Gucci

A strong scent of couture has wafted off fashion runways of late, most recently in New York where we saw a sea of shoulders curved into the round shapes made famous in the haute couture ateliers of the 1960s. Frida Giannini also caught couture fever this season at Gucci, but ran the distance with it, cinching her models' waists into wasp-like proportions, slicing open dress neck holes in demure, horizontal slits, and cutting ladylike pencil skirts with matching trapeze jackets. If it all sounds like the sort of outfits a Hitchcockian Tippi Hedren would have worn, think again. Giannini coated her womanly silhouettes in a glaze of hot naughtiness. The prim tailleurs were worn with fierce python stiletto boots, 'bad girl' black leather gloves and paper-thin leather bodysuits that clung to the skin like black matte cling film. The best looks were in the first three-quarters of the show when Giannini brought a subversive edge to classically feminine shapes, while the evening line-up ran off on a somewhat awkward course. No matter:  a pencil-skirted, peplumed tailleur in glossy black python, a swing jacket and matching skirt in glossy astrakhan, and thread embroideries tracing the taut lines of trouser suits were all calibrated to perfection. The lady, it turns out, is a glorious tramp.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Gucci

A strong scent of couture has wafted off fashion runways of late, most recently in New York where we saw a sea of shoulders curved into the round shapes made famous in the haute couture ateliers of the 1960s. Frida Giannini also caught couture fever this season at Gucci, but ran the distance with it, cinching her models' waists into wasp-like proportions, slicing open dress neck holes in demure, horizontal slits, and cutting ladylike pencil skirts with matching trapeze jackets. If it all sounds like the sort of outfits a Hitchcockian Tippi Hedren would have worn, think again. Giannini coated her womanly silhouettes in a glaze of hot naughtiness. The prim tailleurs were worn with fierce python stiletto boots, 'bad girl' black leather gloves and paper-thin leather bodysuits that clung to the skin like black matte cling film. The best looks were in the first three-quarters of the show when Giannini brought a subversive edge to classically feminine shapes, while the evening line-up ran off on a somewhat awkward course. No matter:  a pencil-skirted, peplumed tailleur in glossy black python, a swing jacket and matching skirt in glossy astrakhan, and thread embroideries tracing the taut lines of trouser suits were all calibrated to perfection. The lady, it turns out, is a glorious tramp.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Gucci

A strong scent of couture has wafted off fashion runways of late, most recently in New York where we saw a sea of shoulders curved into the round shapes made famous in the haute couture ateliers of the 1960s. Frida Giannini also caught couture fever this season at Gucci, but ran the distance with it, cinching her models' waists into wasp-like proportions, slicing open dress neck holes in demure, horizontal slits, and cutting ladylike pencil skirts with matching trapeze jackets. If it all sounds like the sort of outfits a Hitchcockian Tippi Hedren would have worn, think again. Giannini coated her womanly silhouettes in a glaze of hot naughtiness. The prim tailleurs were worn with fierce python stiletto boots, 'bad girl' black leather gloves and paper-thin leather bodysuits that clung to the skin like black matte cling film. The best looks were in the first three-quarters of the show when Giannini brought a subversive edge to classically feminine shapes, while the evening line-up ran off on a somewhat awkward course. No matter:  a pencil-skirted, peplumed tailleur in glossy black python, a swing jacket and matching skirt in glossy astrakhan, and thread embroideries tracing the taut lines of trouser suits were all calibrated to perfection. The lady, it turns out, is a glorious tramp.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Gucci

A strong scent of couture has wafted off fashion runways of late, most recently in New York where we saw a sea of shoulders curved into the round shapes made famous in the haute couture ateliers of the 1960s. Frida Giannini also caught couture fever this season at Gucci, but ran the distance with it, cinching her models' waists into wasp-like proportions, slicing open dress neck holes in demure, horizontal slits, and cutting ladylike pencil skirts with matching trapeze jackets. If it all sounds like the sort of outfits a Hitchcockian Tippi Hedren would have worn, think again. Giannini coated her womanly silhouettes in a glaze of hot naughtiness. The prim tailleurs were worn with fierce python stiletto boots, 'bad girl' black leather gloves and paper-thin leather bodysuits that clung to the skin like black matte cling film. The best looks were in the first three-quarters of the show when Giannini brought a subversive edge to classically feminine shapes, while the evening line-up ran off on a somewhat awkward course. No matter:  a pencil-skirted, peplumed tailleur in glossy black python, a swing jacket and matching skirt in glossy astrakhan, and thread embroideries tracing the taut lines of trouser suits were all calibrated to perfection. The lady, it turns out, is a glorious tramp.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Gucci

A strong scent of couture has wafted off fashion runways of late, most recently in New York where we saw a sea of shoulders curved into the round shapes made famous in the haute couture ateliers of the 1960s. Frida Giannini also caught couture fever this season at Gucci, but ran the distance with it, cinching her models' waists into wasp-like proportions, slicing open dress neck holes in demure, horizontal slits, and cutting ladylike pencil skirts with matching trapeze jackets. If it all sounds like the sort of outfits a Hitchcockian Tippi Hedren would have worn, think again. Giannini coated her womanly silhouettes in a glaze of hot naughtiness. The prim tailleurs were worn with fierce python stiletto boots, 'bad girl' black leather gloves and paper-thin leather bodysuits that clung to the skin like black matte cling film. The best looks were in the first three-quarters of the show when Giannini brought a subversive edge to classically feminine shapes, while the evening line-up ran off on a somewhat awkward course. No matter:  a pencil-skirted, peplumed tailleur in glossy black python, a swing jacket and matching skirt in glossy astrakhan, and thread embroideries tracing the taut lines of trouser suits were all calibrated to perfection. The lady, it turns out, is a glorious tramp.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

No. 21

Alessandro dell'Acqua's No. 21 does so much that so few Milan fashion labels can manage. He's remained a niche, small and (relative to his blockbuster Milan counterparts), still unknown brand. At the same time, he dishes out of-the-moment fashion clothes that have a careful detailing and wearable ease. For Fall 2013, dell'Acqua caught the couture breeze, appropriating inflated silhouettes for his trapeze-style tops and copious amounts of shimmering crystal embroidery that covered pencil skirts, airy blouses and even basic socks. But the glamour was toned down to such an extent that most of the models looked like they had pilfered half of their outfits from their boyfriend's closets. Penny loafers, camel hair coats, mannish overcoats, fuzzy tartan wools, and schoolboy collared white shirts all cut through the cuteness, but still allowed these Numero Ventuno girls to emit an irresistible charm.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

No. 21

Alessandro dell'Acqua's No. 21 does so much that so few Milan fashion labels can manage. He's remained a niche, small and (relative to his blockbuster Milan counterparts), still unknown brand. At the same time, he dishes out of-the-moment fashion clothes that have a careful detailing and wearable ease. For Fall 2013, dell'Acqua caught the couture breeze, appropriating inflated silhouettes for his trapeze-style tops and copious amounts of shimmering crystal embroidery that covered pencil skirts, airy blouses and even basic socks. But the glamour was toned down to such an extent that most of the models looked like they had pilfered half of their outfits from their boyfriend's closets. Penny loafers, camel hair coats, mannish overcoats, fuzzy tartan wools, and schoolboy collared white shirts all cut through the cuteness, but still allowed these Numero Ventuno girls to emit an irresistible charm.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

No. 21

Alessandro dell'Acqua's No. 21 does so much that so few Milan fashion labels can manage. He's remained a niche, small and (relative to his blockbuster Milan counterparts), still unknown brand. At the same time, he dishes out of-the-moment fashion clothes that have a careful detailing and wearable ease. For Fall 2013, dell'Acqua caught the couture breeze, appropriating inflated silhouettes for his trapeze-style tops and copious amounts of shimmering crystal embroidery that covered pencil skirts, airy blouses and even basic socks. But the glamour was toned down to such an extent that most of the models looked like they had pilfered half of their outfits from their boyfriend's closets. Penny loafers, camel hair coats, mannish overcoats, fuzzy tartan wools, and schoolboy collared white shirts all cut through the cuteness, but still allowed these Numero Ventuno girls to emit an irresistible charm.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

No. 21

Alessandro dell'Acqua's No. 21 does so much that so few Milan fashion labels can manage. He's remained a niche, small and (relative to his blockbuster Milan counterparts), still unknown brand. At the same time, he dishes out of-the-moment fashion clothes that have a careful detailing and wearable ease. For Fall 2013, dell'Acqua caught the couture breeze, appropriating inflated silhouettes for his trapeze-style tops and copious amounts of shimmering crystal embroidery that covered pencil skirts, airy blouses and even basic socks. But the glamour was toned down to such an extent that most of the models looked like they had pilfered half of their outfits from their boyfriend's closets. Penny loafers, camel hair coats, mannish overcoats, fuzzy tartan wools, and schoolboy collared white shirts all cut through the cuteness, but still allowed these Numero Ventuno girls to emit an irresistible charm.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

No. 21

Alessandro dell'Acqua's No. 21 does so much that so few Milan fashion labels can manage. He's remained a niche, small and (relative to his blockbuster Milan counterparts), still unknown brand. At the same time, he dishes out of-the-moment fashion clothes that have a careful detailing and wearable ease. For Fall 2013, dell'Acqua caught the couture breeze, appropriating inflated silhouettes for his trapeze-style tops and copious amounts of shimmering crystal embroidery that covered pencil skirts, airy blouses and even basic socks. But the glamour was toned down to such an extent that most of the models looked like they had pilfered half of their outfits from their boyfriend's closets. Penny loafers, camel hair coats, mannish overcoats, fuzzy tartan wools, and schoolboy collared white shirts all cut through the cuteness, but still allowed these Numero Ventuno girls to emit an irresistible charm.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Max Mara

No one cuts a better camel hair coat than Max Mara. For Fall, the Italian brand steered clear of any fancy-pants runway distractions, and instead burrowed themselves deeply and single-mindedly into the serious business of that gold-lined DNA. The results - incredibly spun alpaca, camel and cashmere outwear paired with practical, easy sportswear pieces - presented a razor-sharp and convincing focus for Fall. The results powerfully chic, washed in newness thanks to the mammoth, mountainous piles of camel hair and camel-coloured cashmere that opened the show, swathing the models in new balloon volumes and quadruple layers of luxury. The exceptional overcoats - boxy, oversized and patched with furry alpaca - made a polished counterpoint to the cashmere sweat pants and suede patch trainers destined for a girl on the run.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Max Mara

No one cuts a better camel hair coat than Max Mara. For Fall, the Italian brand steered clear of any fancy-pants runway distractions, and instead burrowed themselves deeply and single-mindedly into the serious business of that gold-lined DNA. The results - incredibly spun alpaca, camel and cashmere outwear paired with practical, easy sportswear pieces - presented a razor-sharp and convincing focus for Fall. The results powerfully chic, washed in newness thanks to the mammoth, mountainous piles of camel hair and camel-coloured cashmere that opened the show, swathing the models in new balloon volumes and quadruple layers of luxury. The exceptional overcoats - boxy, oversized and patched with furry alpaca - made a polished counterpoint to the cashmere sweat pants and suede patch trainers destined for a girl on the run.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Max Mara

No one cuts a better camel hair coat than Max Mara. For Fall, the Italian brand steered clear of any fancy-pants runway distractions, and instead burrowed themselves deeply and single-mindedly into the serious business of that gold-lined DNA. The results - incredibly spun alpaca, camel and cashmere outwear paired with practical, easy sportswear pieces - presented a razor-sharp and convincing focus for Fall. The results powerfully chic, washed in newness thanks to the mammoth, mountainous piles of camel hair and camel-coloured cashmere that opened the show, swathing the models in new balloon volumes and quadruple layers of luxury. The exceptional overcoats - boxy, oversized and patched with furry alpaca - made a polished counterpoint to the cashmere sweat pants and suede patch trainers destined for a girl on the run.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Max Mara

No one cuts a better camel hair coat than Max Mara. For Fall, the Italian brand steered clear of any fancy-pants runway distractions, and instead burrowed themselves deeply and single-mindedly into the serious business of that gold-lined DNA. The results - incredibly spun alpaca, camel and cashmere outwear paired with practical, easy sportswear pieces - presented a razor-sharp and convincing focus for Fall. The results powerfully chic, washed in newness thanks to the mammoth, mountainous piles of camel hair and camel-coloured cashmere that opened the show, swathing the models in new balloon volumes and quadruple layers of luxury. The exceptional overcoats - boxy, oversized and patched with furry alpaca - made a polished counterpoint to the cashmere sweat pants and suede patch trainers destined for a girl on the run.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Max Mara

No one cuts a better camel hair coat than Max Mara. For Fall, the Italian brand steered clear of any fancy-pants runway distractions, and instead burrowed themselves deeply and single-mindedly into the serious business of that gold-lined DNA. The results - incredibly spun alpaca, camel and cashmere outwear paired with practical, easy sportswear pieces - presented a razor-sharp and convincing focus for Fall. The results powerfully chic, washed in newness thanks to the mammoth, mountainous piles of camel hair and camel-coloured cashmere that opened the show, swathing the models in new balloon volumes and quadruple layers of luxury. The exceptional overcoats - boxy, oversized and patched with furry alpaca - made a polished counterpoint to the cashmere sweat pants and suede patch trainers destined for a girl on the run.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Fendi

Springing from models' heads and disappearing into long spiny braids, silver streaked fox mowhawks set the stage for a primal yet futuristic Fendi show. Though the creations up above looked like slithering reptilian tails and were topped off with fuzzy fur trimmed eyewear, down below, creative director Karl Lagerfeld boxed bodies into modern cages of graphic, blocked, line-treated fur. Both top and tail, it turns out, where equally as captivating. In a Fall/Winter collection, it's hard for Fendi not to show off the technical excellence of its fur making capabilities, but this outing was particularly mind-blowing. Fine lines of colour that appeared stencilled over or cut into fur bases, for example, created a 3D trompe l'oeil effect on faux-pleat skirts or on streaky car coats, while different plays on fur length created pattern in the pile height. The accessories, thanks to family scion Silvia Fendi, continue to out-do themselves. We could spend all of next winter wearing color-blocked or multi-stripe handbags made from pure mink, or curve-edge booties tufted in silky fox.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Fendi

Springing from models' heads and disappearing into long spiny braids, silver streaked fox mowhawks set the stage for a primal yet futuristic Fendi show. Though the creations up above looked like slithering reptilian tails and were topped off with fuzzy fur trimmed eyewear, down below, creative director Karl Lagerfeld boxed bodies into modern cages of graphic, blocked, line-treated fur. Both top and tail, it turns out, where equally as captivating. In a Fall/Winter collection, it's hard for Fendi not to show off the technical excellence of its fur making capabilities, but this outing was particularly mind-blowing. Fine lines of colour that appeared stencilled over or cut into fur bases, for example, created a 3D trompe l'oeil effect on faux-pleat skirts or on streaky car coats, while different plays on fur length created pattern in the pile height. The accessories, thanks to family scion Silvia Fendi, continue to out-do themselves. We could spend all of next winter wearing color-blocked or multi-stripe handbags made from pure mink, or curve-edge booties tufted in silky fox.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Fendi

Springing from models' heads and disappearing into long spiny braids, silver streaked fox mowhawks set the stage for a primal yet futuristic Fendi show. Though the creations up above looked like slithering reptilian tails and were topped off with fuzzy fur trimmed eyewear, down below, creative director Karl Lagerfeld boxed bodies into modern cages of graphic, blocked, line-treated fur. Both top and tail, it turns out, where equally as captivating. In a Fall/Winter collection, it's hard for Fendi not to show off the technical excellence of its fur making capabilities, but this outing was particularly mind-blowing. Fine lines of colour that appeared stencilled over or cut into fur bases, for example, created a 3D trompe l'oeil effect on faux-pleat skirts or on streaky car coats, while different plays on fur length created pattern in the pile height. The accessories, thanks to family scion Silvia Fendi, continue to out-do themselves. We could spend all of next winter wearing color-blocked or multi-stripe handbags made from pure mink, or curve-edge booties tufted in silky fox.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Fendi

Springing from models' heads and disappearing into long spiny braids, silver streaked fox mowhawks set the stage for a primal yet futuristic Fendi show. Though the creations up above looked like slithering reptilian tails and were topped off with fuzzy fur trimmed eyewear, down below, creative director Karl Lagerfeld boxed bodies into modern cages of graphic, blocked, line-treated fur. Both top and tail, it turns out, where equally as captivating. In a Fall/Winter collection, it's hard for Fendi not to show off the technical excellence of its fur making capabilities, but this outing was particularly mind-blowing. Fine lines of colour that appeared stencilled over or cut into fur bases, for example, created a 3D trompe l'oeil effect on faux-pleat skirts or on streaky car coats, while different plays on fur length created pattern in the pile height. The accessories, thanks to family scion Silvia Fendi, continue to out-do themselves. We could spend all of next winter wearing color-blocked or multi-stripe handbags made from pure mink, or curve-edge booties tufted in silky fox.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Fendi

Springing from models' heads and disappearing into long spiny braids, silver streaked fox mowhawks set the stage for a primal yet futuristic Fendi show. Though the creations up above looked like slithering reptilian tails and were topped off with fuzzy fur trimmed eyewear, down below, creative director Karl Lagerfeld boxed bodies into modern cages of graphic, blocked, line-treated fur. Both top and tail, it turns out, where equally as captivating. In a Fall/Winter collection, it's hard for Fendi not to show off the technical excellence of its fur making capabilities, but this outing was particularly mind-blowing. Fine lines of colour that appeared stencilled over or cut into fur bases, for example, created a 3D trompe l'oeil effect on faux-pleat skirts or on streaky car coats, while different plays on fur length created pattern in the pile height. The accessories, thanks to family scion Silvia Fendi, continue to out-do themselves. We could spend all of next winter wearing color-blocked or multi-stripe handbags made from pure mink, or curve-edge booties tufted in silky fox.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Antonio Marras

It is positively head-scratching that Milan-based fashion designer Antonio Marras is not better known on a global scale. With his most recent Fall collection, the former Kenzo designer proved just how magnetic his creative vision of fashion can be. Using the ripe floral motifs and luxury exotica that have been signatures of his work well over the last decade, Marras stitched together original canvases of intricately collaged fabrics. There was a strong, effective play between boy and girl in these designs, as Harris tweeds, herringbones, pinstripes and thick wools were patched together with heavy, floral-printed silks and utterly feminine jacquards. The silhouettes, meanwhile, were taken right out of a 1950s couture salon - nipped waists and yards of full skirts. Marras made a gorgeous play on nearly every fabric he touched, even the outdoorsy deer skin that became as subtle as satin on the front of a two piece tailleur. Yum.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Antonio Marras

It is positively head-scratching that Milan-based fashion designer Antonio Marras is not better known on a global scale. With his most recent Fall collection, the former Kenzo designer proved just how magnetic his creative vision of fashion can be. Using the ripe floral motifs and luxury exotica that have been signatures of his work well over the last decade, Marras stitched together original canvases of intricately collaged fabrics. There was a strong, effective play between boy and girl in these designs, as Harris tweeds, herringbones, pinstripes and thick wools were patched together with heavy, floral-printed silks and utterly feminine jacquards. The silhouettes, meanwhile, were taken right out of a 1950s couture salon - nipped waists and yards of full skirts. Marras made a gorgeous play on nearly every fabric he touched, even the outdoorsy deer skin that became as subtle as satin on the front of a two piece tailleur. Yum.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Antonio Marras

It is positively head-scratching that Milan-based fashion designer Antonio Marras is not better known on a global scale. With his most recent Fall collection, the former Kenzo designer proved just how magnetic his creative vision of fashion can be. Using the ripe floral motifs and luxury exotica that have been signatures of his work well over the last decade, Marras stitched together original canvases of intricately collaged fabrics. There was a strong, effective play between boy and girl in these designs, as Harris tweeds, herringbones, pinstripes and thick wools were patched together with heavy, floral-printed silks and utterly feminine jacquards. The silhouettes, meanwhile, were taken right out of a 1950s couture salon - nipped waists and yards of full skirts. Marras made a gorgeous play on nearly every fabric he touched, even the outdoorsy deer skin that became as subtle as satin on the front of a two piece tailleur. Yum.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Antonio Marras

It is positively head-scratching that Milan-based fashion designer Antonio Marras is not better known on a global scale. With his most recent Fall collection, the former Kenzo designer proved just how magnetic his creative vision of fashion can be. Using the ripe floral motifs and luxury exotica that have been signatures of his work well over the last decade, Marras stitched together original canvases of intricately collaged fabrics. There was a strong, effective play between boy and girl in these designs, as Harris tweeds, herringbones, pinstripes and thick wools were patched together with heavy, floral-printed silks and utterly feminine jacquards. The silhouettes, meanwhile, were taken right out of a 1950s couture salon - nipped waists and yards of full skirts. Marras made a gorgeous play on nearly every fabric he touched, even the outdoorsy deer skin that became as subtle as satin on the front of a two piece tailleur. Yum.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Antonio Marras

It is positively head-scratching that Milan-based fashion designer Antonio Marras is not better known on a global scale. With his most recent Fall collection, the former Kenzo designer proved just how magnetic his creative vision of fashion can be. Using the ripe floral motifs and luxury exotica that have been signatures of his work well over the last decade, Marras stitched together original canvases of intricately collaged fabrics. There was a strong, effective play between boy and girl in these designs, as Harris tweeds, herringbones, pinstripes and thick wools were patched together with heavy, floral-printed silks and utterly feminine jacquards. The silhouettes, meanwhile, were taken right out of a 1950s couture salon - nipped waists and yards of full skirts. Marras made a gorgeous play on nearly every fabric he touched, even the outdoorsy deer skin that became as subtle as satin on the front of a two piece tailleur. Yum.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

The fine line between the finessed lady and her more disturbing and deranged alter ego emerged on the Prada woman's Fall runway. On the one hand, Miuccia Prada delivered a laundry list for every well-to-do, mid-century homemaker: two-piece skirt suits cut in early 1950s New Look proportions, snug cropped jackets with cinched waists and full skirts that cascaded in elegant flounces to mid calf.  But things came unhinged from their pristine roots almost immediately, turning Prada's feminine vision into a 1950s suburban housewife's nightmare. The necklines of prim dresses were slashed as if they'd been torn open in a lover's tryst, the hems of skirts were pulled askance into mis-matched lines, while the models' hair hung in glum, oily pools of disarray. Cuffs, a long time feature of a well-polished woman's wardrobe, ballooned into cartoonish proportions in wool felt or streaky sable creating a new erogenous zone on the wrist, while the feet slid into monster lug-soled Men's work boots - a subversive version of the 1940s footwear shapes that had minor (in comparison) lug soles. Femininity is back in fashion, but it doesn't mean that anyone has to swallow it with a squeaky clean, silver spoon. Prada continues to push the boundaries of what female attractiveness actually means.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

The fine line between the finessed lady and her more disturbing and deranged alter ego emerged on the Prada woman's Fall runway. On the one hand, Miuccia Prada delivered a laundry list for every well-to-do, mid-century homemaker: two-piece skirt suits cut in early 1950s New Look proportions, snug cropped jackets with cinched waists and full skirts that cascaded in elegant flounces to mid calf.  But things came unhinged from their pristine roots almost immediately, turning Prada's feminine vision into a 1950s suburban housewife's nightmare. The necklines of prim dresses were slashed as if they'd been torn open in a lover's tryst, the hems of skirts were pulled askance into mis-matched lines, while the models' hair hung in glum, oily pools of disarray. Cuffs, a long time feature of a well-polished woman's wardrobe, ballooned into cartoonish proportions in wool felt or streaky sable creating a new erogenous zone on the wrist, while the feet slid into monster lug-soled Men's work boots - a subversive version of the 1940s footwear shapes that had minor (in comparison) lug soles. Femininity is back in fashion, but it doesn't mean that anyone has to swallow it with a squeaky clean, silver spoon. Prada continues to push the boundaries of what female attractiveness actually means.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

The fine line between the finessed lady and her more disturbing and deranged alter ego emerged on the Prada woman's Fall runway. On the one hand, Miuccia Prada delivered a laundry list for every well-to-do, mid-century homemaker: two-piece skirt suits cut in early 1950s New Look proportions, snug cropped jackets with cinched waists and full skirts that cascaded in elegant flounces to mid calf.  But things came unhinged from their pristine roots almost immediately, turning Prada's feminine vision into a 1950s suburban housewife's nightmare. The necklines of prim dresses were slashed as if they'd been torn open in a lover's tryst, the hems of skirts were pulled askance into mis-matched lines, while the models' hair hung in glum, oily pools of disarray. Cuffs, a long time feature of a well-polished woman's wardrobe, ballooned into cartoonish proportions in wool felt or streaky sable creating a new erogenous zone on the wrist, while the feet slid into monster lug-soled Men's work boots - a subversive version of the 1940s footwear shapes that had minor (in comparison) lug soles. Femininity is back in fashion, but it doesn't mean that anyone has to swallow it with a squeaky clean, silver spoon. Prada continues to push the boundaries of what female attractiveness actually means.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

The fine line between the finessed lady and her more disturbing and deranged alter ego emerged on the Prada woman's Fall runway. On the one hand, Miuccia Prada delivered a laundry list for every well-to-do, mid-century homemaker: two-piece skirt suits cut in early 1950s New Look proportions, snug cropped jackets with cinched waists and full skirts that cascaded in elegant flounces to mid calf.  But things came unhinged from their pristine roots almost immediately, turning Prada's feminine vision into a 1950s suburban housewife's nightmare. The necklines of prim dresses were slashed as if they'd been torn open in a lover's tryst, the hems of skirts were pulled askance into mis-matched lines, while the models' hair hung in glum, oily pools of disarray. Cuffs, a long time feature of a well-polished woman's wardrobe, ballooned into cartoonish proportions in wool felt or streaky sable creating a new erogenous zone on the wrist, while the feet slid into monster lug-soled Men's work boots - a subversive version of the 1940s footwear shapes that had minor (in comparison) lug soles. Femininity is back in fashion, but it doesn't mean that anyone has to swallow it with a squeaky clean, silver spoon. Prada continues to push the boundaries of what female attractiveness actually means.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

The fine line between the finessed lady and her more disturbing and deranged alter ego emerged on the Prada woman's Fall runway. On the one hand, Miuccia Prada delivered a laundry list for every well-to-do, mid-century homemaker: two-piece skirt suits cut in early 1950s New Look proportions, snug cropped jackets with cinched waists and full skirts that cascaded in elegant flounces to mid calf.  But things came unhinged from their pristine roots almost immediately, turning Prada's feminine vision into a 1950s suburban housewife's nightmare. The necklines of prim dresses were slashed as if they'd been torn open in a lover's tryst, the hems of skirts were pulled askance into mis-matched lines, while the models' hair hung in glum, oily pools of disarray. Cuffs, a long time feature of a well-polished woman's wardrobe, ballooned into cartoonish proportions in wool felt or streaky sable creating a new erogenous zone on the wrist, while the feet slid into monster lug-soled Men's work boots - a subversive version of the 1940s footwear shapes that had minor (in comparison) lug soles. Femininity is back in fashion, but it doesn't mean that anyone has to swallow it with a squeaky clean, silver spoon. Prada continues to push the boundaries of what female attractiveness actually means.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ports 1961

The voluminous, dramatically flared, below-the-knee skirt is shaping up to be the silhouette of the season. The first look out at Ports 1961 nailed it better than most, cut in a full-body version from a luxurious swath of smooth grey, felt cashmere. Despite their debutant roots, none of these full-skirted skirts looked traditional or, worse, boring. There's an arsenal of modern styling tricks at the Ports 1961 girl's fingertips, like the fuzzy, thick grey or camel over-the-knee socks worn with a flash of white leather pumps or metallic-coloured sandals. If a skirt doesn't suit, there's always the clean lines of cropped wide-leg trousers that look beautiful with tunic tops, or a column dress of pure ebony astrakhan. This label is shaping up to be one to watch.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ports 1961

The voluminous, dramatically flared, below-the-knee skirt is shaping up to be the silhouette of the season. The first look out at Ports 1961 nailed it better than most, cut in a full-body version from a luxurious swath of smooth grey, felt cashmere. Despite their debutant roots, none of these full-skirted skirts looked traditional or, worse, boring. There's an arsenal of modern styling tricks at the Ports 1961 girl's fingertips, like the fuzzy, thick grey or camel over-the-knee socks worn with a flash of white leather pumps or metallic-coloured sandals. If a skirt doesn't suit, there's always the clean lines of cropped wide-leg trousers that look beautiful with tunic tops, or a column dress of pure ebony astrakhan. This label is shaping up to be one to watch.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ports 1961

The voluminous, dramatically flared, below-the-knee skirt is shaping up to be the silhouette of the season. The first look out at Ports 1961 nailed it better than most, cut in a full-body version from a luxurious swath of smooth grey, felt cashmere. Despite their debutant roots, none of these full-skirted skirts looked traditional or, worse, boring. There's an arsenal of modern styling tricks at the Ports 1961 girl's fingertips, like the fuzzy, thick grey or camel over-the-knee socks worn with a flash of white leather pumps or metallic-coloured sandals. If a skirt doesn't suit, there's always the clean lines of cropped wide-leg trousers that look beautiful with tunic tops, or a column dress of pure ebony astrakhan. This label is shaping up to be one to watch.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ports 1961

The voluminous, dramatically flared, below-the-knee skirt is shaping up to be the silhouette of the season. The first look out at Ports 1961 nailed it better than most, cut in a full-body version from a luxurious swath of smooth grey, felt cashmere. Despite their debutant roots, none of these full-skirted skirts looked traditional or, worse, boring. There's an arsenal of modern styling tricks at the Ports 1961 girl's fingertips, like the fuzzy, thick grey or camel over-the-knee socks worn with a flash of white leather pumps or metallic-coloured sandals. If a skirt doesn't suit, there's always the clean lines of cropped wide-leg trousers that look beautiful with tunic tops, or a column dress of pure ebony astrakhan. This label is shaping up to be one to watch.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ports 1961

The voluminous, dramatically flared, below-the-knee skirt is shaping up to be the silhouette of the season. The first look out at Ports 1961 nailed it better than most, cut in a full-body version from a luxurious swath of smooth grey, felt cashmere. Despite their debutant roots, none of these full-skirted skirts looked traditional or, worse, boring. There's an arsenal of modern styling tricks at the Ports 1961 girl's fingertips, like the fuzzy, thick grey or camel over-the-knee socks worn with a flash of white leather pumps or metallic-coloured sandals. If a skirt doesn't suit, there's always the clean lines of cropped wide-leg trousers that look beautiful with tunic tops, or a column dress of pure ebony astrakhan. This label is shaping up to be one to watch.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Dsquared²

Dsquared²'s dame is in town, and she's bringing her finest jazz pants with her. Putting forth a melange of looks that wouldn't have been out of place in a smoky wartime jazz club, Dean and Dan Caten's troop of 'Dames-Masculines' channelled the silhouettes of the 1940s - think cinched ladylike pencil skirts, and rigidly tailored, wide-leg trousers with slouchy waists paired with silk camisoles. With the Caten brothers' partiality to a theme, the 'jazz club' set were accessorised with bow ties, furs, t-bar heels and cigarette holders. Most notable were the trouser suits, featuring smart double–breasted Napoli jackets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Dsquared²

Dsquared²'s dame is in town, and she's bringing her finest jazz pants with her. Putting forth a melange of looks that wouldn't have been out of place in a smoky wartime jazz club, Dean and Dan Caten's troop of 'Dames-Masculines' channelled the silhouettes of the 1940s - think cinched ladylike pencil skirts, and rigidly tailored, wide-leg trousers with slouchy waists paired with silk camisoles. With the Caten brothers' partiality to a theme, the 'jazz club' set were accessorised with bow ties, furs, t-bar heels and cigarette holders. Most notable were the trouser suits, featuring smart double–breasted Napoli jackets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

 

Dsquared²

Dsquared²'s dame is in town, and she's bringing her finest jazz pants with her. Putting forth a melange of looks that wouldn't have been out of place in a smoky wartime jazz club, Dean and Dan Caten's troop of 'Dames-Masculines' channelled the silhouettes of the 1940s - think cinched ladylike pencil skirts, and rigidly tailored, wide-leg trousers with slouchy waists paired with silk camisoles. With the Caten brothers' partiality to a theme, the 'jazz club' set were accessorised with bow ties, furs, t-bar heels and cigarette holders. Most notable were the trouser suits, featuring smart double–breasted Napoli jackets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

 

Dsquared²

Dsquared²'s dame is in town, and she's bringing her finest jazz pants with her. Putting forth a melange of looks that wouldn't have been out of place in a smoky wartime jazz club, Dean and Dan Caten's troop of 'Dames-Masculines' channelled the silhouettes of the 1940s - think cinched ladylike pencil skirts, and rigidly tailored, wide-leg trousers with slouchy waists paired with silk camisoles. With the Caten brothers' partiality to a theme, the 'jazz club' set were accessorised with bow ties, furs, t-bar heels and cigarette holders. Most notable were the trouser suits, featuring smart double–breasted Napoli jackets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

 

Dsquared²

Dsquared²'s dame is in town, and she's bringing her finest jazz pants with her. Putting forth a melange of looks that wouldn't have been out of place in a smoky wartime jazz club, Dean and Dan Caten's troop of 'Dames-Masculines' channelled the silhouettes of the 1940s - think cinched ladylike pencil skirts, and rigidly tailored, wide-leg trousers with slouchy waists paired with silk camisoles. With the Caten brothers' partiality to a theme, the 'jazz club' set were accessorised with bow ties, furs, t-bar heels and cigarette holders. Most notable were the trouser suits, featuring smart double–breasted Napoli jackets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

 

Sportmax

Sportmax zoomed out of the trendy, cluttered neighbourhood which it sometimes loiters in, landing instead in one of the most chic places in town. Swiping its palette almost entirely clean, the Italian label took on the theme of sportswear in a luxurious, haute way.  Simple, alluring shapes - like loosened trousers, pleated skirts, or round-necked sweaters - were created from captivating concoctions of rich cashmeres, fuzzy angoras and flat-pressed wools, all of which had a textured, tactile feel. The gamble that behemoth brand Max Mara took in bringing sophistication to its second line worked well: the clothes looked expensive, modern and utterly desirable.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Sportmax

Sportmax zoomed out of the trendy, cluttered neighbourhood which it sometimes loiters in, landing instead in one of the most chic places in town. Swiping its palette almost entirely clean, the Italian label took on the theme of sportswear in a luxurious, haute way.  Simple, alluring shapes - like loosened trousers, pleated skirts, or round-necked sweaters - were created from captivating concoctions of rich cashmeres, fuzzy angoras and flat-pressed wools, all of which had a textured, tactile feel. The gamble that behemoth brand Max Mara took in bringing sophistication to its second line worked well: the clothes looked expensive, modern and utterly desirable.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Sportmax

Sportmax zoomed out of the trendy, cluttered neighbourhood which it sometimes loiters in, landing instead in one of the most chic places in town. Swiping its palette almost entirely clean, the Italian label took on the theme of sportswear in a luxurious, haute way.  Simple, alluring shapes - like loosened trousers, pleated skirts, or round-necked sweaters - were created from captivating concoctions of rich cashmeres, fuzzy angoras and flat-pressed wools, all of which had a textured, tactile feel. The gamble that behemoth brand Max Mara took in bringing sophistication to its second line worked well: the clothes looked expensive, modern and utterly desirable.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Sportmax

Sportmax zoomed out of the trendy, cluttered neighbourhood which it sometimes loiters in, landing instead in one of the most chic places in town. Swiping its palette almost entirely clean, the Italian label took on the theme of sportswear in a luxurious, haute way.  Simple, alluring shapes - like loosened trousers, pleated skirts, or round-necked sweaters - were created from captivating concoctions of rich cashmeres, fuzzy angoras and flat-pressed wools, all of which had a textured, tactile feel. The gamble that behemoth brand Max Mara took in bringing sophistication to its second line worked well: the clothes looked expensive, modern and utterly desirable.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Sportmax

Sportmax zoomed out of the trendy, cluttered neighbourhood which it sometimes loiters in, landing instead in one of the most chic places in town. Swiping its palette almost entirely clean, the Italian label took on the theme of sportswear in a luxurious, haute way.  Simple, alluring shapes - like loosened trousers, pleated skirts, or round-necked sweaters - were created from captivating concoctions of rich cashmeres, fuzzy angoras and flat-pressed wools, all of which had a textured, tactile feel. The gamble that behemoth brand Max Mara took in bringing sophistication to its second line worked well: the clothes looked expensive, modern and utterly desirable.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Versace

Donatella Versace has been handling the racy roots of her Versace label like a Formula One driver, slamming her spiked heel down on the pedal without fear. This season, she hurtled along without down-shifting, stopping for no woman who wouldn't commit to black latex, yellow and black zebra mink coats, and skin tight dresses held together with dangerously giant nails. There was plenty of bare skin on display, with some of the pieces somewhat defying logic, such as a one-piece black latex bathing suit worn with sweeping black officer coat (our suggested outing: a winter rooftop pool party in Moscow?). But actually, Donatella's head this season was more in the punk era, as she piled t-shirts high with 1980s memorabilia, and collaged together shiny patent leather dresses with plaid kilt skirts, vertiginously slit and worn with studded boy boots with silver metal caps.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Versace

Donatella Versace has been handling the racy roots of her Versace label like a Formula One driver, slamming her spiked heel down on the pedal without fear. This season, she hurtled along without down-shifting, stopping for no woman who wouldn't commit to black latex, yellow and black zebra mink coats, and skin tight dresses held together with dangerously giant nails. There was plenty of bare skin on display, with some of the pieces somewhat defying logic, such as a one-piece black latex bathing suit worn with sweeping black officer coat (our suggested outing: a winter rooftop pool party in Moscow?). But actually, Donatella's head this season was more in the punk era, as she piled t-shirts high with 1980s memorabilia, and collaged together shiny patent leather dresses with plaid kilt skirts, vertiginously slit and worn with studded boy boots with silver metal caps.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Versace

Donatella Versace has been handling the racy roots of her Versace label like a Formula One driver, slamming her spiked heel down on the pedal without fear. This season, she hurtled along without down-shifting, stopping for no woman who wouldn't commit to black latex, yellow and black zebra mink coats, and skin tight dresses held together with dangerously giant nails. There was plenty of bare skin on display, with some of the pieces somewhat defying logic, such as a one-piece black latex bathing suit worn with sweeping black officer coat (our suggested outing: a winter rooftop pool party in Moscow?). But actually, Donatella's head this season was more in the punk era, as she piled t-shirts high with 1980s memorabilia, and collaged together shiny patent leather dresses with plaid kilt skirts, vertiginously slit and worn with studded boy boots with silver metal caps.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Versace

Donatella Versace has been handling the racy roots of her Versace label like a Formula One driver, slamming her spiked heel down on the pedal without fear. This season, she hurtled along without down-shifting, stopping for no woman who wouldn't commit to black latex, yellow and black zebra mink coats, and skin tight dresses held together with dangerously giant nails. There was plenty of bare skin on display, with some of the pieces somewhat defying logic, such as a one-piece black latex bathing suit worn with sweeping black officer coat (our suggested outing: a winter rooftop pool party in Moscow?). But actually, Donatella's head this season was more in the punk era, as she piled t-shirts high with 1980s memorabilia, and collaged together shiny patent leather dresses with plaid kilt skirts, vertiginously slit and worn with studded boy boots with silver metal caps.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Versace

Donatella Versace has been handling the racy roots of her Versace label like a Formula One driver, slamming her spiked heel down on the pedal without fear. This season, she hurtled along without down-shifting, stopping for no woman who wouldn't commit to black latex, yellow and black zebra mink coats, and skin tight dresses held together with dangerously giant nails. There was plenty of bare skin on display, with some of the pieces somewhat defying logic, such as a one-piece black latex bathing suit worn with sweeping black officer coat (our suggested outing: a winter rooftop pool party in Moscow?). But actually, Donatella's head this season was more in the punk era, as she piled t-shirts high with 1980s memorabilia, and collaged together shiny patent leather dresses with plaid kilt skirts, vertiginously slit and worn with studded boy boots with silver metal caps.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Bottega Veneta

Even the Bottega Veneta model's hair betrayed Tomas Maier's obsession this season, artfully teased as it was into fluffy piles of what looked like freshly washed lambswool. If there was any doubt as to the potential of wool fibres in high female fashion, Maier laid them all to rest in this strong Fall outing. Starting with light wool flannels and working up to denser, heavier weaves, Maier elevated the lowly sheep coat to the highest levels of luxury. The cuts began with accordion pleats on full skirts that frilled around the models' waists like a cupcake wrapper, before building towards petals of thinly sliced wool on jacket shoulders and body contouring dresses. Boiled wools gave a new, bumpy textured surface that toned down the elegance of the formal silhouettes. Most intriguing, however, was the way Maier manipulated wool felt as both a canvas and medium for art-like collages. The material was twisted, scratched, dyed and printed to create novel pattern on cocktail dresses, and later squashed up to look like black Astrakhan, patched together with glossy black satin. What a brilliant sheep-herder Tomas Maier turned out to be.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Bottega Veneta

Even the Bottega Veneta model's hair betrayed Tomas Maier's obsession this season, artfully teased as it was into fluffy piles of what looked like freshly washed lambswool. If there was any doubt as to the potential of wool fibres in high female fashion, Maier laid them all to rest in this strong Fall outing. Starting with light wool flannels and working up to denser, heavier weaves, Maier elevated the lowly sheep coat to the highest levels of luxury. The cuts began with accordion pleats on full skirts that frilled around the models' waists like a cupcake wrapper, before building towards petals of thinly sliced wool on jacket shoulders and body contouring dresses. Boiled wools gave a new, bumpy textured surface that toned down the elegance of the formal silhouettes. Most intriguing, however, was the way Maier manipulated wool felt as both a canvas and medium for art-like collages. The material was twisted, scratched, dyed and printed to create novel pattern on cocktail dresses, and later squashed up to look like black Astrakhan, patched together with glossy black satin. What a brilliant sheep-herder Tomas Maier turned out to be.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Bottega Veneta

Even the Bottega Veneta model's hair betrayed Tomas Maier's obsession this season, artfully teased as it was into fluffy piles of what looked like freshly washed lambswool. If there was any doubt as to the potential of wool fibres in high female fashion, Maier laid them all to rest in this strong Fall outing. Starting with light wool flannels and working up to denser, heavier weaves, Maier elevated the lowly sheep coat to the highest levels of luxury. The cuts began with accordion pleats on full skirts that frilled around the models' waists like a cupcake wrapper, before building towards petals of thinly sliced wool on jacket shoulders and body contouring dresses. Boiled wools gave a new, bumpy textured surface that toned down the elegance of the formal silhouettes. Most intriguing, however, was the way Maier manipulated wool felt as both a canvas and medium for art-like collages. The material was twisted, scratched, dyed and printed to create novel pattern on cocktail dresses, and later squashed up to look like black Astrakhan, patched together with glossy black satin. What a brilliant sheep-herder Tomas Maier turned out to be.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Bottega Veneta

Even the Bottega Veneta model's hair betrayed Tomas Maier's obsession this season, artfully teased as it was into fluffy piles of what looked like freshly washed lambswool. If there was any doubt as to the potential of wool fibres in high female fashion, Maier laid them all to rest in this strong Fall outing. Starting with light wool flannels and working up to denser, heavier weaves, Maier elevated the lowly sheep coat to the highest levels of luxury. The cuts began with accordion pleats on full skirts that frilled around the models' waists like a cupcake wrapper, before building towards petals of thinly sliced wool on jacket shoulders and body contouring dresses. Boiled wools gave a new, bumpy textured surface that toned down the elegance of the formal silhouettes. Most intriguing, however, was the way Maier manipulated wool felt as both a canvas and medium for art-like collages. The material was twisted, scratched, dyed and printed to create novel pattern on cocktail dresses, and later squashed up to look like black Astrakhan, patched together with glossy black satin. What a brilliant sheep-herder Tomas Maier turned out to be.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Bottega Veneta

Even the Bottega Veneta model's hair betrayed Tomas Maier's obsession this season, artfully teased as it was into fluffy piles of what looked like freshly washed lambswool. If there was any doubt as to the potential of wool fibres in high female fashion, Maier laid them all to rest in this strong Fall outing. Starting with light wool flannels and working up to denser, heavier weaves, Maier elevated the lowly sheep coat to the highest levels of luxury. The cuts began with accordion pleats on full skirts that frilled around the models' waists like a cupcake wrapper, before building towards petals of thinly sliced wool on jacket shoulders and body contouring dresses. Boiled wools gave a new, bumpy textured surface that toned down the elegance of the formal silhouettes. Most intriguing, however, was the way Maier manipulated wool felt as both a canvas and medium for art-like collages. The material was twisted, scratched, dyed and printed to create novel pattern on cocktail dresses, and later squashed up to look like black Astrakhan, patched together with glossy black satin. What a brilliant sheep-herder Tomas Maier turned out to be.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

By sitting back and taking things easy, creative director Umit Benan delivered one of his best collections to date for Trussardi's womenswear brand. Just by looking at these utterly wearable, covetable clothes, one got the feeling that Benan whipped them up in his sleep one night. Nothing felt forced. Rather Benan hit the right tone of laid back luxury by focusing on the boyish silhouettes for which he's known: roomy pant suits, tailored jackets and oversized trench style coats. Those masculine shells covered feminine cores, like pleat skirts with raw-cut hems and boxy black dresses crafted from thick glossy leather and ponyskin. Cut with spacious volumes that caressed but never clung to the body, Benan struck the ideal balance between feminine polish and sporty ease. No better case in point than the loosened leather pant suits worn with flat loafers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

By sitting back and taking things easy, creative director Umit Benan delivered one of his best collections to date for Trussardi's womenswear brand. Just by looking at these utterly wearable, covetable clothes, one got the feeling that Benan whipped them up in his sleep one night. Nothing felt forced. Rather Benan hit the right tone of laid back luxury by focusing on the boyish silhouettes for which he's known: roomy pant suits, tailored jackets and oversized trench style coats. Those masculine shells covered feminine cores, like pleat skirts with raw-cut hems and boxy black dresses crafted from thick glossy leather and ponyskin. Cut with spacious volumes that caressed but never clung to the body, Benan struck the ideal balance between feminine polish and sporty ease. No better case in point than the loosened leather pant suits worn with flat loafers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

By sitting back and taking things easy, creative director Umit Benan delivered one of his best collections to date for Trussardi's womenswear brand. Just by looking at these utterly wearable, covetable clothes, one got the feeling that Benan whipped them up in his sleep one night. Nothing felt forced. Rather Benan hit the right tone of laid back luxury by focusing on the boyish silhouettes for which he's known: roomy pant suits, tailored jackets and oversized trench style coats. Those masculine shells covered feminine cores, like pleat skirts with raw-cut hems and boxy black dresses crafted from thick glossy leather and ponyskin. Cut with spacious volumes that caressed but never clung to the body, Benan struck the ideal balance between feminine polish and sporty ease. No better case in point than the loosened leather pant suits worn with flat loafers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

By sitting back and taking things easy, creative director Umit Benan delivered one of his best collections to date for Trussardi's womenswear brand. Just by looking at these utterly wearable, covetable clothes, one got the feeling that Benan whipped them up in his sleep one night. Nothing felt forced. Rather Benan hit the right tone of laid back luxury by focusing on the boyish silhouettes for which he's known: roomy pant suits, tailored jackets and oversized trench style coats. Those masculine shells covered feminine cores, like pleat skirts with raw-cut hems and boxy black dresses crafted from thick glossy leather and ponyskin. Cut with spacious volumes that caressed but never clung to the body, Benan struck the ideal balance between feminine polish and sporty ease. No better case in point than the loosened leather pant suits worn with flat loafers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

By sitting back and taking things easy, creative director Umit Benan delivered one of his best collections to date for Trussardi's womenswear brand. Just by looking at these utterly wearable, covetable clothes, one got the feeling that Benan whipped them up in his sleep one night. Nothing felt forced. Rather Benan hit the right tone of laid back luxury by focusing on the boyish silhouettes for which he's known: roomy pant suits, tailored jackets and oversized trench style coats. Those masculine shells covered feminine cores, like pleat skirts with raw-cut hems and boxy black dresses crafted from thick glossy leather and ponyskin. Cut with spacious volumes that caressed but never clung to the body, Benan struck the ideal balance between feminine polish and sporty ease. No better case in point than the loosened leather pant suits worn with flat loafers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Emilio Pucci

What's intriguing about Peter Dundas is the way he defies pre-conceived ideas about Emilio Pucci's history of print. Rather than simply plunder prints from the Florentine house's bulging archive, he plays with and subverts them to new ends. This season he took inspiration from a 1960s Pucci print called Otto, before quickly getting down to the business of abstracting it in micro formats using rich crystal embroideries. After all, a little sparkle, shimmer and shine is a whole lot more fun. And rather than work with the brand's signature silhouettes, Dundas likes to inject his woman with a big fat shot of sex appeal. This season, that meant hems on the ubiquitous shorts, mini skirts and taut dresses were hiked to extremely brief lengths, putting the focus on the woman's hot set of legs. Sensitive to potentially cool weather next Fall, Dundas paired ultra-long, over-the-knee boots with almost every look and created some fabulously plumed fur coats (mink spotted, like a leopard with coq feathers? Genius!) to keep his girl cozy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Emilio Pucci

What's intriguing about Peter Dundas is the way he defies pre-conceived ideas about Emilio Pucci's history of print. Rather than simply plunder prints from the Florentine house's bulging archive, he plays with and subverts them to new ends. This season he took inspiration from a 1960s Pucci print called Otto, before quickly getting down to the business of abstracting it in micro formats using rich crystal embroideries. After all, a little sparkle, shimmer and shine is a whole lot more fun. And rather than work with the brand's signature silhouettes, Dundas likes to inject his woman with a big fat shot of sex appeal. This season, that meant hems on the ubiquitous shorts, mini skirts and taut dresses were hiked to extremely brief lengths, putting the focus on the woman's hot set of legs. Sensitive to potentially cool weather next Fall, Dundas paired ultra-long, over-the-knee boots with almost every look and created some fabulously plumed fur coats (mink spotted, like a leopard with coq feathers? Genius!) to keep his girl cozy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Emilio Pucci

What's intriguing about Peter Dundas is the way he defies pre-conceived ideas about Emilio Pucci's history of print. Rather than simply plunder prints from the Florentine house's bulging archive, he plays with and subverts them to new ends. This season he took inspiration from a 1960s Pucci print called Otto, before quickly getting down to the business of abstracting it in micro formats using rich crystal embroideries. After all, a little sparkle, shimmer and shine is a whole lot more fun. And rather than work with the brand's signature silhouettes, Dundas likes to inject his woman with a big fat shot of sex appeal. This season, that meant hems on the ubiquitous shorts, mini skirts and taut dresses were hiked to extremely brief lengths, putting the focus on the woman's hot set of legs. Sensitive to potentially cool weather next Fall, Dundas paired ultra-long, over-the-knee boots with almost every look and created some fabulously plumed fur coats (mink spotted, like a leopard with coq feathers? Genius!) to keep his girl cozy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Emilio Pucci

What's intriguing about Peter Dundas is the way he defies pre-conceived ideas about Emilio Pucci's history of print. Rather than simply plunder prints from the Florentine house's bulging archive, he plays with and subverts them to new ends. This season he took inspiration from a 1960s Pucci print called Otto, before quickly getting down to the business of abstracting it in micro formats using rich crystal embroideries. After all, a little sparkle, shimmer and shine is a whole lot more fun. And rather than work with the brand's signature silhouettes, Dundas likes to inject his woman with a big fat shot of sex appeal. This season, that meant hems on the ubiquitous shorts, mini skirts and taut dresses were hiked to extremely brief lengths, putting the focus on the woman's hot set of legs. Sensitive to potentially cool weather next Fall, Dundas paired ultra-long, over-the-knee boots with almost every look and created some fabulously plumed fur coats (mink spotted, like a leopard with coq feathers? Genius!) to keep his girl cozy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Emilio Pucci

What's intriguing about Peter Dundas is the way he defies pre-conceived ideas about Emilio Pucci's history of print. Rather than simply plunder prints from the Florentine house's bulging archive, he plays with and subverts them to new ends. This season he took inspiration from a 1960s Pucci print called Otto, before quickly getting down to the business of abstracting it in micro formats using rich crystal embroideries. After all, a little sparkle, shimmer and shine is a whole lot more fun. And rather than work with the brand's signature silhouettes, Dundas likes to inject his woman with a big fat shot of sex appeal. This season, that meant hems on the ubiquitous shorts, mini skirts and taut dresses were hiked to extremely brief lengths, putting the focus on the woman's hot set of legs. Sensitive to potentially cool weather next Fall, Dundas paired ultra-long, over-the-knee boots with almost every look and created some fabulously plumed fur coats (mink spotted, like a leopard with coq feathers? Genius!) to keep his girl cozy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Roberto Cavalli

It's a fur season - both on the runway and off, where fashion editors are wrapping themselves in ever-more flamboyant creations. Who better to take that concept to the next level than Roberto Cavalli. The man has never met an animal print or skin he didn't like, but this season he kept things cool by steering away from leopard or zebra exotica and instead playing with long-haired fox. Tipping it in silver or dipping it in bright magenta or purple, Cavalli let his creativity rip, weaving the luxurious fine hairs into nearly every look: fluffy over-sized jackets, sweaters and tweed two-piece mini skirt suits. On the other hand of the pricey spectrum, he ladled up yards of pea-sized crystal embroideries. Happily, he took a measured approach to both pursuits, balancing ultra short dresses in loosened tunic shapes, and keeping the fur on a leash, even when it was woven into fantastic metal embroideries.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Roberto Cavalli

It's a fur season - both on the runway and off, where fashion editors are wrapping themselves in ever-more flamboyant creations. Who better to take that concept to the next level than Roberto Cavalli. The man has never met an animal print or skin he didn't like, but this season he kept things cool by steering away from leopard or zebra exotica and instead playing with long-haired fox. Tipping it in silver or dipping it in bright magenta or purple, Cavalli let his creativity rip, weaving the luxurious fine hairs into nearly every look: fluffy over-sized jackets, sweaters and tweed two-piece mini skirt suits. On the other hand of the pricey spectrum, he ladled up yards of pea-sized crystal embroideries. Happily, he took a measured approach to both pursuits, balancing ultra short dresses in loosened tunic shapes, and keeping the fur on a leash, even when it was woven into fantastic metal embroideries.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Roberto Cavalli

It's a fur season - both on the runway and off, where fashion editors are wrapping themselves in ever-more flamboyant creations. Who better to take that concept to the next level than Roberto Cavalli. The man has never met an animal print or skin he didn't like, but this season he kept things cool by steering away from leopard or zebra exotica and instead playing with long-haired fox. Tipping it in silver or dipping it in bright magenta or purple, Cavalli let his creativity rip, weaving the luxurious fine hairs into nearly every look: fluffy over-sized jackets, sweaters and tweed two-piece mini skirt suits. On the other hand of the pricey spectrum, he ladled up yards of pea-sized crystal embroideries. Happily, he took a measured approach to both pursuits, balancing ultra short dresses in loosened tunic shapes, and keeping the fur on a leash, even when it was woven into fantastic metal embroideries.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Roberto Cavalli

It's a fur season - both on the runway and off, where fashion editors are wrapping themselves in ever-more flamboyant creations. Who better to take that concept to the next level than Roberto Cavalli. The man has never met an animal print or skin he didn't like, but this season he kept things cool by steering away from leopard or zebra exotica and instead playing with long-haired fox. Tipping it in silver or dipping it in bright magenta or purple, Cavalli let his creativity rip, weaving the luxurious fine hairs into nearly every look: fluffy over-sized jackets, sweaters and tweed two-piece mini skirt suits. On the other hand of the pricey spectrum, he ladled up yards of pea-sized crystal embroideries. Happily, he took a measured approach to both pursuits, balancing ultra short dresses in loosened tunic shapes, and keeping the fur on a leash, even when it was woven into fantastic metal embroideries.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Roberto Cavalli

It's a fur season - both on the runway and off, where fashion editors are wrapping themselves in ever-more flamboyant creations. Who better to take that concept to the next level than Roberto Cavalli. The man has never met an animal print or skin he didn't like, but this season he kept things cool by steering away from leopard or zebra exotica and instead playing with long-haired fox. Tipping it in silver or dipping it in bright magenta or purple, Cavalli let his creativity rip, weaving the luxurious fine hairs into nearly every look: fluffy over-sized jackets, sweaters and tweed two-piece mini skirt suits. On the other hand of the pricey spectrum, he ladled up yards of pea-sized crystal embroideries. Happily, he took a measured approach to both pursuits, balancing ultra short dresses in loosened tunic shapes, and keeping the fur on a leash, even when it was woven into fantastic metal embroideries.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Jil Sander

There's a world of difference between simple and simplistic, a distinction that Jil Sander seemed determined to prove for Fall. The navy coat that opened the show, for example, was cut from perfectly groomed wool and belted with a thick band of blue velvet. The cut was so masterful that the piece managed to look at once slim and voluminous, elongating the model to giraffe-like proportions. Subtle tricks such as this were played throughout the whole collection, such as on a pea coat, pulled snuggly to change its proportions, or on the uneven hems on mid-calf skirts. Even the 'V' of tunic fronts looked masterful.  Sander said her sinuous, controlled forms were inspired by the oeuvre of the great architect Oscar Niemeyer. Backstage she waxed lyrical about her muse: 'His longevity was a true inspiration. People expected him to die at 80. Who would've believed that he'd carry on for another 25 years?' Who indeed?

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Jil Sander

There's a world of difference between simple and simplistic, a distinction that Jil Sander seemed determined to prove for Fall. The navy coat that opened the show, for example, was cut from perfectly groomed wool and belted with a thick band of blue velvet. The cut was so masterful that the piece managed to look at once slim and voluminous, elongating the model to giraffe-like proportions. Subtle tricks such as this were played throughout the whole collection, such as on a pea coat, pulled snuggly to change its proportions, or on the uneven hems on mid-calf skirts. Even the 'V' of tunic fronts looked masterful.  Sander said her sinuous, controlled forms were inspired by the oeuvre of the great architect Oscar Niemeyer. Backstage she waxed lyrical about her muse: 'His longevity was a true inspiration. People expected him to die at 80. Who would've believed that he'd carry on for another 25 years?' Who indeed?

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Jil Sander

There's a world of difference between simple and simplistic, a distinction that Jil Sander seemed determined to prove for Fall. The navy coat that opened the show, for example, was cut from perfectly groomed wool and belted with a thick band of blue velvet. The cut was so masterful that the piece managed to look at once slim and voluminous, elongating the model to giraffe-like proportions. Subtle tricks such as this were played throughout the whole collection, such as on a pea coat, pulled snuggly to change its proportions, or on the uneven hems on mid-calf skirts. Even the 'V' of tunic fronts looked masterful.  Sander said her sinuous, controlled forms were inspired by the oeuvre of the great architect Oscar Niemeyer. Backstage she waxed lyrical about her muse: 'His longevity was a true inspiration. People expected him to die at 80. Who would've believed that he'd carry on for another 25 years?' Who indeed?

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Jil Sander

There's a world of difference between simple and simplistic, a distinction that Jil Sander seemed determined to prove for Fall. The navy coat that opened the show, for example, was cut from perfectly groomed wool and belted with a thick band of blue velvet. The cut was so masterful that the piece managed to look at once slim and voluminous, elongating the model to giraffe-like proportions. Subtle tricks such as this were played throughout the whole collection, such as on a pea coat, pulled snuggly to change its proportions, or on the uneven hems on mid-calf skirts. Even the 'V' of tunic fronts looked masterful.  Sander said her sinuous, controlled forms were inspired by the oeuvre of the great architect Oscar Niemeyer. Backstage she waxed lyrical about her muse: 'His longevity was a true inspiration. People expected him to die at 80. Who would've believed that he'd carry on for another 25 years?' Who indeed?

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Jil Sander

There's a world of difference between simple and simplistic, a distinction that Jil Sander seemed determined to prove for Fall. The navy coat that opened the show, for example, was cut from perfectly groomed wool and belted with a thick band of blue velvet. The cut was so masterful that the piece managed to look at once slim and voluminous, elongating the model to giraffe-like proportions. Subtle tricks such as this were played throughout the whole collection, such as on a pea coat, pulled snuggly to change its proportions, or on the uneven hems on mid-calf skirts. Even the 'V' of tunic fronts looked masterful.  Sander said her sinuous, controlled forms were inspired by the oeuvre of the great architect Oscar Niemeyer. Backstage she waxed lyrical about her muse: 'His longevity was a true inspiration. People expected him to die at 80. Who would've believed that he'd carry on for another 25 years?' Who indeed?

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Marni

Fur is often treated as the go-to material for peacock-strutting, skin-baring vixens. But the high fashion woman - one who would perhaps want to wear the material in a more restrained manner - can also find refuge at Marni where Consuelo Castiglioni employs the material with considerable care and thoughtful execution. This season she cut bold swathes of glossy long hair fox and applied them as oversized trims on sharply-cut A-line wool dresses, two-piece skirt suits and on Marni's signature voluminous coats. An infusion of mannish, serious materials, like dense grey wools, tweeds and black felts, sobered up flashy fur details like goat hair Eskimo boots and the brightly-coloured mink stoles that were bound to the body like a fluffy snake in captivity. It is inspiring to see that in a town where sex appeal sells, someone is still holding out for the brainy beautiful girls.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Marni

Fur is often treated as the go-to material for peacock-strutting, skin-baring vixens. But the high fashion woman - one who would perhaps want to wear the material in a more restrained manner - can also find refuge at Marni where Consuelo Castiglioni employs the material with considerable care and thoughtful execution. This season she cut bold swathes of glossy long hair fox and applied them as oversized trims on sharply-cut A-line wool dresses, two-piece skirt suits and on Marni's signature voluminous coats. An infusion of mannish, serious materials, like dense grey wools, tweeds and black felts, sobered up flashy fur details like goat hair Eskimo boots and the brightly-coloured mink stoles that were bound to the body like a fluffy snake in captivity. It is inspiring to see that in a town where sex appeal sells, someone is still holding out for the brainy beautiful girls.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Marni

Fur is often treated as the go-to material for peacock-strutting, skin-baring vixens. But the high fashion woman - one who would perhaps want to wear the material in a more restrained manner - can also find refuge at Marni where Consuelo Castiglioni employs the material with considerable care and thoughtful execution. This season she cut bold swathes of glossy long hair fox and applied them as oversized trims on sharply-cut A-line wool dresses, two-piece skirt suits and on Marni's signature voluminous coats. An infusion of mannish, serious materials, like dense grey wools, tweeds and black felts, sobered up flashy fur details like goat hair Eskimo boots and the brightly-coloured mink stoles that were bound to the body like a fluffy snake in captivity. It is inspiring to see that in a town where sex appeal sells, someone is still holding out for the brainy beautiful girls.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Marni

Fur is often treated as the go-to material for peacock-strutting, skin-baring vixens. But the high fashion woman - one who would perhaps want to wear the material in a more restrained manner - can also find refuge at Marni where Consuelo Castiglioni employs the material with considerable care and thoughtful execution. This season she cut bold swathes of glossy long hair fox and applied them as oversized trims on sharply-cut A-line wool dresses, two-piece skirt suits and on Marni's signature voluminous coats. An infusion of mannish, serious materials, like dense grey wools, tweeds and black felts, sobered up flashy fur details like goat hair Eskimo boots and the brightly-coloured mink stoles that were bound to the body like a fluffy snake in captivity. It is inspiring to see that in a town where sex appeal sells, someone is still holding out for the brainy beautiful girls.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Marni

Fur is often treated as the go-to material for peacock-strutting, skin-baring vixens. But the high fashion woman - one who would perhaps want to wear the material in a more restrained manner - can also find refuge at Marni where Consuelo Castiglioni employs the material with considerable care and thoughtful execution. This season she cut bold swathes of glossy long hair fox and applied them as oversized trims on sharply-cut A-line wool dresses, two-piece skirt suits and on Marni's signature voluminous coats. An infusion of mannish, serious materials, like dense grey wools, tweeds and black felts, sobered up flashy fur details like goat hair Eskimo boots and the brightly-coloured mink stoles that were bound to the body like a fluffy snake in captivity. It is inspiring to see that in a town where sex appeal sells, someone is still holding out for the brainy beautiful girls.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Emporio Armani

Giorgio Armani cited 'Kajal', the Hindu name for kohl (the ancient eyeliner) as inspiration for his Emporio Armani show. Though there were doses of mineral-tinged tones, the most eye-popping colours came in the form of the ice cream pastels. When these were handled in a pared-down, minimal way, the results were lovely, as in the case of a perfect celery-coloured, carrot-shaped trouser worn with a dove grey jacket and ice blue leather bag. But Mr. Armani's dalliance with a series of sugar-tinted pastel mohair - on voluminous trousers or sharply-flared fuzzy dresses worn over black trousers - were almost too sweet to swallow, especially with the 1990s headgear served as a chaser. We loved it best when Mr. Armani stripped the looks of the funny business, and showed us why he is the best cutter in town. Case in point: the awesome, luxurious green velvet olden coat and jacket, worn with simple black trousers and pointy flats

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Emporio Armani

Giorgio Armani cited 'Kajal', the Hindu name for kohl (the ancient eyeliner) as inspiration for his Emporio Armani show. Though there were doses of mineral-tinged tones, the most eye-popping colours came in the form of the ice cream pastels. When these were handled in a pared-down, minimal way, the results were lovely, as in the case of a perfect celery-coloured, carrot-shaped trouser worn with a dove grey jacket and ice blue leather bag. But Mr. Armani's dalliance with a series of sugar-tinted pastel mohair - on voluminous trousers or sharply-flared fuzzy dresses worn over black trousers - were almost too sweet to swallow, especially with the 1990s headgear served as a chaser. We loved it best when Mr. Armani stripped the looks of the funny business, and showed us why he is the best cutter in town. Case in point: the awesome, luxurious green velvet olden coat and jacket, worn with simple black trousers and pointy flats

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Emporio Armani

Giorgio Armani cited 'Kajal', the Hindu name for kohl (the ancient eyeliner) as inspiration for his Emporio Armani show. Though there were doses of mineral-tinged tones, the most eye-popping colours came in the form of the ice cream pastels. When these were handled in a pared-down, minimal way, the results were lovely, as in the case of a perfect celery-coloured, carrot-shaped trouser worn with a dove grey jacket and ice blue leather bag. But Mr. Armani's dalliance with a series of sugar-tinted pastel mohair - on voluminous trousers or sharply-flared fuzzy dresses worn over black trousers - were almost too sweet to swallow, especially with the 1990s headgear served as a chaser. We loved it best when Mr. Armani stripped the looks of the funny business, and showed us why he is the best cutter in town. Case in point: the awesome, luxurious green velvet olden coat and jacket, worn with simple black trousers and pointy flats

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Emporio Armani

Giorgio Armani cited 'Kajal', the Hindu name for kohl (the ancient eyeliner) as inspiration for his Emporio Armani show. Though there were doses of mineral-tinged tones, the most eye-popping colours came in the form of the ice cream pastels. When these were handled in a pared-down, minimal way, the results were lovely, as in the case of a perfect celery-coloured, carrot-shaped trouser worn with a dove grey jacket and ice blue leather bag. But Mr. Armani's dalliance with a series of sugar-tinted pastel mohair - on voluminous trousers or sharply-flared fuzzy dresses worn over black trousers - were almost too sweet to swallow, especially with the 1990s headgear served as a chaser. We loved it best when Mr. Armani stripped the looks of the funny business, and showed us why he is the best cutter in town. Case in point: the awesome, luxurious green velvet olden coat and jacket, worn with simple black trousers and pointy flats

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Emporio Armani

Giorgio Armani cited 'Kajal', the Hindu name for kohl (the ancient eyeliner) as inspiration for his Emporio Armani show. Though there were doses of mineral-tinged tones, the most eye-popping colours came in the form of the ice cream pastels. When these were handled in a pared-down, minimal way, the results were lovely, as in the case of a perfect celery-coloured, carrot-shaped trouser worn with a dove grey jacket and ice blue leather bag. But Mr. Armani's dalliance with a series of sugar-tinted pastel mohair - on voluminous trousers or sharply-flared fuzzy dresses worn over black trousers - were almost too sweet to swallow, especially with the 1990s headgear served as a chaser. We loved it best when Mr. Armani stripped the looks of the funny business, and showed us why he is the best cutter in town. Case in point: the awesome, luxurious green velvet olden coat and jacket, worn with simple black trousers and pointy flats

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Dolce & Gabbana

Religious fervour is reaching a crescendo in the church of Dolce & Gabbana this Fall. Models strode down the runway in gold stone-encrusted crowns, dresses embellished with mosaic-style prints of Christian saints and the Virgin Mary, and papal-red lace dresses luxuriously bedecked with embroideries and stones. A series of distinctly Hitchcockian, 1950s grey tweed looks were also in the mix, nicely accessorised with bags and jewellery inspired by religious iconography. One such look - a grey below-the-knee pencil skirt, worn with an oversized mosiac-print T-Shirt - gave the retro silhouettes a cool, contemporary glaze. The collection was inspired by the breathtaking golden mosaics that cover the cloisters of Sicily's famed Cathedral of Monreale, erected in 1185 by Norman King William II. Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana took cues from these reverent scenes - William II being crowned by Christ himself, and William II offering the church to the Virgin Mary - using the mosaics of Monreale as their leitmotif for an altogether heavenly offering. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Dolce & Gabbana

Religious fervour is reaching a crescendo in the church of Dolce & Gabbana this Fall. Models strode down the runway in gold stone-encrusted crowns, dresses embellished with mosaic-style prints of Christian saints and the Virgin Mary, and papal-red lace dresses luxuriously bedecked with embroideries and stones. A series of distinctly Hitchcockian, 1950s grey tweed looks were also in the mix, nicely accessorised with bags and jewellery inspired by religious iconography. One such look - a grey below-the-knee pencil skirt, worn with an oversized mosiac-print T-Shirt - gave the retro silhouettes a cool, contemporary glaze. The collection was inspired by the breathtaking golden mosaics that cover the cloisters of Sicily's famed Cathedral of Monreale, erected in 1185 by Norman King William II. Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana took cues from these reverent scenes - William II being crowned by Christ himself, and William II offering the church to the Virgin Mary - using the mosaics of Monreale as their leitmotif for an altogether heavenly offering. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Dolce & Gabbana

Religious fervour is reaching a crescendo in the church of Dolce & Gabbana this Fall. Models strode down the runway in gold stone-encrusted crowns, dresses embellished with mosaic-style prints of Christian saints and the Virgin Mary, and papal-red lace dresses luxuriously bedecked with embroideries and stones. A series of distinctly Hitchcockian, 1950s grey tweed looks were also in the mix, nicely accessorised with bags and jewellery inspired by religious iconography. One such look - a grey below-the-knee pencil skirt, worn with an oversized mosiac-print T-Shirt - gave the retro silhouettes a cool, contemporary glaze. The collection was inspired by the breathtaking golden mosaics that cover the cloisters of Sicily's famed Cathedral of Monreale, erected in 1185 by Norman King William II. Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana took cues from these reverent scenes - William II being crowned by Christ himself, and William II offering the church to the Virgin Mary - using the mosaics of Monreale as their leitmotif for an altogether heavenly offering. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Dolce & Gabbana

Religious fervour is reaching a crescendo in the church of Dolce & Gabbana this Fall. Models strode down the runway in gold stone-encrusted crowns, dresses embellished with mosaic-style prints of Christian saints and the Virgin Mary, and papal-red lace dresses luxuriously bedecked with embroideries and stones. A series of distinctly Hitchcockian, 1950s grey tweed looks were also in the mix, nicely accessorised with bags and jewellery inspired by religious iconography. One such look - a grey below-the-knee pencil skirt, worn with an oversized mosiac-print T-Shirt - gave the retro silhouettes a cool, contemporary glaze. The collection was inspired by the breathtaking golden mosaics that cover the cloisters of Sicily's famed Cathedral of Monreale, erected in 1185 by Norman King William II. Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana took cues from these reverent scenes - William II being crowned by Christ himself, and William II offering the church to the Virgin Mary - using the mosaics of Monreale as their leitmotif for an altogether heavenly offering. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Dolce & Gabbana

Religious fervour is reaching a crescendo in the church of Dolce & Gabbana this Fall. Models strode down the runway in gold stone-encrusted crowns, dresses embellished with mosaic-style prints of Christian saints and the Virgin Mary, and papal-red lace dresses luxuriously bedecked with embroideries and stones. A series of distinctly Hitchcockian, 1950s grey tweed looks were also in the mix, nicely accessorised with bags and jewellery inspired by religious iconography. One such look - a grey below-the-knee pencil skirt, worn with an oversized mosiac-print T-Shirt - gave the retro silhouettes a cool, contemporary glaze. The collection was inspired by the breathtaking golden mosaics that cover the cloisters of Sicily's famed Cathedral of Monreale, erected in 1185 by Norman King William II. Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana took cues from these reverent scenes - William II being crowned by Christ himself, and William II offering the church to the Virgin Mary - using the mosaics of Monreale as their leitmotif for an altogether heavenly offering. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Apphia Michael

Missoni

Just by dipping into her family's heritage of knitwear, Angela Missoni naturally possesses one of the most seasonally appropriate Fall collections on the Milan calendar. What she does with those temperature-friendly knits, of course, is what makes Missoni stand out. Even when constructed from a mere whiff of frosty pink gauze or metal-flecked silk, her body-clinging, backless dresses give off more natural heat than most. Curve-conscious silhouettes were tempered with oversized coats on the outside, like fuzzy alpaca bathrobes that slumped off the models' shoulders. Most of the luxury in this collection rode along in a low-radar, stealthy sort of way: you had to be up close to notice the special effects created by cashmere knits and cashmere weaves, combinations like alpaca and mink or beaver and calfskin, all mingling like intimate dance partners on the same pieces

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Missoni

Just by dipping into her family's heritage of knitwear, Angela Missoni naturally possesses one of the most seasonally appropriate Fall collections on the Milan calendar. What she does with those temperature-friendly knits, of course, is what makes Missoni stand out. Even when constructed from a mere whiff of frosty pink gauze or metal-flecked silk, her body-clinging, backless dresses give off more natural heat than most. Curve-conscious silhouettes were tempered with oversized coats on the outside, like fuzzy alpaca bathrobes that slumped off the models' shoulders. Most of the luxury in this collection rode along in a low-radar, stealthy sort of way: you had to be up close to notice the special effects created by cashmere knits and cashmere weaves, combinations like alpaca and mink or beaver and calfskin, all mingling like intimate dance partners on the same pieces

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Missoni

Just by dipping into her family's heritage of knitwear, Angela Missoni naturally possesses one of the most seasonally appropriate Fall collections on the Milan calendar. What she does with those temperature-friendly knits, of course, is what makes Missoni stand out. Even when constructed from a mere whiff of frosty pink gauze or metal-flecked silk, her body-clinging, backless dresses give off more natural heat than most. Curve-conscious silhouettes were tempered with oversized coats on the outside, like fuzzy alpaca bathrobes that slumped off the models' shoulders. Most of the luxury in this collection rode along in a low-radar, stealthy sort of way: you had to be up close to notice the special effects created by cashmere knits and cashmere weaves, combinations like alpaca and mink or beaver and calfskin, all mingling like intimate dance partners on the same pieces

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Missoni

Just by dipping into her family's heritage of knitwear, Angela Missoni naturally possesses one of the most seasonally appropriate Fall collections on the Milan calendar. What she does with those temperature-friendly knits, of course, is what makes Missoni stand out. Even when constructed from a mere whiff of frosty pink gauze or metal-flecked silk, her body-clinging, backless dresses give off more natural heat than most. Curve-conscious silhouettes were tempered with oversized coats on the outside, like fuzzy alpaca bathrobes that slumped off the models' shoulders. Most of the luxury in this collection rode along in a low-radar, stealthy sort of way: you had to be up close to notice the special effects created by cashmere knits and cashmere weaves, combinations like alpaca and mink or beaver and calfskin, all mingling like intimate dance partners on the same pieces

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Missoni

Just by dipping into her family's heritage of knitwear, Angela Missoni naturally possesses one of the most seasonally appropriate Fall collections on the Milan calendar. What she does with those temperature-friendly knits, of course, is what makes Missoni stand out. Even when constructed from a mere whiff of frosty pink gauze or metal-flecked silk, her body-clinging, backless dresses give off more natural heat than most. Curve-conscious silhouettes were tempered with oversized coats on the outside, like fuzzy alpaca bathrobes that slumped off the models' shoulders. Most of the luxury in this collection rode along in a low-radar, stealthy sort of way: you had to be up close to notice the special effects created by cashmere knits and cashmere weaves, combinations like alpaca and mink or beaver and calfskin, all mingling like intimate dance partners on the same pieces

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

Massimiliano Giornetti has been on a creative roll for the last few seasons and the positive momentum did not stop for Fall. Employing a rigorously focused palette of navy and black, Giornetti brought tempered sex appeal to his most sombre, edgy collection to date. The silhouettes looked rather saucy: thigh-grazing stiffened skirts, stovepipe trousers or satin dresses pieced together with metal zip seams. But Giornetti employed a modern, sensitive hand with materials and styling that prevented the collection from ever veering into anything remotely trashy. On the contrary, his cropped coat worn over a bare pair of legs looked positively cozy in a fuzzy mohair, while the sharply-cut skirts in leather had a modernist flare.  Best of all was the footwear: wonderful hybrids of manageable 90 mm pointy-toed stilettos with sultry back lace-up boots. We can't wait to take those out for a test drive.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

Massimiliano Giornetti has been on a creative roll for the last few seasons and the positive momentum did not stop for Fall. Employing a rigorously focused palette of navy and black, Giornetti brought tempered sex appeal to his most sombre, edgy collection to date. The silhouettes looked rather saucy: thigh-grazing stiffened skirts, stovepipe trousers or satin dresses pieced together with metal zip seams. But Giornetti employed a modern, sensitive hand with materials and styling that prevented the collection from ever veering into anything remotely trashy. On the contrary, his cropped coat worn over a bare pair of legs looked positively cozy in a fuzzy mohair, while the sharply-cut skirts in leather had a modernist flare.  Best of all was the footwear: wonderful hybrids of manageable 90 mm pointy-toed stilettos with sultry back lace-up boots. We can't wait to take those out for a test drive.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

Massimiliano Giornetti has been on a creative roll for the last few seasons and the positive momentum did not stop for Fall. Employing a rigorously focused palette of navy and black, Giornetti brought tempered sex appeal to his most sombre, edgy collection to date. The silhouettes looked rather saucy: thigh-grazing stiffened skirts, stovepipe trousers or satin dresses pieced together with metal zip seams. But Giornetti employed a modern, sensitive hand with materials and styling that prevented the collection from ever veering into anything remotely trashy. On the contrary, his cropped coat worn over a bare pair of legs looked positively cozy in a fuzzy mohair, while the sharply-cut skirts in leather had a modernist flare.  Best of all was the footwear: wonderful hybrids of manageable 90 mm pointy-toed stilettos with sultry back lace-up boots. We can't wait to take those out for a test drive.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

Massimiliano Giornetti has been on a creative roll for the last few seasons and the positive momentum did not stop for Fall. Employing a rigorously focused palette of navy and black, Giornetti brought tempered sex appeal to his most sombre, edgy collection to date. The silhouettes looked rather saucy: thigh-grazing stiffened skirts, stovepipe trousers or satin dresses pieced together with metal zip seams. But Giornetti employed a modern, sensitive hand with materials and styling that prevented the collection from ever veering into anything remotely trashy. On the contrary, his cropped coat worn over a bare pair of legs looked positively cozy in a fuzzy mohair, while the sharply-cut skirts in leather had a modernist flare.  Best of all was the footwear: wonderful hybrids of manageable 90 mm pointy-toed stilettos with sultry back lace-up boots. We can't wait to take those out for a test drive.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

Massimiliano Giornetti has been on a creative roll for the last few seasons and the positive momentum did not stop for Fall. Employing a rigorously focused palette of navy and black, Giornetti brought tempered sex appeal to his most sombre, edgy collection to date. The silhouettes looked rather saucy: thigh-grazing stiffened skirts, stovepipe trousers or satin dresses pieced together with metal zip seams. But Giornetti employed a modern, sensitive hand with materials and styling that prevented the collection from ever veering into anything remotely trashy. On the contrary, his cropped coat worn over a bare pair of legs looked positively cozy in a fuzzy mohair, while the sharply-cut skirts in leather had a modernist flare.  Best of all was the footwear: wonderful hybrids of manageable 90 mm pointy-toed stilettos with sultry back lace-up boots. We can't wait to take those out for a test drive.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Giorgio Armani

If there is any designer in the world who has the right to dub his womenswear collection 'Garçonne' it's Giorgio Armani, the man who brought the simplicity and purity of menswear to Women's fashion in the first place. A lot has changed in the past 38 years, but the one thing that still rings true is a designer who knows how to cut. Armani put the focus on his scalpel this season, a decision made all the more obvious by his almost all-black palette. Trousers in rich velvet had a lovely, soft volume to them, paired with mini velvet waist coats or intricate beaded tops for the evening. The classic Armani jacket was reintroduced in a slightly flared textured wool with black and white squares, while elegant white three-quarter-sleeve tops featured feminine peplums. These clean looks represented the understated chic that we know and love Giorgio Armani for.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Giorgio Armani

If there is any designer in the world who has the right to dub his womenswear collection 'Garçonne' it's Giorgio Armani, the man who brought the simplicity and purity of menswear to Women's fashion in the first place. A lot has changed in the past 38 years, but the one thing that still rings true is a designer who knows how to cut. Armani put the focus on his scalpel this season, a decision made all the more obvious by his almost all-black palette. Trousers in rich velvet had a lovely, soft volume to them, paired with mini velvet waist coats or intricate beaded tops for the evening. The classic Armani jacket was reintroduced in a slightly flared textured wool with black and white squares, while elegant white three-quarter-sleeve tops featured feminine peplums. These clean looks represented the understated chic that we know and love Giorgio Armani for.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Giorgio Armani

If there is any designer in the world who has the right to dub his womenswear collection 'Garçonne' it's Giorgio Armani, the man who brought the simplicity and purity of menswear to Women's fashion in the first place. A lot has changed in the past 38 years, but the one thing that still rings true is a designer who knows how to cut. Armani put the focus on his scalpel this season, a decision made all the more obvious by his almost all-black palette. Trousers in rich velvet had a lovely, soft volume to them, paired with mini velvet waist coats or intricate beaded tops for the evening. The classic Armani jacket was reintroduced in a slightly flared textured wool with black and white squares, while elegant white three-quarter-sleeve tops featured feminine peplums. These clean looks represented the understated chic that we know and love Giorgio Armani for.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Giorgio Armani

If there is any designer in the world who has the right to dub his womenswear collection 'Garçonne' it's Giorgio Armani, the man who brought the simplicity and purity of menswear to Women's fashion in the first place. A lot has changed in the past 38 years, but the one thing that still rings true is a designer who knows how to cut. Armani put the focus on his scalpel this season, a decision made all the more obvious by his almost all-black palette. Trousers in rich velvet had a lovely, soft volume to them, paired with mini velvet waist coats or intricate beaded tops for the evening. The classic Armani jacket was reintroduced in a slightly flared textured wool with black and white squares, while elegant white three-quarter-sleeve tops featured feminine peplums. These clean looks represented the understated chic that we know and love Giorgio Armani for.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Giorgio Armani

If there is any designer in the world who has the right to dub his womenswear collection 'Garçonne' it's Giorgio Armani, the man who brought the simplicity and purity of menswear to Women's fashion in the first place. A lot has changed in the past 38 years, but the one thing that still rings true is a designer who knows how to cut. Armani put the focus on his scalpel this season, a decision made all the more obvious by his almost all-black palette. Trousers in rich velvet had a lovely, soft volume to them, paired with mini velvet waist coats or intricate beaded tops for the evening. The classic Armani jacket was reintroduced in a slightly flared textured wool with black and white squares, while elegant white three-quarter-sleeve tops featured feminine peplums. These clean looks represented the understated chic that we know and love Giorgio Armani for.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Gucci

A strong scent of couture has wafted off fashion runways of late, most recently in New York where we saw a sea of shoulders curved into the round shapes made famous in the haute couture ateliers of the 1960s. Frida Giannini also caught couture fever this season at Gucci, but ran the distance with it, cinching her models' waists into wasp-like proportions, slicing open dress neck holes in demure, horizontal slits, and cutting ladylike pencil skirts with matching trapeze jackets. If it all sounds like the sort of outfits a Hitchcockian Tippi Hedren would have worn, think again. Giannini coated her womanly silhouettes in a glaze of hot naughtiness. The prim tailleurs were worn with fierce python stiletto boots, 'bad girl' black leather gloves and paper-thin leather bodysuits that clung to the skin like black matte cling film. The best looks were in the first three-quarters of the show when Giannini brought a subversive edge to classically feminine shapes, while the evening line-up ran off on a somewhat awkward course. No matter:  a pencil-skirted, peplumed tailleur in glossy black python, a swing jacket and matching skirt in glossy astrakhan, and thread embroideries tracing the taut lines of trouser suits were all calibrated to perfection. The lady, it turns out, is a glorious tramp.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin


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