Valentino

Designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccoli are riding their own growing wave in menswear. Graphic plays with houndstooth and Prince of Wales checks came on sleek capes, two-button jackets and long overcoats that concealed duvet lining to stave off the coldest of temperatures. A raw denim two-piece suit with trousers grazing the ankle caught the eye as did the sleek accessories. Models wore black Chelsea boots with a buckle detail or brogues lined with signature Valentino studs. Eye-wear oozed 1970s cool à la Michael Caine, while bags were precise - zip pouches with a leather strap through which hands could be slipped for a firm grip. A reason why the Valentino cut looks so slick? Thermoform tailoring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

 

Valentino

Designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccoli are riding their own growing wave in menswear. Graphic plays with houndstooth and Prince of Wales checks came on sleek capes, two-button jackets and long overcoats that concealed duvet lining to stave off the coldest of temperatures. A raw denim two-piece suit with trousers grazing the ankle caught the eye as did the sleek accessories. Models wore black Chelsea boots with a buckle detail or brogues lined with signature Valentino studs. Eye-wear oozed 1970s cool à la Michael Caine, while bags were precise - zip pouches with a leather strap through which hands could be slipped for a firm grip. A reason why the Valentino cut looks so slick? Thermoform tailoring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Valentino

Designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccoli are riding their own growing wave in menswear. Graphic plays with houndstooth and Prince of Wales checks came on sleek capes, two-button jackets and long overcoats that concealed duvet lining to stave off the coldest of temperatures. A raw denim two-piece suit with trousers grazing the ankle caught the eye as did the sleek accessories. Models wore black Chelsea boots with a buckle detail or brogues lined with signature Valentino studs. Eye-wear oozed 1970s cool à la Michael Caine, while bags were precise - zip pouches with a leather strap through which hands could be slipped for a firm grip. A reason why the Valentino cut looks so slick? Thermoform tailoring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

 

Valentino

Designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccoli are riding their own growing wave in menswear. Graphic plays with houndstooth and Prince of Wales checks came on sleek capes, two-button jackets and long overcoats that concealed duvet lining to stave off the coldest of temperatures. A raw denim two-piece suit with trousers grazing the ankle caught the eye as did the sleek accessories. Models wore black Chelsea boots with a buckle detail or brogues lined with signature Valentino studs. Eye-wear oozed 1970s cool à la Michael Caine, while bags were precise - zip pouches with a leather strap through which hands could be slipped for a firm grip. A reason why the Valentino cut looks so slick? Thermoform tailoring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

 

Valentino

Designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccoli are riding their own growing wave in menswear. Graphic plays with houndstooth and Prince of Wales checks came on sleek capes, two-button jackets and long overcoats that concealed duvet lining to stave off the coldest of temperatures. A raw denim two-piece suit with trousers grazing the ankle caught the eye as did the sleek accessories. Models wore black Chelsea boots with a buckle detail or brogues lined with signature Valentino studs. Eye-wear oozed 1970s cool à la Michael Caine, while bags were precise - zip pouches with a leather strap through which hands could be slipped for a firm grip. A reason why the Valentino cut looks so slick? Thermoform tailoring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

 

Raf Simons

Collars and colours were the busy focus of Raf Simons' studio today, with all sorts of ideas applied to the neckline plus a palette that mixed bright pastels with rustic tones. A thick stripe of material reached across collarbones to each shoulder keeping the wearer's jacket closed, presumably against blustery winds. Long, pointy collars over a high turtle-neck or neck-tie gave opportunity to splash colour on dark overcoats. Interest was piqued however by the accessories, especially the running shoes with panels of said pastel brights and then bags which were mostly small silk rucksacks held like clutches.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Raf Simons

Collars and colours were the busy focus of Raf Simons' studio today, with all sorts of ideas applied to the neckline plus a palette that mixed bright pastels with rustic tones. A thick stripe of material reached across collarbones to each shoulder keeping the wearer's jacket closed, presumably against blustery winds. Long, pointy collars over a high turtle-neck or neck-tie gave opportunity to splash colour on dark overcoats. Interest was piqued however by the accessories, especially the running shoes with panels of said pastel brights and then bags which were mostly small silk rucksacks held like clutches.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Raf Simons

Collars and colours were the busy focus of Raf Simons' studio today, with all sorts of ideas applied to the neckline plus a palette that mixed bright pastels with rustic tones. A thick stripe of material reached across collarbones to each shoulder keeping the wearer's jacket closed, presumably against blustery winds. Long, pointy collars over a high turtle-neck or neck-tie gave opportunity to splash colour on dark overcoats. Interest was piqued however by the accessories, especially the running shoes with panels of said pastel brights and then bags which were mostly small silk rucksacks held like clutches.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

 

Raf Simons

Collars and colours were the busy focus of Raf Simons' studio today, with all sorts of ideas applied to the neckline plus a palette that mixed bright pastels with rustic tones. A thick stripe of material reached across collarbones to each shoulder keeping the wearer's jacket closed, presumably against blustery winds. Long, pointy collars over a high turtle-neck or neck-tie gave opportunity to splash colour on dark overcoats. Interest was piqued however by the accessories, especially the running shoes with panels of said pastel brights and then bags which were mostly small silk rucksacks held like clutches.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

 

Raf Simons

Collars and colours were the busy focus of Raf Simons' studio today, with all sorts of ideas applied to the neckline plus a palette that mixed bright pastels with rustic tones. A thick stripe of material reached across collarbones to each shoulder keeping the wearer's jacket closed, presumably against blustery winds. Long, pointy collars over a high turtle-neck or neck-tie gave opportunity to splash colour on dark overcoats. Interest was piqued however by the accessories, especially the running shoes with panels of said pastel brights and then bags which were mostly small silk rucksacks held like clutches.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

 

Rick Owens

Rick Owens went to the mountains for Fall. And so it followed - quilted and belted jackets worn with big boots built for crunching snow. Owens wrapped his men in his signature mix of luxurious textures, namely the best in leather, fur, wool, shearling and cotton in shapes that borrowed a little from Asia and much from cyberspace. He gave attention to the weight, volume and shapes around every neckline, making sure that each hood or raised collar possessed the lines which spoke clearly of its designer. Out from the clubs and into mountain cabins, Rick Owens is a lifestyle now.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Rick Owens

Rick Owens went to the mountains for Fall. And so it followed - quilted and belted jackets worn with big boots built for crunching snow. Owens wrapped his men in his signature mix of luxurious textures, namely the best in leather, fur, wool, shearling and cotton in shapes that borrowed a little from Asia and much from cyberspace. He gave attention to the weight, volume and shapes around every neckline, making sure that each hood or raised collar possessed the lines which spoke clearly of its designer. Out from the clubs and into mountain cabins, Rick Owens is a lifestyle now.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Rick Owens

Rick Owens went to the mountains for Fall. And so it followed - quilted and belted jackets worn with big boots built for crunching snow. Owens wrapped his men in his signature mix of luxurious textures, namely the best in leather, fur, wool, shearling and cotton in shapes that borrowed a little from Asia and much from cyberspace. He gave attention to the weight, volume and shapes around every neckline, making sure that each hood or raised collar possessed the lines which spoke clearly of its designer. Out from the clubs and into mountain cabins, Rick Owens is a lifestyle now.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Rick Owens

Rick Owens went to the mountains for Fall. And so it followed - quilted and belted jackets worn with big boots built for crunching snow. Owens wrapped his men in his signature mix of luxurious textures, namely the best in leather, fur, wool, shearling and cotton in shapes that borrowed a little from Asia and much from cyberspace. He gave attention to the weight, volume and shapes around every neckline, making sure that each hood or raised collar possessed the lines which spoke clearly of its designer. Out from the clubs and into mountain cabins, Rick Owens is a lifestyle now.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Rick Owens

Rick Owens went to the mountains for Fall. And so it followed - quilted and belted jackets worn with big boots built for crunching snow. Owens wrapped his men in his signature mix of luxurious textures, namely the best in leather, fur, wool, shearling and cotton in shapes that borrowed a little from Asia and much from cyberspace. He gave attention to the weight, volume and shapes around every neckline, making sure that each hood or raised collar possessed the lines which spoke clearly of its designer. Out from the clubs and into mountain cabins, Rick Owens is a lifestyle now.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Louis Vuitton

Diane Vreeland described her intensely striking, entirely red salon that was jammed with swirling prints as her 'garden of hell'. How pleased she would have been to know that she had inspired creative director Kim Jones and Brit artists, the Chapman Brothers, to create a series of prints on silk, jacquard and cashmere for Vuitton's menswear showcase. Vreeland and the curious animals of the Himalayas were the cues for the final tier of the show, but proceeding that came a strong section of winter wear fit for trekking. Think power puffa jackets - the 'puff' really very robust - fur-lined parkas and a desirable blanket coat with fur trim. Details, and there were many, came via shearling bags shorn with the letter V, belts clasped shut with rock climber carabiners and prints and motifs of animals hailing from Bhutan, such as a snow leopard designed by the Chapman brothers who were present at the show.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Louis Vuitton

Diane Vreeland described her intensely striking, entirely red salon that was jammed with swirling prints as her 'garden of hell'. How pleased she would have been to know that she had inspired creative director Kim Jones and Brit artists, the Chapman Brothers, to create a series of prints on silk, jacquard and cashmere for Vuitton's menswear showcase. Vreeland and the curious animals of the Himalayas were the cues for the final tier of the show, but proceeding that came a strong section of winter wear fit for trekking. Think power puffa jackets - the 'puff' really very robust - fur-lined parkas and a desirable blanket coat with fur trim. Details, and there were many, came via shearling bags shorn with the letter V, belts clasped shut with rock climber carabiners and prints and motifs of animals hailing from Bhutan, such as a snow leopard designed by the Chapman brothers who were present at the show.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Louis Vuitton

Diane Vreeland described her intensely striking, entirely red salon that was jammed with swirling prints as her 'garden of hell'. How pleased she would have been to know that she had inspired creative director Kim Jones and Brit artists, the Chapman Brothers, to create a series of prints on silk, jacquard and cashmere for Vuitton's menswear showcase. Vreeland and the curious animals of the Himalayas were the cues for the final tier of the show, but proceeding that came a strong section of winter wear fit for trekking. Think power puffa jackets - the 'puff' really very robust - fur-lined parkas and a desirable blanket coat with fur trim. Details, and there were many, came via shearling bags shorn with the letter V, belts clasped shut with rock climber carabiners and prints and motifs of animals hailing from Bhutan, such as a snow leopard designed by the Chapman brothers who were present at the show.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Louis Vuitton

Diane Vreeland described her intensely striking, entirely red salon that was jammed with swirling prints as her 'garden of hell'. How pleased she would have been to know that she had inspired creative director Kim Jones and Brit artists, the Chapman Brothers, to create a series of prints on silk, jacquard and cashmere for Vuitton's menswear showcase. Vreeland and the curious animals of the Himalayas were the cues for the final tier of the show, but proceeding that came a strong section of winter wear fit for trekking. Think power puffa jackets - the 'puff' really very robust - fur-lined parkas and a desirable blanket coat with fur trim. Details, and there were many, came via shearling bags shorn with the letter V, belts clasped shut with rock climber carabiners and prints and motifs of animals hailing from Bhutan, such as a snow leopard designed by the Chapman brothers who were present at the show.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Louis Vuitton

Diane Vreeland described her intensely striking, entirely red salon that was jammed with swirling prints as her 'garden of hell'. How pleased she would have been to know that she had inspired creative director Kim Jones and Brit artists, the Chapman Brothers, to create a series of prints on silk, jacquard and cashmere for Vuitton's menswear showcase. Vreeland and the curious animals of the Himalayas were the cues for the final tier of the show, but proceeding that came a strong section of winter wear fit for trekking. Think power puffa jackets - the 'puff' really very robust - fur-lined parkas and a desirable blanket coat with fur trim. Details, and there were many, came via shearling bags shorn with the letter V, belts clasped shut with rock climber carabiners and prints and motifs of animals hailing from Bhutan, such as a snow leopard designed by the Chapman brothers who were present at the show.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Dries Van Noten

'Grungy' and 'louche' are words that we are applying as the predominant feel of today's collection, which was very 'millionaire creative dips out of the studio for a pint of milk'. With sparkles in his eyes - and on his shirt - this rockstar or painter had a whole wardrobe to soothe his buzzing state of mind: voluminous silk pyjamas, a woollen twin-set comprising a roll-neck and trackpants, striped suits cut from raw wool, loose shirts and oversized jumpers - all with scooped necks. Portrait of an artist in the midst of his opus seemed to be the mood, and Dries Van Noten dressed it well.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Dries Van Noten

'Grungy' and 'louche' are words that we are applying as the predominant feel of today's collection, which was very 'millionaire creative dips out of the studio for a pint of milk'. With sparkles in his eyes - and on his shirt - this rockstar or painter had a whole wardrobe to soothe his buzzing state of mind: voluminous silk pyjamas, a woollen twin-set comprising a roll-neck and trackpants, striped suits cut from raw wool, loose shirts and oversized jumpers - all with scooped necks. Portrait of an artist in the midst of his opus seemed to be the mood, and Dries Van Noten dressed it well.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Dries Van Noten

'Grungy' and 'louche' are words that we are applying as the predominant feel of today's collection, which was very 'millionaire creative dips out of the studio for a pint of milk'. With sparkles in his eyes - and on his shirt - this rockstar or painter had a whole wardrobe to soothe his buzzing state of mind: voluminous silk pyjamas, a woollen twin-set comprising a roll-neck and trackpants, striped suits cut from raw wool, loose shirts and oversized jumpers - all with scooped necks. Portrait of an artist in the midst of his opus seemed to be the mood, and Dries Van Noten dressed it well.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Dries Van Noten

'Grungy' and 'louche' are words that we are applying as the predominant feel of today's collection, which was very 'millionaire creative dips out of the studio for a pint of milk'. With sparkles in his eyes - and on his shirt - this rockstar or painter had a whole wardrobe to soothe his buzzing state of mind: voluminous silk pyjamas, a woollen twin-set comprising a roll-neck and trackpants, striped suits cut from raw wool, loose shirts and oversized jumpers - all with scooped necks. Portrait of an artist in the midst of his opus seemed to be the mood, and Dries Van Noten dressed it well.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Dries Van Noten

'Grungy' and 'louche' are words that we are applying as the predominant feel of today's collection, which was very 'millionaire creative dips out of the studio for a pint of milk'. With sparkles in his eyes - and on his shirt - this rockstar or painter had a whole wardrobe to soothe his buzzing state of mind: voluminous silk pyjamas, a woollen twin-set comprising a roll-neck and trackpants, striped suits cut from raw wool, loose shirts and oversized jumpers - all with scooped necks. Portrait of an artist in the midst of his opus seemed to be the mood, and Dries Van Noten dressed it well.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Junya Watanabe

The main story at Paris Men's is how high technology is being heaped onto existing and ever evolving textiles. Junya Watanabe took a literal yet simplified interpretation, choosing patchwork as a central to his vision. A signature theme of Watanabe's heritage, sure, but the stitched squares over raw cottons and wool visibly contrasted nearly every other collection in Paris - all boasting a seemingly infinite variety of dizzying fabrication techniques. Hints of dockworkers at the turn of the 18th century came by way of Bréton stripes on long sleeved T-Shirts under the baggy suits, all of which would have fitted right in with a crowd scene from Les Misérables. Look closer and there was a story of denim, puffa duffels and plenty of separates. The neat button-down shirts and selection of worker's trousers will definitely strike home with men looking for workhorse classics to add to their casual day-time wardrobe.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Junya Watanabe

The main story at Paris Men's is how high technology is being heaped onto existing and ever evolving textiles. Junya Watanabe took a literal yet simplified interpretation, choosing patchwork as a central to his vision. A signature theme of Watanabe's heritage, sure, but the stitched squares over raw cottons and wool visibly contrasted nearly every other collection in Paris - all boasting a seemingly infinite variety of dizzying fabrication techniques. Hints of dockworkers at the turn of the 18th century came by way of Bréton stripes on long sleeved T-Shirts under the baggy suits, all of which would have fitted right in with a crowd scene from Les Misérables. Look closer and there was a story of denim, puffa duffels and plenty of separates. The neat button-down shirts and selection of worker's trousers will definitely strike home with men looking for workhorse classics to add to their casual day-time wardrobe.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Junya Watanabe

The main story at Paris Men's is how high technology is being heaped onto existing and ever evolving textiles. Junya Watanabe took a literal yet simplified interpretation, choosing patchwork as a central to his vision. A signature theme of Watanabe's heritage, sure, but the stitched squares over raw cottons and wool visibly contrasted nearly every other collection in Paris - all boasting a seemingly infinite variety of dizzying fabrication techniques. Hints of dockworkers at the turn of the 18th century came by way of Bréton stripes on long sleeved T-Shirts under the baggy suits, all of which would have fitted right in with a crowd scene from Les Misérables. Look closer and there was a story of denim, puffa duffels and plenty of separates. The neat button-down shirts and selection of worker's trousers will definitely strike home with men looking for workhorse classics to add to their casual day-time wardrobe.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Junya Watanabe

The main story at Paris Men's is how high technology is being heaped onto existing and ever evolving textiles. Junya Watanabe took a literal yet simplified interpretation, choosing patchwork as a central to his vision. A signature theme of Watanabe's heritage, sure, but the stitched squares over raw cottons and wool visibly contrasted nearly every other collection in Paris - all boasting a seemingly infinite variety of dizzying fabrication techniques. Hints of dockworkers at the turn of the 18th century came by way of Bréton stripes on long sleeved T-Shirts under the baggy suits, all of which would have fitted right in with a crowd scene from Les Misérables. Look closer and there was a story of denim, puffa duffels and plenty of separates. The neat button-down shirts and selection of worker's trousers will definitely strike home with men looking for workhorse classics to add to their casual day-time wardrobe.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Junya Watanabe

The main story at Paris Men's is how high technology is being heaped onto existing and ever evolving textiles. Junya Watanabe took a literal yet simplified interpretation, choosing patchwork as a central to his vision. A signature theme of Watanabe's heritage, sure, but the stitched squares over raw cottons and wool visibly contrasted nearly every other collection in Paris - all boasting a seemingly infinite variety of dizzying fabrication techniques. Hints of dockworkers at the turn of the 18th century came by way of Bréton stripes on long sleeved T-Shirts under the baggy suits, all of which would have fitted right in with a crowd scene from Les Misérables. Look closer and there was a story of denim, puffa duffels and plenty of separates. The neat button-down shirts and selection of worker's trousers will definitely strike home with men looking for workhorse classics to add to their casual day-time wardrobe.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Maison Martin Margiela

Cobalt blue, burnt paprika and deep chestnut were key shades at Maison Martin Margiela today in a collection that played with trompe l’oeil, asymmetrics and the constructing of new garments from vintage items. Amongst all the fuss of buttons moved extra inches to the left or right, extra folds on shirts or shoulder constructions repositioned to the front of the body came, surprisingly, a serene fellow. Donning a luxurious, maxi-sized overcoat over a roomy suit and roll-neck jumper, he strolled down the runway with relaxed confidence. If the Margiela studio had worried about stitching together sourced fishermen's beanies or choosing fur from thrift stores to make something entirely new, the Margiela man on the runway was a cool, unhampered gentleman simply going about his day.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Maison Martin Margiela

Cobalt blue, burnt paprika and deep chestnut were key shades at Maison Martin Margiela today in a collection that played with trompe l’oeil, asymmetrics and the constructing of new garments from vintage items. Amongst all the fuss of buttons moved extra inches to the left or right, extra folds on shirts or shoulder constructions repositioned to the front of the body came, surprisingly, a serene fellow. Donning a luxurious, maxi-sized overcoat over a roomy suit and roll-neck jumper, he strolled down the runway with relaxed confidence. If the Margiela studio had worried about stitching together sourced fishermen's beanies or choosing fur from thrift stores to make something entirely new, the Margiela man on the runway was a cool, unhampered gentleman simply going about his day.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Maison Martin Margiela

Cobalt blue, burnt paprika and deep chestnut were key shades at Maison Martin Margiela today in a collection that played with trompe l’oeil, asymmetrics and the constructing of new garments from vintage items. Amongst all the fuss of buttons moved extra inches to the left or right, extra folds on shirts or shoulder constructions repositioned to the front of the body came, surprisingly, a serene fellow. Donning a luxurious, maxi-sized overcoat over a roomy suit and roll-neck jumper, he strolled down the runway with relaxed confidence. If the Margiela studio had worried about stitching together sourced fishermen's beanies or choosing fur from thrift stores to make something entirely new, the Margiela man on the runway was a cool, unhampered gentleman simply going about his day.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Maison Martin Margiela

Cobalt blue, burnt paprika and deep chestnut were key shades at Maison Martin Margiela today in a collection that played with trompe l’oeil, asymmetrics and the constructing of new garments from vintage items. Amongst all the fuss of buttons moved extra inches to the left or right, extra folds on shirts or shoulder constructions repositioned to the front of the body came, surprisingly, a serene fellow. Donning a luxurious, maxi-sized overcoat over a roomy suit and roll-neck jumper, he strolled down the runway with relaxed confidence. If the Margiela studio had worried about stitching together sourced fishermen's beanies or choosing fur from thrift stores to make something entirely new, the Margiela man on the runway was a cool, unhampered gentleman simply going about his day.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Maison Martin Margiela

Cobalt blue, burnt paprika and deep chestnut were key shades at Maison Martin Margiela today in a collection that played with trompe l’oeil, asymmetrics and the constructing of new garments from vintage items. Amongst all the fuss of buttons moved extra inches to the left or right, extra folds on shirts or shoulder constructions repositioned to the front of the body came, surprisingly, a serene fellow. Donning a luxurious, maxi-sized overcoat over a roomy suit and roll-neck jumper, he strolled down the runway with relaxed confidence. If the Margiela studio had worried about stitching together sourced fishermen's beanies or choosing fur from thrift stores to make something entirely new, the Margiela man on the runway was a cool, unhampered gentleman simply going about his day.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Kris Van Assche

‘Choose life’ was the slogan on the invitation to the Kris Van Assche show, while ‘Rugged, Rough’n’Tough’ was the slogan on the hoodies. Modern life is complicated and in his show-notes the Belgian designer discussed the complex relationship between the hopes and ideals of every boy and the reality of growing up into a man. Men are obliged to wear the same basics, the same sartorial codes, he argued, so why not keep the freedom and dreams of your youth with you? Indeed this collection was youthful and playful, much like a group of lads rucking in the schoolyard. This playfulness was brought into adulthood as suits, ties and boardroom overcoats emblazoned with the slogans from the Kris Van Assche college of cool.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Kris Van Assche

‘Choose life’ was the slogan on the invitation to the Kris Van Assche show, while ‘Rugged, Rough’n’Tough’ was the slogan on the hoodies. Modern life is complicated and in his show-notes the Belgian designer discussed the complex relationship between the hopes and ideals of every boy and the reality of growing up into a man. Men are obliged to wear the same basics, the same sartorial codes, he argued, so why not keep the freedom and dreams of your youth with you? Indeed this collection was youthful and playful, much like a group of lads rucking in the schoolyard. This playfulness was brought into adulthood as suits, ties and boardroom overcoats emblazoned with the slogans from the Kris Van Assche college of cool.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Kris Van Assche

‘Choose life’ was the slogan on the invitation to the Kris Van Assche show, while ‘Rugged, Rough’n’Tough’ was the slogan on the hoodies. Modern life is complicated and in his show-notes the Belgian designer discussed the complex relationship between the hopes and ideals of every boy and the reality of growing up into a man. Men are obliged to wear the same basics, the same sartorial codes, he argued, so why not keep the freedom and dreams of your youth with you? Indeed this collection was youthful and playful, much like a group of lads rucking in the schoolyard. This playfulness was brought into adulthood as suits, ties and boardroom overcoats emblazoned with the slogans from the Kris Van Assche college of cool.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Kris Van Assche

‘Choose life’ was the slogan on the invitation to the Kris Van Assche show, while ‘Rugged, Rough’n’Tough’ was the slogan on the hoodies. Modern life is complicated and in his show-notes the Belgian designer discussed the complex relationship between the hopes and ideals of every boy and the reality of growing up into a man. Men are obliged to wear the same basics, the same sartorial codes, he argued, so why not keep the freedom and dreams of your youth with you? Indeed this collection was youthful and playful, much like a group of lads rucking in the schoolyard. This playfulness was brought into adulthood as suits, ties and boardroom overcoats emblazoned with the slogans from the Kris Van Assche college of cool.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Kris Van Assche

‘Choose life’ was the slogan on the invitation to the Kris Van Assche show, while ‘Rugged, Rough’n’Tough’ was the slogan on the hoodies. Modern life is complicated and in his show-notes the Belgian designer discussed the complex relationship between the hopes and ideals of every boy and the reality of growing up into a man. Men are obliged to wear the same basics, the same sartorial codes, he argued, so why not keep the freedom and dreams of your youth with you? Indeed this collection was youthful and playful, much like a group of lads rucking in the schoolyard. This playfulness was brought into adulthood as suits, ties and boardroom overcoats emblazoned with the slogans from the Kris Van Assche college of cool.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Comme des Garçons

Youth and innocence was clearly on Rei Kawakubo's mind as boys with long blonde curls wore Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny hats (made by Stephen Jones) and clothes made of baby pastels reminiscent of the Meadham Kirchhoff palette and its edgy eeriness. Stripping away all the sartorial puzzles and games, a very accessible look stepped forward: soft drop-crotch trousers, and button-down shirts embroidered with mini pom pom trims and high-top sneakers, all in nursery school shades. When the lights dropped, music stopped and black suits entered, it felt like adulthood was being interpreted as a foreboding storm. Change came however with a woolly cardigan embroidered with tiny clouds and behind this returned looks in a rainbow hue of even brighter colours with more pom poms and clown shoes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Comme des Garçons

Youth and innocence was clearly on Rei Kawakubo's mind as boys with long blonde curls wore Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny hats (made by Stephen Jones) and clothes made of baby pastels reminiscent of the Meadham Kirchhoff palette and its edgy eeriness. Stripping away all the sartorial puzzles and games, a very accessible look stepped forward: soft drop-crotch trousers, and button-down shirts embroidered with mini pom pom trims and high-top sneakers, all in nursery school shades. When the lights dropped, music stopped and black suits entered, it felt like adulthood was being interpreted as a foreboding storm. Change came however with a woolly cardigan embroidered with tiny clouds and behind this returned looks in a rainbow hue of even brighter colours with more pom poms and clown shoes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Comme des Garçons

Youth and innocence was clearly on Rei Kawakubo's mind as boys with long blonde curls wore Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny hats (made by Stephen Jones) and clothes made of baby pastels reminiscent of the Meadham Kirchhoff palette and its edgy eeriness. Stripping away all the sartorial puzzles and games, a very accessible look stepped forward: soft drop-crotch trousers, and button-down shirts embroidered with mini pom pom trims and high-top sneakers, all in nursery school shades. When the lights dropped, music stopped and black suits entered, it felt like adulthood was being interpreted as a foreboding storm. Change came however with a woolly cardigan embroidered with tiny clouds and behind this returned looks in a rainbow hue of even brighter colours with more pom poms and clown shoes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Comme des Garçons

Youth and innocence was clearly on Rei Kawakubo's mind as boys with long blonde curls wore Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny hats (made by Stephen Jones) and clothes made of baby pastels reminiscent of the Meadham Kirchhoff palette and its edgy eeriness. Stripping away all the sartorial puzzles and games, a very accessible look stepped forward: soft drop-crotch trousers, and button-down shirts embroidered with mini pom pom trims and high-top sneakers, all in nursery school shades. When the lights dropped, music stopped and black suits entered, it felt like adulthood was being interpreted as a foreboding storm. Change came however with a woolly cardigan embroidered with tiny clouds and behind this returned looks in a rainbow hue of even brighter colours with more pom poms and clown shoes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Comme des Garçons

Youth and innocence was clearly on Rei Kawakubo's mind as boys with long blonde curls wore Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny hats (made by Stephen Jones) and clothes made of baby pastels reminiscent of the Meadham Kirchhoff palette and its edgy eeriness. Stripping away all the sartorial puzzles and games, a very accessible look stepped forward: soft drop-crotch trousers, and button-down shirts embroidered with mini pom pom trims and high-top sneakers, all in nursery school shades. When the lights dropped, music stopped and black suits entered, it felt like adulthood was being interpreted as a foreboding storm. Change came however with a woolly cardigan embroidered with tiny clouds and behind this returned looks in a rainbow hue of even brighter colours with more pom poms and clown shoes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Givenchy

Riccardo Tisci's showcase for Givenchy featured the most exciting model casting of the Paris season, but before his models were unleashed on the catwalk, Tisci set the scene and cleansed his viewer's palette by laying down a giant circle of candles in a huge, darkened warehouse space. With the distinctly spiritual overtone (a séance? Givenchy ouija board session?), anticipation was high as a section of candles was removed to open the walkway for the models who finally strode into the eerie light like gladiators. One of the first Givenchy warriors had a pentagram shape on his sweatshirt. Other models strode onto the runway with what resembled American football protective padding - actually made from laced cashmere wool. More sweatshirts came screen-printed with emotive and homoerotic visuals in black, white and grey. Strip away all of the styled elements however and underneath this collection was a foundation of the sharp Givenchy suit, most striking was the black collarless option paired with a sharp white tie and equally albino shirt that came with metal pins on each collar.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Givenchy

Riccardo Tisci's showcase for Givenchy featured the most exciting model casting of the Paris season, but before his models were unleashed on the catwalk, Tisci set the scene and cleansed his viewer's palette by laying down a giant circle of candles in a huge, darkened warehouse space. With the distinctly spiritual overtone (a séance? Givenchy ouija board session?), anticipation was high as a section of candles was removed to open the walkway for the models who finally strode into the eerie light like gladiators. One of the first Givenchy warriors had a pentagram shape on his sweatshirt. Other models strode onto the runway with what resembled American football protective padding - actually made from laced cashmere wool. More sweatshirts came screen-printed with emotive and homoerotic visuals in black, white and grey. Strip away all of the styled elements however and underneath this collection was a foundation of the sharp Givenchy suit, most striking was the black collarless option paired with a sharp white tie and equally albino shirt that came with metal pins on each collar.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Givenchy

Riccardo Tisci's showcase for Givenchy featured the most exciting model casting of the Paris season, but before his models were unleashed on the catwalk, Tisci set the scene and cleansed his viewer's palette by laying down a giant circle of candles in a huge, darkened warehouse space. With the distinctly spiritual overtone (a séance? Givenchy ouija board session?), anticipation was high as a section of candles was removed to open the walkway for the models who finally strode into the eerie light like gladiators. One of the first Givenchy warriors had a pentagram shape on his sweatshirt. Other models strode onto the runway with what resembled American football protective padding - actually made from laced cashmere wool. More sweatshirts came screen-printed with emotive and homoerotic visuals in black, white and grey. Strip away all of the styled elements however and underneath this collection was a foundation of the sharp Givenchy suit, most striking was the black collarless option paired with a sharp white tie and equally albino shirt that came with metal pins on each collar.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Givenchy

Riccardo Tisci's showcase for Givenchy featured the most exciting model casting of the Paris season, but before his models were unleashed on the catwalk, Tisci set the scene and cleansed his viewer's palette by laying down a giant circle of candles in a huge, darkened warehouse space. With the distinctly spiritual overtone (a séance? Givenchy ouija board session?), anticipation was high as a section of candles was removed to open the walkway for the models who finally strode into the eerie light like gladiators. One of the first Givenchy warriors had a pentagram shape on his sweatshirt. Other models strode onto the runway with what resembled American football protective padding - actually made from laced cashmere wool. More sweatshirts came screen-printed with emotive and homoerotic visuals in black, white and grey. Strip away all of the styled elements however and underneath this collection was a foundation of the sharp Givenchy suit, most striking was the black collarless option paired with a sharp white tie and equally albino shirt that came with metal pins on each collar.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Givenchy

Riccardo Tisci's showcase for Givenchy featured the most exciting model casting of the Paris season, but before his models were unleashed on the catwalk, Tisci set the scene and cleansed his viewer's palette by laying down a giant circle of candles in a huge, darkened warehouse space. With the distinctly spiritual overtone (a séance? Givenchy ouija board session?), anticipation was high as a section of candles was removed to open the walkway for the models who finally strode into the eerie light like gladiators. One of the first Givenchy warriors had a pentagram shape on his sweatshirt. Other models strode onto the runway with what resembled American football protective padding - actually made from laced cashmere wool. More sweatshirts came screen-printed with emotive and homoerotic visuals in black, white and grey. Strip away all of the styled elements however and underneath this collection was a foundation of the sharp Givenchy suit, most striking was the black collarless option paired with a sharp white tie and equally albino shirt that came with metal pins on each collar.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Berluti

Nothing was quite as it seemed at the Berluti presentation. As we stopped to touch and enquire after the materials, it was revealed that leather had been washed and treated to give it the texture and appearance of waxed cotton, cashmere felt was ‘punched’ with angora and alpaca was treated so that a new texture was born. According to this season in Paris, everything is hyper technical and the relationship between the pioneering man and the pioneering textiles he wears could never be more literal. Built on a solid founding stone of grey suits, the Berluti man looks to the future with a wardrobe that builds on blending sporty elements with luxury fabrics at level of complexity never before reached.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Berluti

Nothing was quite as it seemed at the Berluti presentation. As we stopped to touch and enquire after the materials, it was revealed that leather had been washed and treated to give it the texture and appearance of waxed cotton, cashmere felt was ‘punched’ with angora and alpaca was treated so that a new texture was born. According to this season in Paris, everything is hyper technical and the relationship between the pioneering man and the pioneering textiles he wears could never be more literal. Built on a solid founding stone of grey suits, the Berluti man looks to the future with a wardrobe that builds on blending sporty elements with luxury fabrics at level of complexity never before reached.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Berluti

Nothing was quite as it seemed at the Berluti presentation. As we stopped to touch and enquire after the materials, it was revealed that leather had been washed and treated to give it the texture and appearance of waxed cotton, cashmere felt was ‘punched’ with angora and alpaca was treated so that a new texture was born. According to this season in Paris, everything is hyper technical and the relationship between the pioneering man and the pioneering textiles he wears could never be more literal. Built on a solid founding stone of grey suits, the Berluti man looks to the future with a wardrobe that builds on blending sporty elements with luxury fabrics at level of complexity never before reached.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Berluti

Nothing was quite as it seemed at the Berluti presentation. As we stopped to touch and enquire after the materials, it was revealed that leather had been washed and treated to give it the texture and appearance of waxed cotton, cashmere felt was ‘punched’ with angora and alpaca was treated so that a new texture was born. According to this season in Paris, everything is hyper technical and the relationship between the pioneering man and the pioneering textiles he wears could never be more literal. Built on a solid founding stone of grey suits, the Berluti man looks to the future with a wardrobe that builds on blending sporty elements with luxury fabrics at level of complexity never before reached.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Berluti

Nothing was quite as it seemed at the Berluti presentation. As we stopped to touch and enquire after the materials, it was revealed that leather had been washed and treated to give it the texture and appearance of waxed cotton, cashmere felt was ‘punched’ with angora and alpaca was treated so that a new texture was born. According to this season in Paris, everything is hyper technical and the relationship between the pioneering man and the pioneering textiles he wears could never be more literal. Built on a solid founding stone of grey suits, the Berluti man looks to the future with a wardrobe that builds on blending sporty elements with luxury fabrics at level of complexity never before reached.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Dior Homme

To the booming bass-lines of Anne Clarke's 'Our Darkness',  models strode at a robotic pace across a pristine white runway that extended up onto stairs and over the heads of the audience. On this endless march, each two-piece suit was as minimal as the next, making it feel like Kris Van Assche was resetting his own creative watch to zero. The designer stripped everything back to a sleek, slim silhouette, free of frivolous fripperies, such as fastenings. It was a touch Kubrick's Space Odyssey 2001 - or Star Trek, some might add.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay
 

Dior Homme

To the booming bass-lines of Anne Clarke's 'Our Darkness',  models strode at a robotic pace across a pristine white runway that extended up onto stairs and over the heads of the audience. On this endless march, each two-piece suit was as minimal as the next, making it feel like Kris Van Assche was resetting his own creative watch to zero. The designer stripped everything back to a sleek, slim silhouette, free of frivolous fripperies, such as fastenings. It was a touch Kubrick's Space Odyssey 2001 - or Star Trek, some might add.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Dior Homme

To the booming bass-lines of Anne Clarke's 'Our Darkness',  models strode at a robotic pace across a pristine white runway that extended up onto stairs and over the heads of the audience. On this endless march, each two-piece suit was as minimal as the next, making it feel like Kris Van Assche was resetting his own creative watch to zero. The designer stripped everything back to a sleek, slim silhouette, free of frivolous fripperies, such as fastenings. It was a touch Kubrick's Space Odyssey 2001 - or Star Trek, some might add.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Dior Homme

To the booming bass-lines of Anne Clarke's 'Our Darkness',  models strode at a robotic pace across a pristine white runway that extended up onto stairs and over the heads of the audience. On this endless march, each two-piece suit was as minimal as the next, making it feel like Kris Van Assche was resetting his own creative watch to zero. The designer stripped everything back to a sleek, slim silhouette, free of frivolous fripperies, such as fastenings. It was a touch Kubrick's Space Odyssey 2001 - or Star Trek, some might add.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Dior Homme

To the booming bass-lines of Anne Clarke's 'Our Darkness',  models strode at a robotic pace across a pristine white runway that extended up onto stairs and over the heads of the audience. On this endless march, each two-piece suit was as minimal as the next, making it feel like Kris Van Assche was resetting his own creative watch to zero. The designer stripped everything back to a sleek, slim silhouette, free of frivolous fripperies, such as fastenings. It was a touch Kubrick's Space Odyssey 2001 - or Star Trek, some might add.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Miharayasuhiro

Miharayasuhiro braved zero temperatures, hosting his show outdoors as snow fell across Paris. The collection proposed suits etched with the designer's own vision of what the modern man is looking for. The key elements were as follows: dark suits with a camouflage flourish on the underside of upturned collars; suits entirely covered by a carp fish print, rendered sparkly by gold embroidery; and snakeskin Dr. Marten-esque shoes. A giant drum was pounded by two Japanese musicians who sweated in the glow of freezing lamplight, while models walked serenely through the cold, dark night. A real highlight came in the form of a puffa jacket covered in knitted wool. Not one person present in the audience can have wished for anything more.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Miharayasuhiro

Miharayasuhiro braved zero temperatures, hosting his show outdoors as snow fell across Paris. The collection proposed suits etched with the designer's own vision of what the modern man is looking for. The key elements were as follows: dark suits with a camouflage flourish on the underside of upturned collars; suits entirely covered by a carp fish print, rendered sparkly by gold embroidery; and snakeskin Dr. Marten-esque shoes. A giant drum was pounded by two Japanese musicians who sweated in the glow of freezing lamplight, while models walked serenely through the cold, dark night. A real highlight came in the form of a puffa jacket covered in knitted wool. Not one person present in the audience can have wished for anything more.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Miharayasuhiro

Miharayasuhiro braved zero temperatures, hosting his show outdoors as snow fell across Paris. The collection proposed suits etched with the designer's own vision of what the modern man is looking for. The key elements were as follows: dark suits with a camouflage flourish on the underside of upturned collars; suits entirely covered by a carp fish print, rendered sparkly by gold embroidery; and snakeskin Dr. Marten-esque shoes. A giant drum was pounded by two Japanese musicians who sweated in the glow of freezing lamplight, while models walked serenely through the cold, dark night. A real highlight came in the form of a puffa jacket covered in knitted wool. Not one person present in the audience can have wished for anything more.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Miharayasuhiro

Miharayasuhiro braved zero temperatures, hosting his show outdoors as snow fell across Paris. The collection proposed suits etched with the designer's own vision of what the modern man is looking for. The key elements were as follows: dark suits with a camouflage flourish on the underside of upturned collars; suits entirely covered by a carp fish print, rendered sparkly by gold embroidery; and snakeskin Dr. Marten-esque shoes. A giant drum was pounded by two Japanese musicians who sweated in the glow of freezing lamplight, while models walked serenely through the cold, dark night. A real highlight came in the form of a puffa jacket covered in knitted wool. Not one person present in the audience can have wished for anything more.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Miharayasuhiro

Miharayasuhiro braved zero temperatures, hosting his show outdoors as snow fell across Paris. The collection proposed suits etched with the designer's own vision of what the modern man is looking for. The key elements were as follows: dark suits with a camouflage flourish on the underside of upturned collars; suits entirely covered by a carp fish print, rendered sparkly by gold embroidery; and snakeskin Dr. Marten-esque shoes. A giant drum was pounded by two Japanese musicians who sweated in the glow of freezing lamplight, while models walked serenely through the cold, dark night. A real highlight came in the form of a puffa jacket covered in knitted wool. Not one person present in the audience can have wished for anything more.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Damir Doma

Volume and textiles were at play in the collection of Damir Doma, the Croatian designer who has just opened a store on the prime real estate spot of Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré - an ambitious move for such a young, independent designer. Many assume Doma is caught in a love affair with dark colours and a gothic aesthetic, but the designer has been widening his vision of late. Drop-crotch baggy trousers, pin-striped cotton shirts and boiled wool jackets opened the show, followed by collarless cotton jumpsuits. Ski knits were a theme on beanies and body-hugging, long-sleeved vests which seeped into his finale of black dinner suits, fit for the man who likes to mix things up.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Damir Doma

Volume and textiles were at play in the collection of Damir Doma, the Croatian designer who has just opened a store on the prime real estate spot of Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré - an ambitious move for such a young, independent designer. Many assume Doma is caught in a love affair with dark colours and a gothic aesthetic, but the designer has been widening his vision of late. Drop-crotch baggy trousers, pin-striped cotton shirts and boiled wool jackets opened the show, followed by collarless cotton jumpsuits. Ski knits were a theme on beanies and body-hugging, long-sleeved vests which seeped into his finale of black dinner suits, fit for the man who likes to mix things up.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Damir Doma

Volume and textiles were at play in the collection of Damir Doma, the Croatian designer who has just opened a store on the prime real estate spot of Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré - an ambitious move for such a young, independent designer. Many assume Doma is caught in a love affair with dark colours and a gothic aesthetic, but the designer has been widening his vision of late. Drop-crotch baggy trousers, pin-striped cotton shirts and boiled wool jackets opened the show, followed by collarless cotton jumpsuits. Ski knits were a theme on beanies and body-hugging, long-sleeved vests which seeped into his finale of black dinner suits, fit for the man who likes to mix things up.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Damir Doma

Volume and textiles were at play in the collection of Damir Doma, the Croatian designer who has just opened a store on the prime real estate spot of Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré - an ambitious move for such a young, independent designer. Many assume Doma is caught in a love affair with dark colours and a gothic aesthetic, but the designer has been widening his vision of late. Drop-crotch baggy trousers, pin-striped cotton shirts and boiled wool jackets opened the show, followed by collarless cotton jumpsuits. Ski knits were a theme on beanies and body-hugging, long-sleeved vests which seeped into his finale of black dinner suits, fit for the man who likes to mix things up.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Damir Doma

Volume and textiles were at play in the collection of Damir Doma, the Croatian designer who has just opened a store on the prime real estate spot of Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré - an ambitious move for such a young, independent designer. Many assume Doma is caught in a love affair with dark colours and a gothic aesthetic, but the designer has been widening his vision of late. Drop-crotch baggy trousers, pin-striped cotton shirts and boiled wool jackets opened the show, followed by collarless cotton jumpsuits. Ski knits were a theme on beanies and body-hugging, long-sleeved vests which seeped into his finale of black dinner suits, fit for the man who likes to mix things up.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Hermès

Textile technology has been taken to new heights during Paris Men's week - never assume that the material you see or touch is what you first believe it to be. French luxury brand Hermès has always been a pioneer in this arena, seeking the softest, strongest, sleekest and (dare we say) geekiest in textile advances. From this starting point, it crafts a solid silhouette, often slim and pert, and always chic. The Hermès man is understated and the quality of his threads never goes amiss. Today creative director Véronique Nichanian continued her groove of modern cuts with a splash of colour, this season a delicious raspberry and primrose yellow that blends seamlessly with her duffle coats and bomber jackets and, of course, hand-held luggage.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Hermès

Textile technology has been taken to new heights during Paris Men's week - never assume that the material you see or touch is what you first believe it to be. French luxury brand Hermès has always been a pioneer in this arena, seeking the softest, strongest, sleekest and (dare we say) geekiest in textile advances. From this starting point, it crafts a solid silhouette, often slim and pert, and always chic. The Hermès man is understated and the quality of his threads never goes amiss. Today creative director Véronique Nichanian continued her groove of modern cuts with a splash of colour, this season a delicious raspberry and primrose yellow that blends seamlessly with her duffle coats and bomber jackets and, of course, hand-held luggage.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Hermès

Textile technology has been taken to new heights during Paris Men's week - never assume that the material you see or touch is what you first believe it to be. French luxury brand Hermès has always been a pioneer in this arena, seeking the softest, strongest, sleekest and (dare we say) geekiest in textile advances. From this starting point, it crafts a solid silhouette, often slim and pert, and always chic. The Hermès man is understated and the quality of his threads never goes amiss. Today creative director Véronique Nichanian continued her groove of modern cuts with a splash of colour, this season a delicious raspberry and primrose yellow that blends seamlessly with her duffle coats and bomber jackets and, of course, hand-held luggage.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Hermès

Textile technology has been taken to new heights during Paris Men's week - never assume that the material you see or touch is what you first believe it to be. French luxury brand Hermès has always been a pioneer in this arena, seeking the softest, strongest, sleekest and (dare we say) geekiest in textile advances. From this starting point, it crafts a solid silhouette, often slim and pert, and always chic. The Hermès man is understated and the quality of his threads never goes amiss. Today creative director Véronique Nichanian continued her groove of modern cuts with a splash of colour, this season a delicious raspberry and primrose yellow that blends seamlessly with her duffle coats and bomber jackets and, of course, hand-held luggage.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Hermès

Textile technology has been taken to new heights during Paris Men's week - never assume that the material you see or touch is what you first believe it to be. French luxury brand Hermès has always been a pioneer in this arena, seeking the softest, strongest, sleekest and (dare we say) geekiest in textile advances. From this starting point, it crafts a solid silhouette, often slim and pert, and always chic. The Hermès man is understated and the quality of his threads never goes amiss. Today creative director Véronique Nichanian continued her groove of modern cuts with a splash of colour, this season a delicious raspberry and primrose yellow that blends seamlessly with her duffle coats and bomber jackets and, of course, hand-held luggage.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Ami

Ami designed by Alexandre Mattiussi may only be a young brand in its third season but it already has a strong customer base, with designers such as Joseph Altuzarra and Nicolas Ghesquiére known to be fans. Mattuissi makes unfussy classics for the modern guy, demonstrated today by the mise-en-scène which was the Paris subway. Models walked and stood in the set as if they were travelling to and from work or perhaps out to see friends, and the feeling was casual. Raw denim and a seemingly infinite variety on the Aviator jacket entered from off-stage and Mattiussi's motif this season was a thick black and white zigzag that came printed onto jeans, thick woolly scarves and overcoats.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Ami

Ami designed by Alexandre Mattiussi may only be a young brand in its third season but it already has a strong customer base, with designers such as Joseph Altuzarra and Nicolas Ghesquiére known to be fans. Mattuissi makes unfussy classics for the modern guy, demonstrated today by the mise-en-scène which was the Paris subway. Models walked and stood in the set as if they were travelling to and from work or perhaps out to see friends, and the feeling was casual. Raw denim and a seemingly infinite variety on the Aviator jacket entered from off-stage and Mattiussi's motif this season was a thick black and white zigzag that came printed onto jeans, thick woolly scarves and overcoats.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Ami

Ami designed by Alexandre Mattiussi may only be a young brand in its third season but it already has a strong customer base, with designers such as Joseph Altuzarra and Nicolas Ghesquiére known to be fans. Mattuissi makes unfussy classics for the modern guy, demonstrated today by the mise-en-scène which was the Paris subway. Models walked and stood in the set as if they were travelling to and from work or perhaps out to see friends, and the feeling was casual. Raw denim and a seemingly infinite variety on the Aviator jacket entered from off-stage and Mattiussi's motif this season was a thick black and white zigzag that came printed onto jeans, thick woolly scarves and overcoats.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Ami

Ami designed by Alexandre Mattiussi may only be a young brand in its third season but it already has a strong customer base, with designers such as Joseph Altuzarra and Nicolas Ghesquiére known to be fans. Mattuissi makes unfussy classics for the modern guy, demonstrated today by the mise-en-scène which was the Paris subway. Models walked and stood in the set as if they were travelling to and from work or perhaps out to see friends, and the feeling was casual. Raw denim and a seemingly infinite variety on the Aviator jacket entered from off-stage and Mattiussi's motif this season was a thick black and white zigzag that came printed onto jeans, thick woolly scarves and overcoats.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Ami

Ami designed by Alexandre Mattiussi may only be a young brand in its third season but it already has a strong customer base, with designers such as Joseph Altuzarra and Nicolas Ghesquiére known to be fans. Mattuissi makes unfussy classics for the modern guy, demonstrated today by the mise-en-scène which was the Paris subway. Models walked and stood in the set as if they were travelling to and from work or perhaps out to see friends, and the feeling was casual. Raw denim and a seemingly infinite variety on the Aviator jacket entered from off-stage and Mattiussi's motif this season was a thick black and white zigzag that came printed onto jeans, thick woolly scarves and overcoats.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Lanvin

Across the board, nearly all of the French houses have proposed a great pair of trainers and today Lanvin followed suit, offering its hiking hybrid in five different colours. Headed up by Lucas Ossendriver and Alber Elbaz, the French house also offered variations on its version of the oversized mid-length coat. Proportions on buttons and lapels were pumped up along with sleeves, all of which was exaggerated or highlighted by the very slim-line form of ties, shirt collars and trousers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Lanvin

Across the board, nearly all of the French houses have proposed a great pair of trainers and today Lanvin followed suit, offering its hiking hybrid in five different colours. Headed up by Lucas Ossendriver and Alber Elbaz, the French house also offered variations on its version of the oversized mid-length coat. Proportions on buttons and lapels were pumped up along with sleeves, all of which was exaggerated or highlighted by the very slim-line form of ties, shirt collars and trousers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

 

Lanvin

Across the board, nearly all of the French houses have proposed a great pair of trainers and today Lanvin followed suit, offering its hiking hybrid in five different colours. Headed up by Lucas Ossendriver and Alber Elbaz, the French house also offered variations on its version of the oversized mid-length coat. Proportions on buttons and lapels were pumped up along with sleeves, all of which was exaggerated or highlighted by the very slim-line form of ties, shirt collars and trousers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

 

Lanvin

Across the board, nearly all of the French houses have proposed a great pair of trainers and today Lanvin followed suit, offering its hiking hybrid in five different colours. Headed up by Lucas Ossendriver and Alber Elbaz, the French house also offered variations on its version of the oversized mid-length coat. Proportions on buttons and lapels were pumped up along with sleeves, all of which was exaggerated or highlighted by the very slim-line form of ties, shirt collars and trousers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

 

Lanvin

Across the board, nearly all of the French houses have proposed a great pair of trainers and today Lanvin followed suit, offering its hiking hybrid in five different colours. Headed up by Lucas Ossendriver and Alber Elbaz, the French house also offered variations on its version of the oversized mid-length coat. Proportions on buttons and lapels were pumped up along with sleeves, all of which was exaggerated or highlighted by the very slim-line form of ties, shirt collars and trousers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

 

Paul Smith

Amongst the starry cast of models at Paul Smith, French man of the moment Clément Chabernaud had brought his grandmother along to see him walk the runway show. She, like all of Smith's guests, saw well over thirty looks that came in a sultry colour palette of Prussian green, burgundy and dark absinthe. Smith toyed with the dog-tooth motif by enlarging it on his take of the maxi-overcoat, and multi layering the print on shirt and tie combinations. Rock 'n' roll is always the mainstay of a Paul Smith collection but today the British designer - who was recently in Paris to open a new store in Saint Germain, chose to concentrate more on the wardrobe of the smarter lad - so there were no strung out musician types here today.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Paul Smith

Amongst the starry cast of models at Paul Smith, French man of the moment Clément Chabernaud had brought his grandmother along to see him walk the runway show. She, like all of Smith's guests, saw well over thirty looks that came in a sultry colour palette of Prussian green, burgundy and dark absinthe. Smith toyed with the dog-tooth motif by enlarging it on his take of the maxi-overcoat, and multi layering the print on shirt and tie combinations. Rock 'n' roll is always the mainstay of a Paul Smith collection but today the British designer - who was recently in Paris to open a new store in Saint Germain, chose to concentrate more on the wardrobe of the smarter lad - so there were no strung out musician types here today.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

 

Paul Smith

Amongst the starry cast of models at Paul Smith, French man of the moment Clément Chabernaud had brought his grandmother along to see him walk the runway show. She, like all of Smith's guests, saw well over thirty looks that came in a sultry colour palette of Prussian green, burgundy and dark absinthe. Smith toyed with the dog-tooth motif by enlarging it on his take of the maxi-overcoat, and multi layering the print on shirt and tie combinations. Rock 'n' roll is always the mainstay of a Paul Smith collection but today the British designer - who was recently in Paris to open a new store in Saint Germain, chose to concentrate more on the wardrobe of the smarter lad - so there were no strung out musician types here today.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

 

Paul Smith

Amongst the starry cast of models at Paul Smith, French man of the moment Clément Chabernaud had brought his grandmother along to see him walk the runway show. She, like all of Smith's guests, saw well over thirty looks that came in a sultry colour palette of Prussian green, burgundy and dark absinthe. Smith toyed with the dog-tooth motif by enlarging it on his take of the maxi-overcoat, and multi layering the print on shirt and tie combinations. Rock 'n' roll is always the mainstay of a Paul Smith collection but today the British designer - who was recently in Paris to open a new store in Saint Germain, chose to concentrate more on the wardrobe of the smarter lad - so there were no strung out musician types here today.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

 

Paul Smith

Amongst the starry cast of models at Paul Smith, French man of the moment Clément Chabernaud had brought his grandmother along to see him walk the runway show. She, like all of Smith's guests, saw well over thirty looks that came in a sultry colour palette of Prussian green, burgundy and dark absinthe. Smith toyed with the dog-tooth motif by enlarging it on his take of the maxi-overcoat, and multi layering the print on shirt and tie combinations. Rock 'n' roll is always the mainstay of a Paul Smith collection but today the British designer - who was recently in Paris to open a new store in Saint Germain, chose to concentrate more on the wardrobe of the smarter lad - so there were no strung out musician types here today.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

 

Saint Laurent

The anticipation was palpable as audience members including fashion designer Azzedine Alaïa gathered inside Le Grand Palais to see the new menswear collection by Hedi Slimane. The room darkened and huge speakers on a gigantic spinning structure that resembled a fairground ride began to spin, sending out the guitar riffs of a garage rock soundtrack. The androgynous collection that followed directly reflected the spirit of rock 'n' roll and one that seemed pegged for a younger crowd - unlike that of Slimane's womenswear collection, which felt more like high luxury and for an audience who were thirty and above. Skinny leather jeans came with thick, baggy jumpers accessorised with animal print scarves. Ripped denim jeans rocked down the runway too which Slimane populated with boys and girls, and it was often purposefully hard to tell which was which. Overall the look was very British and incredibly reminiscent of the cool and grungy kids in skinny jeans and suit jackets who hung out at The Good Mixer Pub in Camden around 2004.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Saint Laurent

The anticipation was palpable as audience members including fashion designer Azzedine Alaïa gathered inside Le Grand Palais to see the new menswear collection by Hedi Slimane. The room darkened and huge speakers on a gigantic spinning structure that resembled a fairground ride began to spin, sending out the guitar riffs of a garage rock soundtrack. The androgynous collection that followed directly reflected the spirit of rock 'n' roll and one that seemed pegged for a younger crowd - unlike that of Slimane's womenswear collection, which felt more like high luxury and for an audience who were thirty and above. Skinny leather jeans came with thick, baggy jumpers accessorised with animal print scarves. Ripped denim jeans rocked down the runway too which Slimane populated with boys and girls, and it was often purposefully hard to tell which was which. Overall the look was very British and incredibly reminiscent of the cool and grungy kids in skinny jeans and suit jackets who hung out at The Good Mixer Pub in Camden around 2004.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Saint Laurent

The anticipation was palpable as audience members including fashion designer Azzedine Alaïa gathered inside Le Grand Palais to see the new menswear collection by Hedi Slimane. The room darkened and huge speakers on a gigantic spinning structure that resembled a fairground ride began to spin, sending out the guitar riffs of a garage rock soundtrack. The androgynous collection that followed directly reflected the spirit of rock 'n' roll and one that seemed pegged for a younger crowd - unlike that of Slimane's womenswear collection, which felt more like high luxury and for an audience who were thirty and above. Skinny leather jeans came with thick, baggy jumpers accessorised with animal print scarves. Ripped denim jeans rocked down the runway too which Slimane populated with boys and girls, and it was often purposefully hard to tell which was which. Overall the look was very British and incredibly reminiscent of the cool and grungy kids in skinny jeans and suit jackets who hung out at The Good Mixer Pub in Camden around 2004.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Saint Laurent

The anticipation was palpable as audience members including fashion designer Azzedine Alaïa gathered inside Le Grand Palais to see the new menswear collection by Hedi Slimane. The room darkened and huge speakers on a gigantic spinning structure that resembled a fairground ride began to spin, sending out the guitar riffs of a garage rock soundtrack. The androgynous collection that followed directly reflected the spirit of rock 'n' roll and one that seemed pegged for a younger crowd - unlike that of Slimane's womenswear collection, which felt more like high luxury and for an audience who were thirty and above. Skinny leather jeans came with thick, baggy jumpers accessorised with animal print scarves. Ripped denim jeans rocked down the runway too which Slimane populated with boys and girls, and it was often purposefully hard to tell which was which. Overall the look was very British and incredibly reminiscent of the cool and grungy kids in skinny jeans and suit jackets who hung out at The Good Mixer Pub in Camden around 2004.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Saint Laurent

The anticipation was palpable as audience members including fashion designer Azzedine Alaïa gathered inside Le Grand Palais to see the new menswear collection by Hedi Slimane. The room darkened and huge speakers on a gigantic spinning structure that resembled a fairground ride began to spin, sending out the guitar riffs of a garage rock soundtrack. The androgynous collection that followed directly reflected the spirit of rock 'n' roll and one that seemed pegged for a younger crowd - unlike that of Slimane's womenswear collection, which felt more like high luxury and for an audience who were thirty and above. Skinny leather jeans came with thick, baggy jumpers accessorised with animal print scarves. Ripped denim jeans rocked down the runway too which Slimane populated with boys and girls, and it was often purposefully hard to tell which was which. Overall the look was very British and incredibly reminiscent of the cool and grungy kids in skinny jeans and suit jackets who hung out at The Good Mixer Pub in Camden around 2004.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

Valentino

Designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccoli are riding their own growing wave in menswear. Graphic plays with houndstooth and Prince of Wales checks came on sleek capes, two-button jackets and long overcoats that concealed duvet lining to stave off the coldest of temperatures. A raw denim two-piece suit with trousers grazing the ankle caught the eye as did the sleek accessories. Models wore black Chelsea boots with a buckle detail or brogues lined with signature Valentino studs. Eye-wear oozed 1970s cool à la Michael Caine, while bags were precise - zip pouches with a leather strap through which hands could be slipped for a firm grip. A reason why the Valentino cut looks so slick? Thermoform tailoring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: Sarah Hay

 


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