Edun

Edun, the ethical fashion label co-founded by US singer Bono and wife Ali Hewson, has come a long way since its inception in 2005. Under the stewardship of creative director Sharon Wauchob, the utopian label has surpassed its purpose of building trade relationships with Africa by turning out increasingly cohesive collections for him and her, year after year. For Fall, Wauchob gave a nod to the label’s rock and roll roots with silk tartan, liquid lamé and studded leather aplenty. Still, this was no time warp; pieces for both sexes, like black blouses with delicate chain detailing and skinny knitted sweaters, boasted seductive, languid silhouettes and lots of skin, thanks to necklines plunging down almost to the navel.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Edun

Edun, the ethical fashion label co-founded by US singer Bono and wife Ali Hewson, has come a long way since its inception in 2005. Under the stewardship of creative director Sharon Wauchob, the utopian label has surpassed its purpose of building trade relationships with Africa by turning out increasingly cohesive collections for him and her, year after year. For Fall, Wauchob gave a nod to the label’s rock and roll roots with silk tartan, liquid lamé and studded leather aplenty. Still, this was no time warp; pieces for both sexes, like black blouses with delicate chain detailing and skinny knitted sweaters, boasted seductive, languid silhouettes and lots of skin, thanks to necklines plunging down almost to the navel.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Edun

Edun, the ethical fashion label co-founded by US singer Bono and wife Ali Hewson, has come a long way since its inception in 2005. Under the stewardship of creative director Sharon Wauchob, the utopian label has surpassed its purpose of building trade relationships with Africa by turning out increasingly cohesive collections for him and her, year after year. For Fall, Wauchob gave a nod to the label’s rock and roll roots with silk tartan, liquid lamé and studded leather aplenty. Still, this was no time warp; pieces for both sexes, like black blouses with delicate chain detailing and skinny knitted sweaters, boasted seductive, languid silhouettes and lots of skin, thanks to necklines plunging down almost to the navel.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Edun

Edun, the ethical fashion label co-founded by US singer Bono and wife Ali Hewson, has come a long way since its inception in 2005. Under the stewardship of creative director Sharon Wauchob, the utopian label has surpassed its purpose of building trade relationships with Africa by turning out increasingly cohesive collections for him and her, year after year. For Fall, Wauchob gave a nod to the label’s rock and roll roots with silk tartan, liquid lamé and studded leather aplenty. Still, this was no time warp; pieces for both sexes, like black blouses with delicate chain detailing and skinny knitted sweaters, boasted seductive, languid silhouettes and lots of skin, thanks to necklines plunging down almost to the navel.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Edun

Edun, the ethical fashion label co-founded by US singer Bono and wife Ali Hewson, has come a long way since its inception in 2005. Under the stewardship of creative director Sharon Wauchob, the utopian label has surpassed its purpose of building trade relationships with Africa by turning out increasingly cohesive collections for him and her, year after year. For Fall, Wauchob gave a nod to the label’s rock and roll roots with silk tartan, liquid lamé and studded leather aplenty. Still, this was no time warp; pieces for both sexes, like black blouses with delicate chain detailing and skinny knitted sweaters, boasted seductive, languid silhouettes and lots of skin, thanks to necklines plunging down almost to the navel.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Rag & Bone

Founded in New York by Brits Marcus Wainwright and David Neville, Rag & Bone truly made the most of its dual citizenship this season. The label presented an impressive collection that was equal parts American athleticism and British heritage. Outerwear was a clear focus, and parkas, peacoats and bomber jackets galore were constructed from fabrics ranging from quilted satin to brushed wool and various tweeds. Houndstooth pieces were made from a rubberised tweed for an added, reflective oomph. There was plenty of elegance to go round too, thanks to elongated tailored blazers in a broken Prince of Wales check and one razor-sharp wool suit. Throw in details like roll-neck jumpers, acid-toned loafers, messy side-swept hair and a thin stripe of black eyeliner above the eye, and that’s what we’d call a runway success.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Rag & Bone

Founded in New York by Brits Marcus Wainwright and David Neville, Rag & Bone truly made the most of its dual citizenship this season. The label presented an impressive collection that was equal parts American athleticism and British heritage. Outerwear was a clear focus, and parkas, peacoats and bomber jackets galore were constructed from fabrics ranging from quilted satin to brushed wool and various tweeds. Houndstooth pieces were made from a rubberised tweed for an added, reflective oomph. There was plenty of elegance to go round too, thanks to elongated tailored blazers in a broken Prince of Wales check and one razor-sharp wool suit. Throw in details like roll-neck jumpers, acid-toned loafers, messy side-swept hair and a thin stripe of black eyeliner above the eye, and that’s what we’d call a runway success.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Rag & Bone

Founded in New York by Brits Marcus Wainwright and David Neville, Rag & Bone truly made the most of its dual citizenship this season. The label presented an impressive collection that was equal parts American athleticism and British heritage. Outerwear was a clear focus, and parkas, peacoats and bomber jackets galore were constructed from fabrics ranging from quilted satin to brushed wool and various tweeds. Houndstooth pieces were made from a rubberised tweed for an added, reflective oomph. There was plenty of elegance to go round too, thanks to elongated tailored blazers in a broken Prince of Wales check and one razor-sharp wool suit. Throw in details like roll-neck jumpers, acid-toned loafers, messy side-swept hair and a thin stripe of black eyeliner above the eye, and that’s what we’d call a runway success.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Rag & Bone

Founded in New York by Brits Marcus Wainwright and David Neville, Rag & Bone truly made the most of its dual citizenship this season. The label presented an impressive collection that was equal parts American athleticism and British heritage. Outerwear was a clear focus, and parkas, peacoats and bomber jackets galore were constructed from fabrics ranging from quilted satin to brushed wool and various tweeds. Houndstooth pieces were made from a rubberised tweed for an added, reflective oomph. There was plenty of elegance to go round too, thanks to elongated tailored blazers in a broken Prince of Wales check and one razor-sharp wool suit. Throw in details like roll-neck jumpers, acid-toned loafers, messy side-swept hair and a thin stripe of black eyeliner above the eye, and that’s what we’d call a runway success.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Rag & Bone

Founded in New York by Brits Marcus Wainwright and David Neville, Rag & Bone truly made the most of its dual citizenship this season. The label presented an impressive collection that was equal parts American athleticism and British heritage. Outerwear was a clear focus, and parkas, peacoats and bomber jackets galore were constructed from fabrics ranging from quilted satin to brushed wool and various tweeds. Houndstooth pieces were made from a rubberised tweed for an added, reflective oomph. There was plenty of elegance to go round too, thanks to elongated tailored blazers in a broken Prince of Wales check and one razor-sharp wool suit. Throw in details like roll-neck jumpers, acid-toned loafers, messy side-swept hair and a thin stripe of black eyeliner above the eye, and that’s what we’d call a runway success.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Lacoste

To celebrate Lacoste's big 80th this year, creative director Felipe Oliveira Baptista paid homage to the brand’s backbone – its patented cotton piqué. Mixed in with double-faced wool, knits and mohair, the pique took on a sophisticated quality. Voluminous cotton sweater dresses were screen-printed with images of desolate arctic landscapes and icebergs, while architectural blouses were cleverly paired with typical polo shirt collars. Bold bursts of orange, green and blue appeared on collars and jacket lapels, imbuing the mostly white and grey collection with a 1970s après-ski vibe. Our highlight: the broad-shouldered sweatshirts and jogging suits that remain true to the label’s athletic heritage despite heading distinctly into the future.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Lacoste

To celebrate Lacoste's big 80th this year, creative director Felipe Oliveira Baptista paid homage to the brand’s backbone – its patented cotton piqué. Mixed in with double-faced wool, knits and mohair, the pique took on a sophisticated quality. Voluminous cotton sweater dresses were screen-printed with images of desolate arctic landscapes and icebergs, while architectural blouses were cleverly paired with typical polo shirt collars. Bold bursts of orange, green and blue appeared on collars and jacket lapels, imbuing the mostly white and grey collection with a 1970s après-ski vibe. Our highlight: the broad-shouldered sweatshirts and jogging suits that remain true to the label’s athletic heritage despite heading distinctly into the future.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Lacoste

To celebrate Lacoste's big 80th this year, creative director Felipe Oliveira Baptista paid homage to the brand’s backbone – its patented cotton piqué. Mixed in with double-faced wool, knits and mohair, the pique took on a sophisticated quality. Voluminous cotton sweater dresses were screen-printed with images of desolate arctic landscapes and icebergs, while architectural blouses were cleverly paired with typical polo shirt collars. Bold bursts of orange, green and blue appeared on collars and jacket lapels, imbuing the mostly white and grey collection with a 1970s après-ski vibe. Our highlight: the broad-shouldered sweatshirts and jogging suits that remain true to the label’s athletic heritage despite heading distinctly into the future.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Lacoste

To celebrate Lacoste's big 80th this year, creative director Felipe Oliveira Baptista paid homage to the brand’s backbone – its patented cotton piqué. Mixed in with double-faced wool, knits and mohair, the pique took on a sophisticated quality. Voluminous cotton sweater dresses were screen-printed with images of desolate arctic landscapes and icebergs, while architectural blouses were cleverly paired with typical polo shirt collars. Bold bursts of orange, green and blue appeared on collars and jacket lapels, imbuing the mostly white and grey collection with a 1970s après-ski vibe. Our highlight: the broad-shouldered sweatshirts and jogging suits that remain true to the label’s athletic heritage despite heading distinctly into the future.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Lacoste

To celebrate Lacoste's big 80th this year, creative director Felipe Oliveira Baptista paid homage to the brand’s backbone – its patented cotton piqué. Mixed in with double-faced wool, knits and mohair, the pique took on a sophisticated quality. Voluminous cotton sweater dresses were screen-printed with images of desolate arctic landscapes and icebergs, while architectural blouses were cleverly paired with typical polo shirt collars. Bold bursts of orange, green and blue appeared on collars and jacket lapels, imbuing the mostly white and grey collection with a 1970s après-ski vibe. Our highlight: the broad-shouldered sweatshirts and jogging suits that remain true to the label’s athletic heritage despite heading distinctly into the future.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Alexander Wang

While the fashion world waits just a little longer for his big debut for Balenciaga, Alexander Wang proved that he was still the master of downtown cool on his home turf. The basis of the collection was rooted in austere minimalism, and silhouettes were blocky and uncompromising; round-shouldered coats dropped down to the knee, while fuzzy mohair jumpers were paired with crisp, boat necklines and voluminous bell-sleeves to boot. The overall look was Wang's signature brand of androgynous cool, combined with a fresh approach to texture. The young designer fearlessly played with fur - adorning coats and jackets with luscious panels of the stuff - and textured fabrics, with several looks in iridescent duchesse satin woven with a broken tiger stripe. Together with more slinky separates that boasted spliced details, Wang proved he holds a winning formula that is hard to beat.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Alexander Wang

While the fashion world waits just a little longer for his big debut for Balenciaga, Alexander Wang proved that he was still the master of downtown cool on his home turf. The basis of the collection was rooted in austere minimalism, and silhouettes were blocky and uncompromising; round-shouldered coats dropped down to the knee, while fuzzy mohair jumpers were paired with crisp, boat necklines and voluminous bell-sleeves to boot. The overall look was Wang's signature brand of androgynous cool, combined with a fresh approach to texture. The young designer fearlessly played with fur - adorning coats and jackets with luscious panels of the stuff - and textured fabrics, with several looks in iridescent duchesse satin woven with a broken tiger stripe. Together with more slinky separates that boasted spliced details, Wang proved he holds a winning formula that is hard to beat.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

 

Alexander Wang

While the fashion world waits just a little longer for his big debut for Balenciaga, Alexander Wang proved that he was still the master of downtown cool on his home turf. The basis of the collection was rooted in austere minimalism, and silhouettes were blocky and uncompromising; round-shouldered coats dropped down to the knee, while fuzzy mohair jumpers were paired with crisp, boat necklines and voluminous bell-sleeves to boot. The overall look was Wang's signature brand of androgynous cool, combined with a fresh approach to texture. The young designer fearlessly played with fur - adorning coats and jackets with luscious panels of the stuff - and textured fabrics, with several looks in iridescent duchesse satin woven with a broken tiger stripe. Together with more slinky separates that boasted spliced details, Wang proved he holds a winning formula that is hard to beat.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

 

Alexander Wang

While the fashion world waits just a little longer for his big debut for Balenciaga, Alexander Wang proved that he was still the master of downtown cool on his home turf. The basis of the collection was rooted in austere minimalism, and silhouettes were blocky and uncompromising; round-shouldered coats dropped down to the knee, while fuzzy mohair jumpers were paired with crisp, boat necklines and voluminous bell-sleeves to boot. The overall look was Wang's signature brand of androgynous cool, combined with a fresh approach to texture. The young designer fearlessly played with fur - adorning coats and jackets with luscious panels of the stuff - and textured fabrics, with several looks in iridescent duchesse satin woven with a broken tiger stripe. Together with more slinky separates that boasted spliced details, Wang proved he holds a winning formula that is hard to beat.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

 

Alexander Wang

While the fashion world waits just a little longer for his big debut for Balenciaga, Alexander Wang proved that he was still the master of downtown cool on his home turf. The basis of the collection was rooted in austere minimalism, and silhouettes were blocky and uncompromising; round-shouldered coats dropped down to the knee, while fuzzy mohair jumpers were paired with crisp, boat necklines and voluminous bell-sleeves to boot. The overall look was Wang's signature brand of androgynous cool, combined with a fresh approach to texture. The young designer fearlessly played with fur - adorning coats and jackets with luscious panels of the stuff - and textured fabrics, with several looks in iridescent duchesse satin woven with a broken tiger stripe. Together with more slinky separates that boasted spliced details, Wang proved he holds a winning formula that is hard to beat.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

 

Moncler Grenoble

Few fashion houses can put on a presentation like Moncler. In a follow-up effort to last year’s bonanza staged at the Wollman Rink in Central Park, the luxury outerwear label took over New York’s famed Gotham Hall as the setting to present its Grenoble label's Fall collection. Staged in the foyer of the hall, Moncler enlisted an army of models (who have to be credited for standing rod still) arranged stadium-style, above spectators. Dressed in an enviable array of winter separates in a sea of green, this was technical fashion at its best. Quilted puffer jackets were teamed with knitted sleeve gloves and fur stoles. In keeping with the Grenoble label’s ethos of reinterpreting vintage styles for the modern day, the nostalgic glamour of the collection will be as equal a hit on the slopes or on the streets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Moncler Grenoble

Few fashion houses can put on a presentation like Moncler. In a follow-up effort to last year’s bonanza staged at the Wollman Rink in Central Park, the luxury outerwear label took over New York’s famed Gotham Hall as the setting to present its Grenoble label's Fall collection. Staged in the foyer of the hall, Moncler enlisted an army of models (who have to be credited for standing rod still) arranged stadium-style, above spectators. Dressed in an enviable array of winter separates in a sea of green, this was technical fashion at its best. Quilted puffer jackets were teamed with knitted sleeve gloves and fur stoles. In keeping with the Grenoble label’s ethos of reinterpreting vintage styles for the modern day, the nostalgic glamour of the collection will be as equal a hit on the slopes or on the streets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Moncler Grenoble

Few fashion houses can put on a presentation like Moncler. In a follow-up effort to last year’s bonanza staged at the Wollman Rink in Central Park, the luxury outerwear label took over New York’s famed Gotham Hall as the setting to present its Grenoble label's Fall collection. Staged in the foyer of the hall, Moncler enlisted an army of models (who have to be credited for standing rod still) arranged stadium-style, above spectators. Dressed in an enviable array of winter separates in a sea of green, this was technical fashion at its best. Quilted puffer jackets were teamed with knitted sleeve gloves and fur stoles. In keeping with the Grenoble label’s ethos of reinterpreting vintage styles for the modern day, the nostalgic glamour of the collection will be as equal a hit on the slopes or on the streets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Moncler Grenoble

Few fashion houses can put on a presentation like Moncler. In a follow-up effort to last year’s bonanza staged at the Wollman Rink in Central Park, the luxury outerwear label took over New York’s famed Gotham Hall as the setting to present its Grenoble label's Fall collection. Staged in the foyer of the hall, Moncler enlisted an army of models (who have to be credited for standing rod still) arranged stadium-style, above spectators. Dressed in an enviable array of winter separates in a sea of green, this was technical fashion at its best. Quilted puffer jackets were teamed with knitted sleeve gloves and fur stoles. In keeping with the Grenoble label’s ethos of reinterpreting vintage styles for the modern day, the nostalgic glamour of the collection will be as equal a hit on the slopes or on the streets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Moncler Grenoble

Few fashion houses can put on a presentation like Moncler. In a follow-up effort to last year’s bonanza staged at the Wollman Rink in Central Park, the luxury outerwear label took over New York’s famed Gotham Hall as the setting to present its Grenoble label's Fall collection. Staged in the foyer of the hall, Moncler enlisted an army of models (who have to be credited for standing rod still) arranged stadium-style, above spectators. Dressed in an enviable array of winter separates in a sea of green, this was technical fashion at its best. Quilted puffer jackets were teamed with knitted sleeve gloves and fur stoles. In keeping with the Grenoble label’s ethos of reinterpreting vintage styles for the modern day, the nostalgic glamour of the collection will be as equal a hit on the slopes or on the streets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Altuzarra

For Fall, Joseph Altuzarra literally looked to the streets for inspiration for his mostly monochromatic collection. Beneath the graphic grit, the collection was seductive and vampiric through and through. Shiny zips meandered up slinky cocktail dresses crafted from sheer chiffon and felted wool. Fur was also abundantly present: appearing as a hypnotic black and white intarsia coat, skunk-striped oversized mittens and even incorporated into the bodice of dresses. This was power dressing at its best, with studded pencil skirts slashed up to the thigh and wide open necklines to showcase the décolleté. Finished off with mussed up hair and moody crimson eyeshadow, it was impossible not to fall under Altuzarra's spell.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Altuzarra

For Fall, Joseph Altuzarra literally looked to the streets for inspiration for his mostly monochromatic collection. Beneath the graphic grit, the collection was seductive and vampiric through and through. Shiny zips meandered up slinky cocktail dresses crafted from sheer chiffon and felted wool. Fur was also abundantly present: appearing as a hypnotic black and white intarsia coat, skunk-striped oversized mittens and even incorporated into the bodice of dresses. This was power dressing at its best, with studded pencil skirts slashed up to the thigh and wide open necklines to showcase the décolleté. Finished off with mussed up hair and moody crimson eyeshadow, it was impossible not to fall under Altuzarra's spell.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Altuzarra

For Fall, Joseph Altuzarra literally looked to the streets for inspiration for his mostly monochromatic collection. Beneath the graphic grit, the collection was seductive and vampiric through and through. Shiny zips meandered up slinky cocktail dresses crafted from sheer chiffon and felted wool. Fur was also abundantly present: appearing as a hypnotic black and white intarsia coat, skunk-striped oversized mittens and even incorporated into the bodice of dresses. This was power dressing at its best, with studded pencil skirts slashed up to the thigh and wide open necklines to showcase the décolleté. Finished off with mussed up hair and moody crimson eyeshadow, it was impossible not to fall under Altuzarra's spell.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Altuzarra

For Fall, Joseph Altuzarra literally looked to the streets for inspiration for his mostly monochromatic collection. Beneath the graphic grit, the collection was seductive and vampiric through and through. Shiny zips meandered up slinky cocktail dresses crafted from sheer chiffon and felted wool. Fur was also abundantly present: appearing as a hypnotic black and white intarsia coat, skunk-striped oversized mittens and even incorporated into the bodice of dresses. This was power dressing at its best, with studded pencil skirts slashed up to the thigh and wide open necklines to showcase the décolleté. Finished off with mussed up hair and moody crimson eyeshadow, it was impossible not to fall under Altuzarra's spell.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Altuzarra

For Fall, Joseph Altuzarra literally looked to the streets for inspiration for his mostly monochromatic collection. Beneath the graphic grit, the collection was seductive and vampiric through and through. Shiny zips meandered up slinky cocktail dresses crafted from sheer chiffon and felted wool. Fur was also abundantly present: appearing as a hypnotic black and white intarsia coat, skunk-striped oversized mittens and even incorporated into the bodice of dresses. This was power dressing at its best, with studded pencil skirts slashed up to the thigh and wide open necklines to showcase the décolleté. Finished off with mussed up hair and moody crimson eyeshadow, it was impossible not to fall under Altuzarra's spell.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Victoria Beckham

Although the seasoned fashion plate continued to deliver the structured power dresses and leather handbags that have become her signature, Victoria Beckham's Fall collection possessed clout. Working in a primary palette of black, cobalt blue and lemon, Beckham alternated between ladylike ensembles - slinky silk blouses belted over pencil skirts (slit to the hilt, of course), and jaunty, shift dresses that were paired with skinny knitted turtlenecks. Interspersed throughout was an impressive array of coats that took on a more masculine shape. One particularly memorable example came in brushed wool and was long, sleeveless and loosely belted. Despite her celebrity status, there was an effort to keep things real: models donned a sexy, mussed up ponytail, conceived by Guido Palau, to counterpoint to all the refinement.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Victoria Beckham

Although the seasoned fashion plate continued to deliver the structured power dresses and leather handbags that have become her signature, Victoria Beckham's Fall collection possessed clout. Working in a primary palette of black, cobalt blue and lemon, Beckham alternated between ladylike ensembles - slinky silk blouses belted over pencil skirts (slit to the hilt, of course), and jaunty, shift dresses that were paired with skinny knitted turtlenecks. Interspersed throughout was an impressive array of coats that took on a more masculine shape. One particularly memorable example came in brushed wool and was long, sleeveless and loosely belted. Despite her celebrity status, there was an effort to keep things real: models donned a sexy, mussed up ponytail, conceived by Guido Palau, to counterpoint to all the refinement.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Victoria Beckham

Although the seasoned fashion plate continued to deliver the structured power dresses and leather handbags that have become her signature, Victoria Beckham's Fall collection possessed clout. Working in a primary palette of black, cobalt blue and lemon, Beckham alternated between ladylike ensembles - slinky silk blouses belted over pencil skirts (slit to the hilt, of course), and jaunty, shift dresses that were paired with skinny knitted turtlenecks. Interspersed throughout was an impressive array of coats that took on a more masculine shape. One particularly memorable example came in brushed wool and was long, sleeveless and loosely belted. Despite her celebrity status, there was an effort to keep things real: models donned a sexy, mussed up ponytail, conceived by Guido Palau, to counterpoint to all the refinement.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Victoria Beckham

Although the seasoned fashion plate continued to deliver the structured power dresses and leather handbags that have become her signature, Victoria Beckham's Fall collection possessed clout. Working in a primary palette of black, cobalt blue and lemon, Beckham alternated between ladylike ensembles - slinky silk blouses belted over pencil skirts (slit to the hilt, of course), and jaunty, shift dresses that were paired with skinny knitted turtlenecks. Interspersed throughout was an impressive array of coats that took on a more masculine shape. One particularly memorable example came in brushed wool and was long, sleeveless and loosely belted. Despite her celebrity status, there was an effort to keep things real: models donned a sexy, mussed up ponytail, conceived by Guido Palau, to counterpoint to all the refinement.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Victoria Beckham

Although the seasoned fashion plate continued to deliver the structured power dresses and leather handbags that have become her signature, Victoria Beckham's Fall collection possessed clout. Working in a primary palette of black, cobalt blue and lemon, Beckham alternated between ladylike ensembles - slinky silk blouses belted over pencil skirts (slit to the hilt, of course), and jaunty, shift dresses that were paired with skinny knitted turtlenecks. Interspersed throughout was an impressive array of coats that took on a more masculine shape. One particularly memorable example came in brushed wool and was long, sleeveless and loosely belted. Despite her celebrity status, there was an effort to keep things real: models donned a sexy, mussed up ponytail, conceived by Guido Palau, to counterpoint to all the refinement.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Thakoon

Thakoon Panichgul offered a respite from the greyness, minimalism and restraint that typically permeates the Fall season, embracing print and colour. Whimsical dandelion and sequin prints, dusty pink and blue florals, and cheetah-spotted goat skin coats took many a breath away. Blush-toned fur shawls were elegantly draped over silk dresses and belted at the waist. Despite the overt girly-ness, such as the floral dresses riddled with revealing lace insets, Thakoon still gave the collection some bite. Models wore asymmetric baby fringes and bejewelled ear-cuffs for a mildly cyber-punk effect. We've also added the mid-height pilgrim loafers by Laurence Decade in gold and silver to next season's shopping list.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Thakoon

Thakoon Panichgul offered a respite from the greyness, minimalism and restraint that typically permeates the Fall season, embracing print and colour. Whimsical dandelion and sequin prints, dusty pink and blue florals, and cheetah-spotted goat skin coats took many a breath away. Blush-toned fur shawls were elegantly draped over silk dresses and belted at the waist. Despite the overt girly-ness, such as the floral dresses riddled with revealing lace insets, Thakoon still gave the collection some bite. Models wore asymmetric baby fringes and bejewelled ear-cuffs for a mildly cyber-punk effect. We've also added the mid-height pilgrim loafers by Laurence Decade in gold and silver to next season's shopping list.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Thakoon

Thakoon Panichgul offered a respite from the greyness, minimalism and restraint that typically permeates the Fall season, embracing print and colour. Whimsical dandelion and sequin prints, dusty pink and blue florals, and cheetah-spotted goat skin coats took many a breath away. Blush-toned fur shawls were elegantly draped over silk dresses and belted at the waist. Despite the overt girly-ness, such as the floral dresses riddled with revealing lace insets, Thakoon still gave the collection some bite. Models wore asymmetric baby fringes and bejewelled ear-cuffs for a mildly cyber-punk effect. We've also added the mid-height pilgrim loafers by Laurence Decade in gold and silver to next season's shopping list.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Thakoon

Thakoon Panichgul offered a respite from the greyness, minimalism and restraint that typically permeates the Fall season, embracing print and colour. Whimsical dandelion and sequin prints, dusty pink and blue florals, and cheetah-spotted goat skin coats took many a breath away. Blush-toned fur shawls were elegantly draped over silk dresses and belted at the waist. Despite the overt girly-ness, such as the floral dresses riddled with revealing lace insets, Thakoon still gave the collection some bite. Models wore asymmetric baby fringes and bejewelled ear-cuffs for a mildly cyber-punk effect. We've also added the mid-height pilgrim loafers by Laurence Decade in gold and silver to next season's shopping list.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Thakoon

Thakoon Panichgul offered a respite from the greyness, minimalism and restraint that typically permeates the Fall season, embracing print and colour. Whimsical dandelion and sequin prints, dusty pink and blue florals, and cheetah-spotted goat skin coats took many a breath away. Blush-toned fur shawls were elegantly draped over silk dresses and belted at the waist. Despite the overt girly-ness, such as the floral dresses riddled with revealing lace insets, Thakoon still gave the collection some bite. Models wore asymmetric baby fringes and bejewelled ear-cuffs for a mildly cyber-punk effect. We've also added the mid-height pilgrim loafers by Laurence Decade in gold and silver to next season's shopping list.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Y-3

The broad appeal of Adidas' Y-3 label was strong enough to fill an industrial warehouse on the Lower East Side at the end of a busy fashion Sunday. The urban sports label presented new interpretations of its signature styles in keeping with the season's 'Future Thrift' theme. Yohji Yamamoto's vision of what we may be wearing in light years to come had a distinct sports-punk attitude. Day-Glo shades of green, orange and yellow appeared on all-black, amorphous pieces, like swarthy ball skirts, ruffled capes and parkas, which featured button-up hems, snap-away trimming and removable elements. On the Men's front, there was a jolt of pattern, with oversized houndstooth and abstracted camouflage prints dominating tailored ensembles. All eyes were on footwear of course, which ran the gamut of geisha-esque platform trainers and velvet hiking boots for women and high-top oxfords with elements of basketball, cross-training and running shoes for men.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Y-3

The broad appeal of Adidas' Y-3 label was strong enough to fill an industrial warehouse on the Lower East Side at the end of a busy fashion Sunday. The urban sports label presented new interpretations of its signature styles in keeping with the season's 'Future Thrift' theme. Yohji Yamamoto's vision of what we may be wearing in light years to come had a distinct sports-punk attitude. Day-Glo shades of green, orange and yellow appeared on all-black, amorphous pieces, like swarthy ball skirts, ruffled capes and parkas, which featured button-up hems, snap-away trimming and removable elements. On the Men's front, there was a jolt of pattern, with oversized houndstooth and abstracted camouflage prints dominating tailored ensembles. All eyes were on footwear of course, which ran the gamut of geisha-esque platform trainers and velvet hiking boots for women and high-top oxfords with elements of basketball, cross-training and running shoes for men.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Y-3

The broad appeal of Adidas' Y-3 label was strong enough to fill an industrial warehouse on the Lower East Side at the end of a busy fashion Sunday. The urban sports label presented new interpretations of its signature styles in keeping with the season's 'Future Thrift' theme. Yohji Yamamoto's vision of what we may be wearing in light years to come had a distinct sports-punk attitude. Day-Glo shades of green, orange and yellow appeared on all-black, amorphous pieces, like swarthy ball skirts, ruffled capes and parkas, which featured button-up hems, snap-away trimming and removable elements. On the Men's front, there was a jolt of pattern, with oversized houndstooth and abstracted camouflage prints dominating tailored ensembles. All eyes were on footwear of course, which ran the gamut of geisha-esque platform trainers and velvet hiking boots for women and high-top oxfords with elements of basketball, cross-training and running shoes for men.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Y-3

The broad appeal of Adidas' Y-3 label was strong enough to fill an industrial warehouse on the Lower East Side at the end of a busy fashion Sunday. The urban sports label presented new interpretations of its signature styles in keeping with the season's 'Future Thrift' theme. Yohji Yamamoto's vision of what we may be wearing in light years to come had a distinct sports-punk attitude. Day-Glo shades of green, orange and yellow appeared on all-black, amorphous pieces, like swarthy ball skirts, ruffled capes and parkas, which featured button-up hems, snap-away trimming and removable elements. On the Men's front, there was a jolt of pattern, with oversized houndstooth and abstracted camouflage prints dominating tailored ensembles. All eyes were on footwear of course, which ran the gamut of geisha-esque platform trainers and velvet hiking boots for women and high-top oxfords with elements of basketball, cross-training and running shoes for men.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Y-3

The broad appeal of Adidas' Y-3 label was strong enough to fill an industrial warehouse on the Lower East Side at the end of a busy fashion Sunday. The urban sports label presented new interpretations of its signature styles in keeping with the season's 'Future Thrift' theme. Yohji Yamamoto's vision of what we may be wearing in light years to come had a distinct sports-punk attitude. Day-Glo shades of green, orange and yellow appeared on all-black, amorphous pieces, like swarthy ball skirts, ruffled capes and parkas, which featured button-up hems, snap-away trimming and removable elements. On the Men's front, there was a jolt of pattern, with oversized houndstooth and abstracted camouflage prints dominating tailored ensembles. All eyes were on footwear of course, which ran the gamut of geisha-esque platform trainers and velvet hiking boots for women and high-top oxfords with elements of basketball, cross-training and running shoes for men.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Tommy Hilfiger

There are rarely any surprises at Tommy Hilfiger and having racked up almost 30 years of being in the business, there is no good reason to. But who would have thought the king of American sportswear would take a page from the British Isles? The veteran designer looked to Tommy Nutter, London's tailor du jour in the 1960s, for inspiration and subsequently put forth a series of transatlantic mash-ups - all in the prepster vein, of course. Prince of Wales checks were mixed with white-collared, pinstriped shirts, in the label's synonymous shades of red, white and blue - while pea coats were fused with trench coat features, with a good dose of houndstooth into the mix. Double-breasted details appeared repeatedly, on anything as varied as blazers and shearling-trimmed jackets to coat dresses that possessed a distinct sex appeal. Altogether it was an unadulterated dose of prep that did not disappoint.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Tommy Hilfiger

There are rarely any surprises at Tommy Hilfiger and having racked up almost 30 years of being in the business, there is no good reason to. But who would have thought the king of American sportswear would take a page from the British Isles? The veteran designer looked to Tommy Nutter, London's tailor du jour in the 1960s, for inspiration and subsequently put forth a series of transatlantic mash-ups - all in the prepster vein, of course. Prince of Wales checks were mixed with white-collared, pinstriped shirts, in the label's synonymous shades of red, white and blue - while pea coats were fused with trench coat features, with a good dose of houndstooth into the mix. Double-breasted details appeared repeatedly, on anything as varied as blazers and shearling-trimmed jackets to coat dresses that possessed a distinct sex appeal. Altogether it was an unadulterated dose of prep that did not disappoint.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Tommy Hilfiger

There are rarely any surprises at Tommy Hilfiger and having racked up almost 30 years of being in the business, there is no good reason to. But who would have thought the king of American sportswear would take a page from the British Isles? The veteran designer looked to Tommy Nutter, London's tailor du jour in the 1960s, for inspiration and subsequently put forth a series of transatlantic mash-ups - all in the prepster vein, of course. Prince of Wales checks were mixed with white-collared, pinstriped shirts, in the label's synonymous shades of red, white and blue - while pea coats were fused with trench coat features, with a good dose of houndstooth into the mix. Double-breasted details appeared repeatedly, on anything as varied as blazers and shearling-trimmed jackets to coat dresses that possessed a distinct sex appeal. Altogether it was an unadulterated dose of prep that did not disappoint.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Tommy Hilfiger

There are rarely any surprises at Tommy Hilfiger and having racked up almost 30 years of being in the business, there is no good reason to. But who would have thought the king of American sportswear would take a page from the British Isles? The veteran designer looked to Tommy Nutter, London's tailor du jour in the 1960s, for inspiration and subsequently put forth a series of transatlantic mash-ups - all in the prepster vein, of course. Prince of Wales checks were mixed with white-collared, pinstriped shirts, in the label's synonymous shades of red, white and blue - while pea coats were fused with trench coat features, with a good dose of houndstooth into the mix. Double-breasted details appeared repeatedly, on anything as varied as blazers and shearling-trimmed jackets to coat dresses that possessed a distinct sex appeal. Altogether it was an unadulterated dose of prep that did not disappoint.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Tommy Hilfiger

There are rarely any surprises at Tommy Hilfiger and having racked up almost 30 years of being in the business, there is no good reason to. But who would have thought the king of American sportswear would take a page from the British Isles? The veteran designer looked to Tommy Nutter, London's tailor du jour in the 1960s, for inspiration and subsequently put forth a series of transatlantic mash-ups - all in the prepster vein, of course. Prince of Wales checks were mixed with white-collared, pinstriped shirts, in the label's synonymous shades of red, white and blue - while pea coats were fused with trench coat features, with a good dose of houndstooth into the mix. Double-breasted details appeared repeatedly, on anything as varied as blazers and shearling-trimmed jackets to coat dresses that possessed a distinct sex appeal. Altogether it was an unadulterated dose of prep that did not disappoint.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Belstaff

Belstaff is on the relaunch warpath, which means the outerwear for which the company is known and loved, is just but one of its current offerings.  There are now skirt suits, studded dresses and skintight trouser and jacket sets to accompany a bevy of great looking boxy, oversized coats. Still, an undercurrent of that sporty outerwear made its way onto nearly every look, so that the suits were cut from olive wool felt or the same waxy black fabric Belstaff uses for its zipper and gold studded biker jackets. It made for a tailoring-heavy, rather masculine Women’s collection, but the variety of cool outerwear options is what makes this label one to watch. The tape-edged, colour-blocked leather jackets and woolly shearling hooded jackets hit just the right tone of sleek sportiness.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Belstaff

Belstaff is on the relaunch warpath, which means the outerwear for which the company is known and loved, is just but one of its current offerings.  There are now skirt suits, studded dresses and skintight trouser and jacket sets to accompany a bevy of great looking boxy, oversized coats. Still, an undercurrent of that sporty outerwear made its way onto nearly every look, so that the suits were cut from olive wool felt or the same waxy black fabric Belstaff uses for its zipper and gold studded biker jackets. It made for a tailoring-heavy, rather masculine Women’s collection, but the variety of cool outerwear options is what makes this label one to watch. The tape-edged, colour-blocked leather jackets and woolly shearling hooded jackets hit just the right tone of sleek sportiness.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Belstaff

Belstaff is on the relaunch warpath, which means the outerwear for which the company is known and loved, is just but one of its current offerings.  There are now skirt suits, studded dresses and skintight trouser and jacket sets to accompany a bevy of great looking boxy, oversized coats. Still, an undercurrent of that sporty outerwear made its way onto nearly every look, so that the suits were cut from olive wool felt or the same waxy black fabric Belstaff uses for its zipper and gold studded biker jackets. It made for a tailoring-heavy, rather masculine Women’s collection, but the variety of cool outerwear options is what makes this label one to watch. The tape-edged, colour-blocked leather jackets and woolly shearling hooded jackets hit just the right tone of sleek sportiness.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Belstaff

Belstaff is on the relaunch warpath, which means the outerwear for which the company is known and loved, is just but one of its current offerings.  There are now skirt suits, studded dresses and skintight trouser and jacket sets to accompany a bevy of great looking boxy, oversized coats. Still, an undercurrent of that sporty outerwear made its way onto nearly every look, so that the suits were cut from olive wool felt or the same waxy black fabric Belstaff uses for its zipper and gold studded biker jackets. It made for a tailoring-heavy, rather masculine Women’s collection, but the variety of cool outerwear options is what makes this label one to watch. The tape-edged, colour-blocked leather jackets and woolly shearling hooded jackets hit just the right tone of sleek sportiness.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Belstaff

Belstaff is on the relaunch warpath, which means the outerwear for which the company is known and loved, is just but one of its current offerings.  There are now skirt suits, studded dresses and skintight trouser and jacket sets to accompany a bevy of great looking boxy, oversized coats. Still, an undercurrent of that sporty outerwear made its way onto nearly every look, so that the suits were cut from olive wool felt or the same waxy black fabric Belstaff uses for its zipper and gold studded biker jackets. It made for a tailoring-heavy, rather masculine Women’s collection, but the variety of cool outerwear options is what makes this label one to watch. The tape-edged, colour-blocked leather jackets and woolly shearling hooded jackets hit just the right tone of sleek sportiness.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Theyskens' Theory

Olivier Theyskens continued to prove that his team-up with mega-brand Theory has done little to dilute his couturier's touch. Working in a neutral palette of grey, mink, ice-blue and cream, the avant-garde designer showed an architectural collection that would whet any minimalist's palate. Tailored pieces made a slight nod to the 1990s - elongated blazers that were worn over leather mini skirts, and shorts boasting boxy shapes, while wide-legged trousers in checked wool and quilted cotton fell just so. There were also distinct masculine overtones that manifested themselves in broad-collared, oversized coats, which draped way past the knee. Ever the constructionist, Theyskens presented several cocoon-shaped mini-dresses made from matelassé fabrics for a seductive visual effect. Other fabric highlights included mottled mohair jumpers and steely sequinned jackets and dresses, which gave the otherwise classic collection a healthy dose of cool attitude.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Theyskens' Theory

Olivier Theyskens continued to prove that his team-up with mega-brand Theory has done little to dilute his couturier's touch. Working in a neutral palette of grey, mink, ice-blue and cream, the avant-garde designer showed an architectural collection that would whet any minimalist's palate. Tailored pieces made a slight nod to the 1990s - elongated blazers that were worn over leather mini skirts, and shorts boasting boxy shapes, while wide-legged trousers in checked wool and quilted cotton fell just so. There were also distinct masculine overtones that manifested themselves in broad-collared, oversized coats, which draped way past the knee. Ever the constructionist, Theyskens presented several cocoon-shaped mini-dresses made from matelassé fabrics for a seductive visual effect. Other fabric highlights included mottled mohair jumpers and steely sequinned jackets and dresses, which gave the otherwise classic collection a healthy dose of cool attitude.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Theyskens' Theory

Olivier Theyskens continued to prove that his team-up with mega-brand Theory has done little to dilute his couturier's touch. Working in a neutral palette of grey, mink, ice-blue and cream, the avant-garde designer showed an architectural collection that would whet any minimalist's palate. Tailored pieces made a slight nod to the 1990s - elongated blazers that were worn over leather mini skirts, and shorts boasting boxy shapes, while wide-legged trousers in checked wool and quilted cotton fell just so. There were also distinct masculine overtones that manifested themselves in broad-collared, oversized coats, which draped way past the knee. Ever the constructionist, Theyskens presented several cocoon-shaped mini-dresses made from matelassé fabrics for a seductive visual effect. Other fabric highlights included mottled mohair jumpers and steely sequinned jackets and dresses, which gave the otherwise classic collection a healthy dose of cool attitude.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Theyskens' Theory

Olivier Theyskens continued to prove that his team-up with mega-brand Theory has done little to dilute his couturier's touch. Working in a neutral palette of grey, mink, ice-blue and cream, the avant-garde designer showed an architectural collection that would whet any minimalist's palate. Tailored pieces made a slight nod to the 1990s - elongated blazers that were worn over leather mini skirts, and shorts boasting boxy shapes, while wide-legged trousers in checked wool and quilted cotton fell just so. There were also distinct masculine overtones that manifested themselves in broad-collared, oversized coats, which draped way past the knee. Ever the constructionist, Theyskens presented several cocoon-shaped mini-dresses made from matelassé fabrics for a seductive visual effect. Other fabric highlights included mottled mohair jumpers and steely sequinned jackets and dresses, which gave the otherwise classic collection a healthy dose of cool attitude.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Theyskens' Theory

Olivier Theyskens continued to prove that his team-up with mega-brand Theory has done little to dilute his couturier's touch. Working in a neutral palette of grey, mink, ice-blue and cream, the avant-garde designer showed an architectural collection that would whet any minimalist's palate. Tailored pieces made a slight nod to the 1990s - elongated blazers that were worn over leather mini skirts, and shorts boasting boxy shapes, while wide-legged trousers in checked wool and quilted cotton fell just so. There were also distinct masculine overtones that manifested themselves in broad-collared, oversized coats, which draped way past the knee. Ever the constructionist, Theyskens presented several cocoon-shaped mini-dresses made from matelassé fabrics for a seductive visual effect. Other fabric highlights included mottled mohair jumpers and steely sequinned jackets and dresses, which gave the otherwise classic collection a healthy dose of cool attitude.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Donna Karan

Donna Karan's models, swathed in yards of asymmetrically cut jersey, looked like young versions of the earth-mother designer herself. With dramatic cape constructions and trailing trains of fabric, the body-skimming dresses gave models the look of a warrior princess caught in the woods. In addition to the bluntly-cut pony tail extensions (which is the one thing the designer herself would never don), Karan was fixated on deep slits across the shoulders or on skirt fronts that were emphasised by fabric that wrapped and wound around the body. Equally organic was the earthy palette of browns and golden bronzes, which steered the collection firmly away from anything frilly or overtly romantic.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Donna Karan

Donna Karan's models, swathed in yards of asymmetrically cut jersey, looked like young versions of the earth-mother designer herself. With dramatic cape constructions and trailing trains of fabric, the body-skimming dresses gave models the look of a warrior princess caught in the woods. In addition to the bluntly-cut pony tail extensions (which is the one thing the designer herself would never don), Karan was fixated on deep slits across the shoulders or on skirt fronts that were emphasised by fabric that wrapped and wound around the body. Equally organic was the earthy palette of browns and golden bronzes, which steered the collection firmly away from anything frilly or overtly romantic.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Donna Karan

Donna Karan's models, swathed in yards of asymmetrically cut jersey, looked like young versions of the earth-mother designer herself. With dramatic cape constructions and trailing trains of fabric, the body-skimming dresses gave models the look of a warrior princess caught in the woods. In addition to the bluntly-cut pony tail extensions (which is the one thing the designer herself would never don), Karan was fixated on deep slits across the shoulders or on skirt fronts that were emphasised by fabric that wrapped and wound around the body. Equally organic was the earthy palette of browns and golden bronzes, which steered the collection firmly away from anything frilly or overtly romantic.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Donna Karan

Donna Karan's models, swathed in yards of asymmetrically cut jersey, looked like young versions of the earth-mother designer herself. With dramatic cape constructions and trailing trains of fabric, the body-skimming dresses gave models the look of a warrior princess caught in the woods. In addition to the bluntly-cut pony tail extensions (which is the one thing the designer herself would never don), Karan was fixated on deep slits across the shoulders or on skirt fronts that were emphasised by fabric that wrapped and wound around the body. Equally organic was the earthy palette of browns and golden bronzes, which steered the collection firmly away from anything frilly or overtly romantic.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Donna Karan

Donna Karan's models, swathed in yards of asymmetrically cut jersey, looked like young versions of the earth-mother designer herself. With dramatic cape constructions and trailing trains of fabric, the body-skimming dresses gave models the look of a warrior princess caught in the woods. In addition to the bluntly-cut pony tail extensions (which is the one thing the designer herself would never don), Karan was fixated on deep slits across the shoulders or on skirt fronts that were emphasised by fabric that wrapped and wound around the body. Equally organic was the earthy palette of browns and golden bronzes, which steered the collection firmly away from anything frilly or overtly romantic.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Marc by Marc Jacobs

In what was an otherwise retro-heavy fashion collection for his second line, Marc Jacobs teased the living daylights out of his model's hair, creating a mad, fabulous mess that is every modern girl's morning reality. The silhouettes of the clothes, meanwhile, were body-skimming and office appropriate for any woman behind a desk from the 1960s onwards. Belted pencil skirts covered in oversized geometric prints, hard case handbags, and cropped voluminous trousers made for a polished, neat look. Best of all were the tomato red culottes paired with a red and burgundy blocked sweater and the candy apple red hat box - all of which were just as juicy as the model's gleaming lips.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Marc by Marc Jacobs

In what was an otherwise retro-heavy fashion collection for his second line, Marc Jacobs teased the living daylights out of his model's hair, creating a mad, fabulous mess that is every modern girl's morning reality. The silhouettes of the clothes, meanwhile, were body-skimming and office appropriate for any woman behind a desk from the 1960s onwards. Belted pencil skirts covered in oversized geometric prints, hard case handbags, and cropped voluminous trousers made for a polished, neat look. Best of all were the tomato red culottes paired with a red and burgundy blocked sweater and the candy apple red hat box - all of which were just as juicy as the model's gleaming lips.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Marc by Marc Jacobs

In what was an otherwise retro-heavy fashion collection for his second line, Marc Jacobs teased the living daylights out of his model's hair, creating a mad, fabulous mess that is every modern girl's morning reality. The silhouettes of the clothes, meanwhile, were body-skimming and office appropriate for any woman behind a desk from the 1960s onwards. Belted pencil skirts covered in oversized geometric prints, hard case handbags, and cropped voluminous trousers made for a polished, neat look. Best of all were the tomato red culottes paired with a red and burgundy blocked sweater and the candy apple red hat box - all of which were just as juicy as the model's gleaming lips.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Marc by Marc Jacobs

In what was an otherwise retro-heavy fashion collection for his second line, Marc Jacobs teased the living daylights out of his model's hair, creating a mad, fabulous mess that is every modern girl's morning reality. The silhouettes of the clothes, meanwhile, were body-skimming and office appropriate for any woman behind a desk from the 1960s onwards. Belted pencil skirts covered in oversized geometric prints, hard case handbags, and cropped voluminous trousers made for a polished, neat look. Best of all were the tomato red culottes paired with a red and burgundy blocked sweater and the candy apple red hat box - all of which were just as juicy as the model's gleaming lips.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Marc by Marc Jacobs

In what was an otherwise retro-heavy fashion collection for his second line, Marc Jacobs teased the living daylights out of his model's hair, creating a mad, fabulous mess that is every modern girl's morning reality. The silhouettes of the clothes, meanwhile, were body-skimming and office appropriate for any woman behind a desk from the 1960s onwards. Belted pencil skirts covered in oversized geometric prints, hard case handbags, and cropped voluminous trousers made for a polished, neat look. Best of all were the tomato red culottes paired with a red and burgundy blocked sweater and the candy apple red hat box - all of which were just as juicy as the model's gleaming lips.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

3.1 Phillip Lim

Phillip Lim has a terrific commercial business and with his most recent line-up of piece-driven separates, it's not hard to understand why. The American designer has a knack for single item stars, whether it's a bandage legging, a hybrid leather biker jacket, or his new sleeveless quilted coats. What was most successful about this collection was the fresh styling that seamed up his separates in an original way. A cognac coloured leather top, for example, sat successfully under an oversized emerald wool coat and voluminous black tuxedo trousers. Meanwhile the knee-guard boots with bare toes poking out of their sandal fronts gave an edgy kick to airy cropped shorts and super mini skirts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

3.1 Phillip Lim

Phillip Lim has a terrific commercial business and with his most recent line-up of piece-driven separates, it's not hard to understand why. The American designer has a knack for single item stars, whether it's a bandage legging, a hybrid leather biker jacket, or his new sleeveless quilted coats. What was most successful about this collection was the fresh styling that seamed up his separates in an original way. A cognac coloured leather top, for example, sat successfully under an oversized emerald wool coat and voluminous black tuxedo trousers. Meanwhile the knee-guard boots with bare toes poking out of their sandal fronts gave an edgy kick to airy cropped shorts and super mini skirts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

3.1 Phillip Lim

Phillip Lim has a terrific commercial business and with his most recent line-up of piece-driven separates, it's not hard to understand why. The American designer has a knack for single item stars, whether it's a bandage legging, a hybrid leather biker jacket, or his new sleeveless quilted coats. What was most successful about this collection was the fresh styling that seamed up his separates in an original way. A cognac coloured leather top, for example, sat successfully under an oversized emerald wool coat and voluminous black tuxedo trousers. Meanwhile the knee-guard boots with bare toes poking out of their sandal fronts gave an edgy kick to airy cropped shorts and super mini skirts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

3.1 Phillip Lim

Phillip Lim has a terrific commercial business and with his most recent line-up of piece-driven separates, it's not hard to understand why. The American designer has a knack for single item stars, whether it's a bandage legging, a hybrid leather biker jacket, or his new sleeveless quilted coats. What was most successful about this collection was the fresh styling that seamed up his separates in an original way. A cognac coloured leather top, for example, sat successfully under an oversized emerald wool coat and voluminous black tuxedo trousers. Meanwhile the knee-guard boots with bare toes poking out of their sandal fronts gave an edgy kick to airy cropped shorts and super mini skirts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

3.1 Phillip Lim

Phillip Lim has a terrific commercial business and with his most recent line-up of piece-driven separates, it's not hard to understand why. The American designer has a knack for single item stars, whether it's a bandage legging, a hybrid leather biker jacket, or his new sleeveless quilted coats. What was most successful about this collection was the fresh styling that seamed up his separates in an original way. A cognac coloured leather top, for example, sat successfully under an oversized emerald wool coat and voluminous black tuxedo trousers. Meanwhile the knee-guard boots with bare toes poking out of their sandal fronts gave an edgy kick to airy cropped shorts and super mini skirts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Thom Browne

Thom Browne's creativity single-handedly keeps the pulse of New York fashion week above a flatline. The designer consistently provides a fearless vision of fashion - part costume, part theatre and all fantasy. This season's romp borrowed padded wasp waists from the 18th century and sculpted mammoth shoulders from steroid popping fashion linebackers. Lips were tucked into red kisses, cheeks were highly rouged and legs were slipped into fine white tights with a tangle of 3D rose vines. Of course Browne is a menswear designer by trade, so his tie print jacquards and mannish tailoring also got thrown into the mix, creating a wild creative mash-up that made his audience smile.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Thom Browne

Thom Browne's creativity single-handedly keeps the pulse of New York fashion week above a flatline. The designer consistently provides a fearless vision of fashion - part costume, part theatre and all fantasy. This season's romp borrowed padded wasp waists from the 18th century and sculpted mammoth shoulders from steroid popping fashion linebackers. Lips were tucked into red kisses, cheeks were highly rouged and legs were slipped into fine white tights with a tangle of 3D rose vines. Of course Browne is a menswear designer by trade, so his tie print jacquards and mannish tailoring also got thrown into the mix, creating a wild creative mash-up that made his audience smile.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Thom Browne

Thom Browne's creativity single-handedly keeps the pulse of New York fashion week above a flatline. The designer consistently provides a fearless vision of fashion - part costume, part theatre and all fantasy. This season's romp borrowed padded wasp waists from the 18th century and sculpted mammoth shoulders from steroid popping fashion linebackers. Lips were tucked into red kisses, cheeks were highly rouged and legs were slipped into fine white tights with a tangle of 3D rose vines. Of course Browne is a menswear designer by trade, so his tie print jacquards and mannish tailoring also got thrown into the mix, creating a wild creative mash-up that made his audience smile.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Thom Browne

Thom Browne's creativity single-handedly keeps the pulse of New York fashion week above a flatline. The designer consistently provides a fearless vision of fashion - part costume, part theatre and all fantasy. This season's romp borrowed padded wasp waists from the 18th century and sculpted mammoth shoulders from steroid popping fashion linebackers. Lips were tucked into red kisses, cheeks were highly rouged and legs were slipped into fine white tights with a tangle of 3D rose vines. Of course Browne is a menswear designer by trade, so his tie print jacquards and mannish tailoring also got thrown into the mix, creating a wild creative mash-up that made his audience smile.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Thom Browne

Thom Browne's creativity single-handedly keeps the pulse of New York fashion week above a flatline. The designer consistently provides a fearless vision of fashion - part costume, part theatre and all fantasy. This season's romp borrowed padded wasp waists from the 18th century and sculpted mammoth shoulders from steroid popping fashion linebackers. Lips were tucked into red kisses, cheeks were highly rouged and legs were slipped into fine white tights with a tangle of 3D rose vines. Of course Browne is a menswear designer by trade, so his tie print jacquards and mannish tailoring also got thrown into the mix, creating a wild creative mash-up that made his audience smile.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Rodarte

Even when taking a turn down a more subversive creative path, sisters Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte are never more than a knitting needle away from their first love of craft.  Their collections are always imbued with some sort of artsy influence, like this season's fixation with tie-dye techniques. The LA-based designers created unusual takes on formal wear, dipping full-length silk and satin dresses into explosive patterns. More than craft, however, this show's conversation centred around layers - from heavy swathes of leather and suede, cut into voluminous trenches and drape-front coats, all the way to diaphanous drapes of uber light sheer chiffons. Any overriding message of an ongoing theme was fleeting, but the one constant was the stream of 1980s styling paraphernalia: from the ostentatious gold earrings and shirt jewellery, to the leggings and outrageously high-cut bodysuits, whose kinky bikini lines jumped out of wide-cropped pants.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Rodarte

Even when taking a turn down a more subversive creative path, sisters Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte are never more than a knitting needle away from their first love of craft.  Their collections are always imbued with some sort of artsy influence, like this season's fixation with tie-dye techniques. The LA-based designers created unusual takes on formal wear, dipping full-length silk and satin dresses into explosive patterns. More than craft, however, this show's conversation centred around layers - from heavy swathes of leather and suede, cut into voluminous trenches and drape-front coats, all the way to diaphanous drapes of uber light sheer chiffons. Any overriding message of an ongoing theme was fleeting, but the one constant was the stream of 1980s styling paraphernalia: from the ostentatious gold earrings and shirt jewellery, to the leggings and outrageously high-cut bodysuits, whose kinky bikini lines jumped out of wide-cropped pants.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Rodarte

Even when taking a turn down a more subversive creative path, sisters Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte are never more than a knitting needle away from their first love of craft.  Their collections are always imbued with some sort of artsy influence, like this season's fixation with tie-dye techniques. The LA-based designers created unusual takes on formal wear, dipping full-length silk and satin dresses into explosive patterns. More than craft, however, this show's conversation centred around layers - from heavy swathes of leather and suede, cut into voluminous trenches and drape-front coats, all the way to diaphanous drapes of uber light sheer chiffons. Any overriding message of an ongoing theme was fleeting, but the one constant was the stream of 1980s styling paraphernalia: from the ostentatious gold earrings and shirt jewellery, to the leggings and outrageously high-cut bodysuits, whose kinky bikini lines jumped out of wide-cropped pants.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Rodarte

Even when taking a turn down a more subversive creative path, sisters Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte are never more than a knitting needle away from their first love of craft.  Their collections are always imbued with some sort of artsy influence, like this season's fixation with tie-dye techniques. The LA-based designers created unusual takes on formal wear, dipping full-length silk and satin dresses into explosive patterns. More than craft, however, this show's conversation centred around layers - from heavy swathes of leather and suede, cut into voluminous trenches and drape-front coats, all the way to diaphanous drapes of uber light sheer chiffons. Any overriding message of an ongoing theme was fleeting, but the one constant was the stream of 1980s styling paraphernalia: from the ostentatious gold earrings and shirt jewellery, to the leggings and outrageously high-cut bodysuits, whose kinky bikini lines jumped out of wide-cropped pants.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Rodarte

Even when taking a turn down a more subversive creative path, sisters Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte are never more than a knitting needle away from their first love of craft.  Their collections are always imbued with some sort of artsy influence, like this season's fixation with tie-dye techniques. The LA-based designers created unusual takes on formal wear, dipping full-length silk and satin dresses into explosive patterns. More than craft, however, this show's conversation centred around layers - from heavy swathes of leather and suede, cut into voluminous trenches and drape-front coats, all the way to diaphanous drapes of uber light sheer chiffons. Any overriding message of an ongoing theme was fleeting, but the one constant was the stream of 1980s styling paraphernalia: from the ostentatious gold earrings and shirt jewellery, to the leggings and outrageously high-cut bodysuits, whose kinky bikini lines jumped out of wide-cropped pants.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Diesel Black Gold 

Diesel Black Gold has a new creative cop at the head of its label: Andreas Melbostad, formerly of cult brand Phi. New talent or not, nothing can shake Diesel's fascination with a mean pair of skin-bracing, fat-eradicating, denim-inspired trousers. Melbostad created them in every conceivable way - from spray-on leather and glistening waxed cotton versions to the tightest olive coloured wool we've ever laid our eyes on. The only requirement here is that you are in possession of a fierce set of legs, as there is not a millimetre of forgiveness to be found. Also physically challenging were the tiny skirts and motorcross inspired dresses, all cut well above the thigh. For those of us without the excellent gams, there are of course plenty of leather biker jackets with rows of thimble-sized studs. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Diesel Black Gold 

Diesel Black Gold has a new creative cop at the head of its label: Andreas Melbostad, formerly of cult brand Phi. New talent or not, nothing can shake Diesel's fascination with a mean pair of skin-bracing, fat-eradicating, denim-inspired trousers. Melbostad created them in every conceivable way - from spray-on leather and glistening waxed cotton versions to the tightest olive coloured wool we've ever laid our eyes on. The only requirement here is that you are in possession of a fierce set of legs, as there is not a millimetre of forgiveness to be found. Also physically challenging were the tiny skirts and motorcross inspired dresses, all cut well above the thigh. For those of us without the excellent gams, there are of course plenty of leather biker jackets with rows of thimble-sized studs. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

 

Diesel Black Gold 

Diesel Black Gold has a new creative cop at the head of its label: Andreas Melbostad, formerly of cult brand Phi. New talent or not, nothing can shake Diesel's fascination with a mean pair of skin-bracing, fat-eradicating, denim-inspired trousers. Melbostad created them in every conceivable way - from spray-on leather and glistening waxed cotton versions to the tightest olive coloured wool we've ever laid our eyes on. The only requirement here is that you are in possession of a fierce set of legs, as there is not a millimetre of forgiveness to be found. Also physically challenging were the tiny skirts and motorcross inspired dresses, all cut well above the thigh. For those of us without the excellent gams, there are of course plenty of leather biker jackets with rows of thimble-sized studs. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Diesel Black Gold 

Diesel Black Gold has a new creative cop at the head of its label: Andreas Melbostad, formerly of cult brand Phi. New talent or not, nothing can shake Diesel's fascination with a mean pair of skin-bracing, fat-eradicating, denim-inspired trousers. Melbostad created them in every conceivable way - from spray-on leather and glistening waxed cotton versions to the tightest olive coloured wool we've ever laid our eyes on. The only requirement here is that you are in possession of a fierce set of legs, as there is not a millimetre of forgiveness to be found. Also physically challenging were the tiny skirts and motorcross inspired dresses, all cut well above the thigh. For those of us without the excellent gams, there are of course plenty of leather biker jackets with rows of thimble-sized studs. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

 

Diesel Black Gold 

Diesel Black Gold has a new creative cop at the head of its label: Andreas Melbostad, formerly of cult brand Phi. New talent or not, nothing can shake Diesel's fascination with a mean pair of skin-bracing, fat-eradicating, denim-inspired trousers. Melbostad created them in every conceivable way - from spray-on leather and glistening waxed cotton versions to the tightest olive coloured wool we've ever laid our eyes on. The only requirement here is that you are in possession of a fierce set of legs, as there is not a millimetre of forgiveness to be found. Also physically challenging were the tiny skirts and motorcross inspired dresses, all cut well above the thigh. For those of us without the excellent gams, there are of course plenty of leather biker jackets with rows of thimble-sized studs. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Narciso Rodriguez

Narciso Rodriguez has been the king of the slip dress for almost two decades, more than enough time to hone this item into a finely-tuned take on timeless simplicity. This season, he cut his thread strapped V-front dresses shorter at the front than at the back, creating dramatic trains on cocktail dresses and long gowns alike. Surface detail for this minimalist is never going to be more than a subtle whisper; in fact this season Rodriguez played a game of colour blocking, also piecing imperceptible shifts of shiny and matte materials side by side. The tailoring had the same sort of influences, blocked tunics over stovepipe trousers or asymmetrical jackets with shiny trim bands.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Narciso Rodriguez

Narciso Rodriguez has been the king of the slip dress for almost two decades, more than enough time to hone this item into a finely-tuned take on timeless simplicity. This season, he cut his thread strapped V-front dresses shorter at the front than at the back, creating dramatic trains on cocktail dresses and long gowns alike. Surface detail for this minimalist is never going to be more than a subtle whisper; in fact this season Rodriguez played a game of colour blocking, also piecing imperceptible shifts of shiny and matte materials side by side. The tailoring had the same sort of influences, blocked tunics over stovepipe trousers or asymmetrical jackets with shiny trim bands.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Narciso Rodriguez

Narciso Rodriguez has been the king of the slip dress for almost two decades, more than enough time to hone this item into a finely-tuned take on timeless simplicity. This season, he cut his thread strapped V-front dresses shorter at the front than at the back, creating dramatic trains on cocktail dresses and long gowns alike. Surface detail for this minimalist is never going to be more than a subtle whisper; in fact this season Rodriguez played a game of colour blocking, also piecing imperceptible shifts of shiny and matte materials side by side. The tailoring had the same sort of influences, blocked tunics over stovepipe trousers or asymmetrical jackets with shiny trim bands.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Narciso Rodriguez

Narciso Rodriguez has been the king of the slip dress for almost two decades, more than enough time to hone this item into a finely-tuned take on timeless simplicity. This season, he cut his thread strapped V-front dresses shorter at the front than at the back, creating dramatic trains on cocktail dresses and long gowns alike. Surface detail for this minimalist is never going to be more than a subtle whisper; in fact this season Rodriguez played a game of colour blocking, also piecing imperceptible shifts of shiny and matte materials side by side. The tailoring had the same sort of influences, blocked tunics over stovepipe trousers or asymmetrical jackets with shiny trim bands.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Narciso Rodriguez

Narciso Rodriguez has been the king of the slip dress for almost two decades, more than enough time to hone this item into a finely-tuned take on timeless simplicity. This season, he cut his thread strapped V-front dresses shorter at the front than at the back, creating dramatic trains on cocktail dresses and long gowns alike. Surface detail for this minimalist is never going to be more than a subtle whisper; in fact this season Rodriguez played a game of colour blocking, also piecing imperceptible shifts of shiny and matte materials side by side. The tailoring had the same sort of influences, blocked tunics over stovepipe trousers or asymmetrical jackets with shiny trim bands.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Michael Kors

Michael Kors revved up his packed show audience with an audacious, early morning colour punch of traffic cone orange, hot saffron yellow and electric blue. The handfuls of show-stopping shades were made all the more obvious by their contrast against a canvas of deep black cashmere or wool felt. Kors kept the cutting simple but sexy, tracing slim pencil skirts with zip slits and replacing the suit jacket with a zip-front short-sleeved tunic. The fun quotient in this collection peaked right around the parade of camouflage-printed mink jackets and belted stoles, but the finale of peplum-heavy dresses with cascading trains - especially the zingy sparkling number worn by Karlie Kloss - was all about the serious business of the red carpet.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Michael Kors

Michael Kors revved up his packed show audience with an audacious, early morning colour punch of traffic cone orange, hot saffron yellow and electric blue. The handfuls of show-stopping shades were made all the more obvious by their contrast against a canvas of deep black cashmere or wool felt. Kors kept the cutting simple but sexy, tracing slim pencil skirts with zip slits and replacing the suit jacket with a zip-front short-sleeved tunic. The fun quotient in this collection peaked right around the parade of camouflage-printed mink jackets and belted stoles, but the finale of peplum-heavy dresses with cascading trains - especially the zingy sparkling number worn by Karlie Kloss - was all about the serious business of the red carpet.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Michael Kors

Michael Kors revved up his packed show audience with an audacious, early morning colour punch of traffic cone orange, hot saffron yellow and electric blue. The handfuls of show-stopping shades were made all the more obvious by their contrast against a canvas of deep black cashmere or wool felt. Kors kept the cutting simple but sexy, tracing slim pencil skirts with zip slits and replacing the suit jacket with a zip-front short-sleeved tunic. The fun quotient in this collection peaked right around the parade of camouflage-printed mink jackets and belted stoles, but the finale of peplum-heavy dresses with cascading trains - especially the zingy sparkling number worn by Karlie Kloss - was all about the serious business of the red carpet.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Michael Kors

Michael Kors revved up his packed show audience with an audacious, early morning colour punch of traffic cone orange, hot saffron yellow and electric blue. The handfuls of show-stopping shades were made all the more obvious by their contrast against a canvas of deep black cashmere or wool felt. Kors kept the cutting simple but sexy, tracing slim pencil skirts with zip slits and replacing the suit jacket with a zip-front short-sleeved tunic. The fun quotient in this collection peaked right around the parade of camouflage-printed mink jackets and belted stoles, but the finale of peplum-heavy dresses with cascading trains - especially the zingy sparkling number worn by Karlie Kloss - was all about the serious business of the red carpet.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Michael Kors

Michael Kors revved up his packed show audience with an audacious, early morning colour punch of traffic cone orange, hot saffron yellow and electric blue. The handfuls of show-stopping shades were made all the more obvious by their contrast against a canvas of deep black cashmere or wool felt. Kors kept the cutting simple but sexy, tracing slim pencil skirts with zip slits and replacing the suit jacket with a zip-front short-sleeved tunic. The fun quotient in this collection peaked right around the parade of camouflage-printed mink jackets and belted stoles, but the finale of peplum-heavy dresses with cascading trains - especially the zingy sparkling number worn by Karlie Kloss - was all about the serious business of the red carpet.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Reed Krakoff

Thanks to Reed Krakoff, the colour navy blue can never be considered boring again. For his clean Fall outing, the NY-based designer manipulated the dark blue tone in an unthinkably wide array of shades, expanding it from a subtle understatement to brilliant, exuberant shine. Despite the predominantly one-note colour story - there were explorations into glowing white and soft grey territory -  Krakoff's playground unfolded in an appealingly grand way.  Mostly this was thanks to the exceptionally luxurious materials, like smooth leathers, matte cashmeres, glossy pony skins and glowing python prints that he cut into modern, unfussy lines. The look was finished off with over-the-knee crocodile boots with white soles and sensible block heels for trampling through the mucky city streets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Reed Krakoff

Thanks to Reed Krakoff, the colour navy blue can never be considered boring again. For his clean Fall outing, the NY-based designer manipulated the dark blue tone in an unthinkably wide array of shades, expanding it from a subtle understatement to brilliant, exuberant shine. Despite the predominantly one-note colour story - there were explorations into glowing white and soft grey territory -  Krakoff's playground unfolded in an appealingly grand way.  Mostly this was thanks to the exceptionally luxurious materials, like smooth leathers, matte cashmeres, glossy pony skins and glowing python prints that he cut into modern, unfussy lines. The look was finished off with over-the-knee crocodile boots with white soles and sensible block heels for trampling through the mucky city streets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Reed Krakoff

Thanks to Reed Krakoff, the colour navy blue can never be considered boring again. For his clean Fall outing, the NY-based designer manipulated the dark blue tone in an unthinkably wide array of shades, expanding it from a subtle understatement to brilliant, exuberant shine. Despite the predominantly one-note colour story - there were explorations into glowing white and soft grey territory -  Krakoff's playground unfolded in an appealingly grand way.  Mostly this was thanks to the exceptionally luxurious materials, like smooth leathers, matte cashmeres, glossy pony skins and glowing python prints that he cut into modern, unfussy lines. The look was finished off with over-the-knee crocodile boots with white soles and sensible block heels for trampling through the mucky city streets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Reed Krakoff

Thanks to Reed Krakoff, the colour navy blue can never be considered boring again. For his clean Fall outing, the NY-based designer manipulated the dark blue tone in an unthinkably wide array of shades, expanding it from a subtle understatement to brilliant, exuberant shine. Despite the predominantly one-note colour story - there were explorations into glowing white and soft grey territory -  Krakoff's playground unfolded in an appealingly grand way.  Mostly this was thanks to the exceptionally luxurious materials, like smooth leathers, matte cashmeres, glossy pony skins and glowing python prints that he cut into modern, unfussy lines. The look was finished off with over-the-knee crocodile boots with white soles and sensible block heels for trampling through the mucky city streets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Reed Krakoff

Thanks to Reed Krakoff, the colour navy blue can never be considered boring again. For his clean Fall outing, the NY-based designer manipulated the dark blue tone in an unthinkably wide array of shades, expanding it from a subtle understatement to brilliant, exuberant shine. Despite the predominantly one-note colour story - there were explorations into glowing white and soft grey territory -  Krakoff's playground unfolded in an appealingly grand way.  Mostly this was thanks to the exceptionally luxurious materials, like smooth leathers, matte cashmeres, glossy pony skins and glowing python prints that he cut into modern, unfussy lines. The look was finished off with over-the-knee crocodile boots with white soles and sensible block heels for trampling through the mucky city streets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Proenza Schouler

An exceptional outing by design duo Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez proved why Proenza Schouler gives New York fashion its real relevance. Rather than re-hash and re-propose last season’s designs from Europe, McCollough and Hernandez are trailblazing their own path, uniting uptown polish with a raw, downtown verve. The mood this season was clean and sophisticatedly sober, moving away from obvious craft-work into something that is just as researched, but much more polished. A sharp two-piece ostrich skin skirt suit, for example, came in bright white and dove grey, and was cut in a boxy and slightly asymmetrical way. Just as chic were the pony skin jackets and A-line skirts printed with graphic black and white pixilation, or the stencil-cut perforated and chainmail dresses, both of which are truly new and welcome plays on surface decoration.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Proenza Schouler

An exceptional outing by design duo Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez proved why Proenza Schouler gives New York fashion its real relevance. Rather than re-hash and re-propose last season’s designs from Europe, McCollough and Hernandez are trailblazing their own path, uniting uptown polish with a raw, downtown verve. The mood this season was clean and sophisticatedly sober, moving away from obvious craft-work into something that is just as researched, but much more polished. A sharp two-piece ostrich skin skirt suit, for example, came in bright white and dove grey, and was cut in a boxy and slightly asymmetrical way. Just as chic were the pony skin jackets and A-line skirts printed with graphic black and white pixilation, or the stencil-cut perforated and chainmail dresses, both of which are truly new and welcome plays on surface decoration.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Proenza Schouler

An exceptional outing by design duo Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez proved why Proenza Schouler gives New York fashion its real relevance. Rather than re-hash and re-propose last season’s designs from Europe, McCollough and Hernandez are trailblazing their own path, uniting uptown polish with a raw, downtown verve. The mood this season was clean and sophisticatedly sober, moving away from obvious craft-work into something that is just as researched, but much more polished. A sharp two-piece ostrich skin skirt suit, for example, came in bright white and dove grey, and was cut in a boxy and slightly asymmetrical way. Just as chic were the pony skin jackets and A-line skirts printed with graphic black and white pixilation, or the stencil-cut perforated and chainmail dresses, both of which are truly new and welcome plays on surface decoration.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Proenza Schouler

An exceptional outing by design duo Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez proved why Proenza Schouler gives New York fashion its real relevance. Rather than re-hash and re-propose last season’s designs from Europe, McCollough and Hernandez are trailblazing their own path, uniting uptown polish with a raw, downtown verve. The mood this season was clean and sophisticatedly sober, moving away from obvious craft-work into something that is just as researched, but much more polished. A sharp two-piece ostrich skin skirt suit, for example, came in bright white and dove grey, and was cut in a boxy and slightly asymmetrical way. Just as chic were the pony skin jackets and A-line skirts printed with graphic black and white pixilation, or the stencil-cut perforated and chainmail dresses, both of which are truly new and welcome plays on surface decoration.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Proenza Schouler

An exceptional outing by design duo Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez proved why Proenza Schouler gives New York fashion its real relevance. Rather than re-hash and re-propose last season’s designs from Europe, McCollough and Hernandez are trailblazing their own path, uniting uptown polish with a raw, downtown verve. The mood this season was clean and sophisticatedly sober, moving away from obvious craft-work into something that is just as researched, but much more polished. A sharp two-piece ostrich skin skirt suit, for example, came in bright white and dove grey, and was cut in a boxy and slightly asymmetrical way. Just as chic were the pony skin jackets and A-line skirts printed with graphic black and white pixilation, or the stencil-cut perforated and chainmail dresses, both of which are truly new and welcome plays on surface decoration.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ralph Lauren

One of the top shoes we've seen on the New York runways appeared at the Ralph Lauren show: an over the knee black leather boot with a sturdy, stacked heel and perfectly carved toe that was neither round nor pointed, but rather in a happy spot right between. It hit the bullseye in terms of unbelievably wearable fashion and also set the gauge for Lauren's regimentally-inclined collection this season. Skintight sailor trousers, braid-trim navy hats, and close fitting velvet officer jackets were just a few of the many straight-shooting military touches on show, but the overall takeaway from Lauren's fashion message had nothing androgynous or masculine about it. On the contrary, his girls - whether they were flouncing along in long-sleeved dresses, full skirts in jewel-toned velvets, or ruffle-front shirts with floppy neck bows set off by the flash of high-wattage chandelier earrings - were full on female. For evening, the high drama was as straightforwardly seductive - think Anna Karenina sashaying around in her jewels, exploding ball gown and head topped with a mink turban.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ralph Lauren

One of the top shoes we've seen on the New York runways appeared at the Ralph Lauren show: an over the knee black leather boot with a sturdy, stacked heel and perfectly carved toe that was neither round nor pointed, but rather in a happy spot right between. It hit the bullseye in terms of unbelievably wearable fashion and also set the gauge for Lauren's regimentally-inclined collection this season. Skintight sailor trousers, braid-trim navy hats, and close fitting velvet officer jackets were just a few of the many straight-shooting military touches on show, but the overall takeaway from Lauren's fashion message had nothing androgynous or masculine about it. On the contrary, his girls - whether they were flouncing along in long-sleeved dresses, full skirts in jewel-toned velvets, or ruffle-front shirts with floppy neck bows set off by the flash of high-wattage chandelier earrings - were full on female. For evening, the high drama was as straightforwardly seductive - think Anna Karenina sashaying around in her jewels, exploding ball gown and head topped with a mink turban.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ralph Lauren

One of the top shoes we've seen on the New York runways appeared at the Ralph Lauren show: an over the knee black leather boot with a sturdy, stacked heel and perfectly carved toe that was neither round nor pointed, but rather in a happy spot right between. It hit the bullseye in terms of unbelievably wearable fashion and also set the gauge for Lauren's regimentally-inclined collection this season. Skintight sailor trousers, braid-trim navy hats, and close fitting velvet officer jackets were just a few of the many straight-shooting military touches on show, but the overall takeaway from Lauren's fashion message had nothing androgynous or masculine about it. On the contrary, his girls - whether they were flouncing along in long-sleeved dresses, full skirts in jewel-toned velvets, or ruffle-front shirts with floppy neck bows set off by the flash of high-wattage chandelier earrings - were full on female. For evening, the high drama was as straightforwardly seductive - think Anna Karenina sashaying around in her jewels, exploding ball gown and head topped with a mink turban.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ralph Lauren

One of the top shoes we've seen on the New York runways appeared at the Ralph Lauren show: an over the knee black leather boot with a sturdy, stacked heel and perfectly carved toe that was neither round nor pointed, but rather in a happy spot right between. It hit the bullseye in terms of unbelievably wearable fashion and also set the gauge for Lauren's regimentally-inclined collection this season. Skintight sailor trousers, braid-trim navy hats, and close fitting velvet officer jackets were just a few of the many straight-shooting military touches on show, but the overall takeaway from Lauren's fashion message had nothing androgynous or masculine about it. On the contrary, his girls - whether they were flouncing along in long-sleeved dresses, full skirts in jewel-toned velvets, or ruffle-front shirts with floppy neck bows set off by the flash of high-wattage chandelier earrings - were full on female. For evening, the high drama was as straightforwardly seductive - think Anna Karenina sashaying around in her jewels, exploding ball gown and head topped with a mink turban.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ralph Lauren

One of the top shoes we've seen on the New York runways appeared at the Ralph Lauren show: an over the knee black leather boot with a sturdy, stacked heel and perfectly carved toe that was neither round nor pointed, but rather in a happy spot right between. It hit the bullseye in terms of unbelievably wearable fashion and also set the gauge for Lauren's regimentally-inclined collection this season. Skintight sailor trousers, braid-trim navy hats, and close fitting velvet officer jackets were just a few of the many straight-shooting military touches on show, but the overall takeaway from Lauren's fashion message had nothing androgynous or masculine about it. On the contrary, his girls - whether they were flouncing along in long-sleeved dresses, full skirts in jewel-toned velvets, or ruffle-front shirts with floppy neck bows set off by the flash of high-wattage chandelier earrings - were full on female. For evening, the high drama was as straightforwardly seductive - think Anna Karenina sashaying around in her jewels, exploding ball gown and head topped with a mink turban.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

Calvin Klein had the best model line-up of New York fashion week - a sophisticated crew of seasoned runway veterans who had the pleasant distinction of being out of adolescence. The womanly quality of these models' beautiful, timeless faces was a keen complement to Francisco Costa's clothing designs, which possessed a similar grown up gravitas. Costa paved a solid, structured path for Fall, embracing boxy coats and jackets in substantial alpacas or cashmeres that had an important weight to them. He lightened up his two-piece plaid skirt suits and full-skirted dresses by either punching graphic square voids into the fabrics, or by inserting large panels of glossy patent leather. Things got tricky at times with the oversized buckled straps and bandeau tops, but we swooned over the spotless beauty of a white astrakhan-front top and matching A-line skirt.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

Calvin Klein had the best model line-up of New York fashion week - a sophisticated crew of seasoned runway veterans who had the pleasant distinction of being out of adolescence. The womanly quality of these models' beautiful, timeless faces was a keen complement to Francisco Costa's clothing designs, which possessed a similar grown up gravitas. Costa paved a solid, structured path for Fall, embracing boxy coats and jackets in substantial alpacas or cashmeres that had an important weight to them. He lightened up his two-piece plaid skirt suits and full-skirted dresses by either punching graphic square voids into the fabrics, or by inserting large panels of glossy patent leather. Things got tricky at times with the oversized buckled straps and bandeau tops, but we swooned over the spotless beauty of a white astrakhan-front top and matching A-line skirt.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

Calvin Klein had the best model line-up of New York fashion week - a sophisticated crew of seasoned runway veterans who had the pleasant distinction of being out of adolescence. The womanly quality of these models' beautiful, timeless faces was a keen complement to Francisco Costa's clothing designs, which possessed a similar grown up gravitas. Costa paved a solid, structured path for Fall, embracing boxy coats and jackets in substantial alpacas or cashmeres that had an important weight to them. He lightened up his two-piece plaid skirt suits and full-skirted dresses by either punching graphic square voids into the fabrics, or by inserting large panels of glossy patent leather. Things got tricky at times with the oversized buckled straps and bandeau tops, but we swooned over the spotless beauty of a white astrakhan-front top and matching A-line skirt.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

Calvin Klein had the best model line-up of New York fashion week - a sophisticated crew of seasoned runway veterans who had the pleasant distinction of being out of adolescence. The womanly quality of these models' beautiful, timeless faces was a keen complement to Francisco Costa's clothing designs, which possessed a similar grown up gravitas. Costa paved a solid, structured path for Fall, embracing boxy coats and jackets in substantial alpacas or cashmeres that had an important weight to them. He lightened up his two-piece plaid skirt suits and full-skirted dresses by either punching graphic square voids into the fabrics, or by inserting large panels of glossy patent leather. Things got tricky at times with the oversized buckled straps and bandeau tops, but we swooned over the spotless beauty of a white astrakhan-front top and matching A-line skirt.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

Calvin Klein had the best model line-up of New York fashion week - a sophisticated crew of seasoned runway veterans who had the pleasant distinction of being out of adolescence. The womanly quality of these models' beautiful, timeless faces was a keen complement to Francisco Costa's clothing designs, which possessed a similar grown up gravitas. Costa paved a solid, structured path for Fall, embracing boxy coats and jackets in substantial alpacas or cashmeres that had an important weight to them. He lightened up his two-piece plaid skirt suits and full-skirted dresses by either punching graphic square voids into the fabrics, or by inserting large panels of glossy patent leather. Things got tricky at times with the oversized buckled straps and bandeau tops, but we swooned over the spotless beauty of a white astrakhan-front top and matching A-line skirt.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Marc Jacobs

Leave it to Marc Jacobs to close New York Fashion Week with a bang. Despite a dramatic last minute rescheduling due to blizzards leaving many an editor in a huff, the designer customarily did not disappoint. Staged at the Lexington Avenue Armoury, Jacob’s models took to the circular runway under a gigantic glowing orb, donning Joan Jett mullets and last night’s eye make-up. The amber lighting was inspired by Olafur Eliasson’s 'The Weather Project'which the designer caught at the Tate - and cast a nostalgic, sepia tone over the presentation. The collection was equally stunning - with lamé plaid pyjama blouses, snug knits, fur stoles and round-collared trapeze coats, embellished with sequins, that were ladylike, while possessing a cool, nonchalant attitude at the same time.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans, Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Marc Jacobs

Leave it to Marc Jacobs to close New York Fashion Week with a bang. Despite a dramatic last minute rescheduling due to blizzards leaving many an editor in a huff, the designer customarily did not disappoint. Staged at the Lexington Avenue Armoury, Jacob’s models took to the circular runway under a gigantic glowing orb, donning Joan Jett mullets and last night’s eye make-up. The amber lighting was inspired by Olafur Eliasson’s 'The Weather Project'which the designer caught at the Tate - and cast a nostalgic, sepia tone over the presentation. The collection was equally stunning - with lamé plaid pyjama blouses, snug knits, fur stoles and round-collared trapeze coats, embellished with sequins, that were ladylike, while possessing a cool, nonchalant attitude at the same time.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans, Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Marc Jacobs

Leave it to Marc Jacobs to close New York Fashion Week with a bang. Despite a dramatic last minute rescheduling due to blizzards leaving many an editor in a huff, the designer customarily did not disappoint. Staged at the Lexington Avenue Armoury, Jacob’s models took to the circular runway under a gigantic glowing orb, donning Joan Jett mullets and last night’s eye make-up. The amber lighting was inspired by Olafur Eliasson’s 'The Weather Project'which the designer caught at the Tate - and cast a nostalgic, sepia tone over the presentation. The collection was equally stunning - with lamé plaid pyjama blouses, snug knits, fur stoles and round-collared trapeze coats, embellished with sequins, that were ladylike, while possessing a cool, nonchalant attitude at the same time.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans, Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Marc Jacobs

Leave it to Marc Jacobs to close New York Fashion Week with a bang. Despite a dramatic last minute rescheduling due to blizzards leaving many an editor in a huff, the designer customarily did not disappoint. Staged at the Lexington Avenue Armoury, Jacob’s models took to the circular runway under a gigantic glowing orb, donning Joan Jett mullets and last night’s eye make-up. The amber lighting was inspired by Olafur Eliasson’s 'The Weather Project'which the designer caught at the Tate - and cast a nostalgic, sepia tone over the presentation. The collection was equally stunning - with lamé plaid pyjama blouses, snug knits, fur stoles and round-collared trapeze coats, embellished with sequins, that were ladylike, while possessing a cool, nonchalant attitude at the same time.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans, Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Marc Jacobs

Leave it to Marc Jacobs to close New York Fashion Week with a bang. Despite a dramatic last minute rescheduling due to blizzards leaving many an editor in a huff, the designer customarily did not disappoint. Staged at the Lexington Avenue Armoury, Jacob’s models took to the circular runway under a gigantic glowing orb, donning Joan Jett mullets and last night’s eye make-up. The amber lighting was inspired by Olafur Eliasson’s 'The Weather Project'which the designer caught at the Tate - and cast a nostalgic, sepia tone over the presentation. The collection was equally stunning - with lamé plaid pyjama blouses, snug knits, fur stoles and round-collared trapeze coats, embellished with sequins, that were ladylike, while possessing a cool, nonchalant attitude at the same time.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans, Words: Pei-Ru Keh

Edun

Edun, the ethical fashion label co-founded by US singer Bono and wife Ali Hewson, has come a long way since its inception in 2005. Under the stewardship of creative director Sharon Wauchob, the utopian label has surpassed its purpose of building trade relationships with Africa by turning out increasingly cohesive collections for him and her, year after year. For Fall, Wauchob gave a nod to the label’s rock and roll roots with silk tartan, liquid lamé and studded leather aplenty. Still, this was no time warp; pieces for both sexes, like black blouses with delicate chain detailing and skinny knitted sweaters, boasted seductive, languid silhouettes and lots of skin, thanks to necklines plunging down almost to the navel.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Pei-Ru Keh


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