Though they were made from intricate intarsias of precious materials with nylon, they looked good enough for the slopes. And this of course begs the question of why Moncler hasn't yet tackled proper, technically-certified ski clothing. Sure, those spangled cream coats made for a fabulous finish, but we'd love to see this brand actually roll around in some real snow.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Rouge

On top of its usual remit of puffer jackets this season, Moncler had many tricks up its sleeve. First there were the real huskies, tethered to fox-covered men who opened the show, pacing around on the fake snow-flaked floor, trying to make sense of the fashion crowd that goggled at them. Then there were the ice climbers, who slid down rock-climbing ropes and made live James Bond-like landings on the runway. And finally there were polar bears - or rather men dressed as bears - who hugged the white- and crystal-coated girls for the finale. All of this was mere window dressing, however, for the real stars of the show: the finely tuned outerwear. In the first group, mountains of mink, fox, antelope and deer skins were piled up on enormous North Pole outerwear, shrinking the models' heads to mere pin dots under a cocoon of fur.  Next were the expedition-like technical pieces, inspired by ice climbing or snow walking through a blizzard. Though they were made from intricate intarsias of precious materials with nylon, they looked good enough for the slopes. And this of course begs the question of why Moncler hasn't yet tackled proper, technically-certified ski clothing. Sure, those spangled cream coats made for a fabulous finish, but we'd love to see this brand actually roll around in some real snow.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Rouge

On top of its usual remit of puffer jackets this season, Moncler had many tricks up its sleeve. First there were the real huskies, tethered to fox-covered men who opened the show, pacing around on the fake snow-flaked floor, trying to make sense of the fashion crowd that goggled at them. Then there were the ice climbers, who slid down rock-climbing ropes and made live James Bond-like landings on the runway. And finally there were polar bears - or rather men dressed as bears - who hugged the white- and crystal-coated girls for the finale. All of this was mere window dressing, however, for the real stars of the show: the finely tuned outerwear. In the first group, mountains of mink, fox, antelope and deer skins were piled up on enormous North Pole outerwear, shrinking the models' heads to mere pin dots under a cocoon of fur.  Next were the expedition-like technical pieces, inspired by ice climbing or snow walking through a blizzard. Though they were made from intricate intarsias of precious materials with nylon, they looked good enough for the slopes. And this of course begs the question of why Moncler hasn't yet tackled proper, technically-certified ski clothing. Sure, those spangled cream coats made for a fabulous finish, but we'd love to see this brand actually roll around in some real snow.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Miu Miu

We women officially have a new silhouette for next season: long, lean skirts cut just below mid calf, that will require the lift of an extremely high heel to avoid a possible landing in 'dull' territory. There are many ways to slice this idea, but Miuccia Prada served it best at her Miu Miu show where she played with all manner of long dress, accessorised with striped stockings and exaggerated Art Nouveau heels. Strictly speaking, Prada didn't just employ skirts. She used long tubular knit dresses, wool column-cut coats and extra-long knit jumpers to create a layering effect that corseted the already long lean skirt-based garment worn beneath. This allowed the designer to play with the flounced edges of the longer garment that peaked out from under its brace, all the while maintaining a lean string bean silhouette.  Even the outerwear got the stretch treatment. A brilliant navy nylon puffer jacket with balloon sleeves and a cinched waist looked almost like a couture coat, while flared coat dresses in nylon, taffeta or mink could do double duty as both outerwear and elegant indoor outfits. To complete the look, we'll also take a side dish of the braided low buns that rode at the base of the models' necks.

Writer: J.J. Martin

Miu Miu

We women officially have a new silhouette for next season: long, lean skirts cut just below mid calf, that will require the lift of an extremely high heel to avoid a possible landing in 'dull' territory. There are many ways to slice this idea, but Miuccia Prada served it best at her Miu Miu show where she played with all manner of long dress, accessorised with striped stockings and exaggerated Art Nouveau heels. Strictly speaking, Prada didn't just employ skirts. She used long tubular knit dresses, wool column-cut coats and extra-long knit jumpers to create a layering effect that corseted the already long lean skirt-based garment worn beneath. This allowed the designer to play with the flounced edges of the longer garment that peaked out from under its brace, all the while maintaining a lean string bean silhouette.  Even the outerwear got the stretch treatment. A brilliant navy nylon puffer jacket with balloon sleeves and a cinched waist looked almost like a couture coat, while flared coat dresses in nylon, taffeta or mink could do double duty as both outerwear and elegant indoor outfits. To complete the look, we'll also take a side dish of the braided low buns that rode at the base of the models' necks.

Writer: J.J. Martin

Miu Miu

We women officially have a new silhouette for next season: long, lean skirts cut just below mid calf, that will require the lift of an extremely high heel to avoid a possible landing in 'dull' territory. There are many ways to slice this idea, but Miuccia Prada served it best at her Miu Miu show where she played with all manner of long dress, accessorised with striped stockings and exaggerated Art Nouveau heels. Strictly speaking, Prada didn't just employ skirts. She used long tubular knit dresses, wool column-cut coats and extra-long knit jumpers to create a layering effect that corseted the already long lean skirt-based garment worn beneath. This allowed the designer to play with the flounced edges of the longer garment that peaked out from under its brace, all the while maintaining a lean string bean silhouette.  Even the outerwear got the stretch treatment. A brilliant navy nylon puffer jacket with balloon sleeves and a cinched waist looked almost like a couture coat, while flared coat dresses in nylon, taffeta or mink could do double duty as both outerwear and elegant indoor outfits. To complete the look, we'll also take a side dish of the braided low buns that rode at the base of the models' necks.

Writer: J.J. Martin

Miu Miu 

We women officially have a new silhouette for next season: long, lean skirts cut just below mid calf, that will require the lift of an extremely high heel to avoid a possible landing in 'dull' territory. There are many ways to slice this idea, but Miuccia Prada served it best at her Miu Miu show where she played with all manner of long dress, accessorised with striped stockings and exaggerated Art Nouveau heels. Strictly speaking, Prada didn't just employ skirts. She used long tubular knit dresses, wool column-cut coats and extra-long knit jumpers to create a layering effect that corseted the already long lean skirt-based garment worn beneath. This allowed the designer to play with the flounced edges of the longer garment that peaked out from under its brace, all the while maintaining a lean string bean silhouette.  Even the outerwear got the stretch treatment. A brilliant navy nylon puffer jacket with balloon sleeves and a cinched waist looked almost like a couture coat, while flared coat dresses in nylon, taffeta or mink could do double duty as both outerwear and elegant indoor outfits. To complete the look, we'll also take a side dish of the braided low buns that rode at the base of the models' necks.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Miu Miu 

We women officially have a new silhouette for next season: long, lean skirts cut just below mid calf, that will require the lift of an extremely high heel to avoid a possible landing in 'dull' territory. There are many ways to slice this idea, but Miuccia Prada served it best at her Miu Miu show where she played with all manner of long dress, accessorised with striped stockings and exaggerated Art Nouveau heels. Strictly speaking, Prada didn't just employ skirts. She used long tubular knit dresses, wool column-cut coats and extra-long knit jumpers to create a layering effect that corseted the already long lean skirt-based garment worn beneath. This allowed the designer to play with the flounced edges of the longer garment that peaked out from under its brace, all the while maintaining a lean string bean silhouette.  Even the outerwear got the stretch treatment. A brilliant navy nylon puffer jacket with balloon sleeves and a cinched waist looked almost like a couture coat, while flared coat dresses in nylon, taffeta or mink could do double duty as both outerwear and elegant indoor outfits. To complete the look, we'll also take a side dish of the braided low buns that rode at the base of the models' necks.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

 

Dries Van Noten

‘Heaven, I’m in heaven…’ – Fred Astaire’s dulcet tones weren’t the only dreamy thing to resonate at Dries Van Noten’s show. Opening his show with ‘Cheek to Cheek’ (Astaire’s song for Ginger Rogers in the 1935 movie Top Hat), Van Noten pretty much prophesised what we would be feeling when we exited the beautiful cloistered halls of Paris’ City Hall – just heavenly. The idea of ‘fused genders’ was very much at the heart of the Belgian designer’s Fall serenade. Taking cues from both Fred and Ginger, the collection saw the likes of a men’s tailored shirt being tucked nonchalantly into a womanly wispy below-the-knee feathered skirt - a pair of grey trousers peeking just below the skirt’s hem. The structured, strong manliness of some of the looks, which in the first half were punctuated with preppy club-striped blazers and scarves, gradually glided into a softer gear: faded wallpaper motifs, chinoiserie, shimmering brocade and luxuriously textured ostrich feathers, which appeared as maribou trim on floaty tops and even punctuated with glittery stones on a particularly striking raspberry pink chiffon dress.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael


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