Jil Sander

A lethal shot of pure, distilled cranberry in her first look out proved that Ms. Sander is right back on her A game at her namesake label. An intriguing colour narrative - especially in a later exploration of green that saw an olive coat paired with sage slim trousers and an emerald calfskin tote - was just one of many subtle details that nodded to a new, meticulous elegance normally associated with womenswear. Take the shaved fur collars and cuffs, for example, the former of which coddled necks like precious vintage couture. Or the two-tone sleeveless jumpers that fell like 1960s tunics over pin-straight trousers cropped above the ankle. The mood, however, stayed manly, thanks to Sander's deft reinterpretation of classic pinstripes and tartans, both of which became abstracted like blurred paintings on cascading coats and short sharply-tailored jackets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Jil Sander

A lethal shot of pure, distilled cranberry in her first look out proved that Ms. Sander is right back on her A game at her namesake label. An intriguing colour narrative - especially in a later exploration of green that saw an olive coat paired with sage slim trousers and an emerald calfskin tote - was just one of many subtle details that nodded to a new, meticulous elegance normally associated with womenswear. Take the shaved fur collars and cuffs, for example, the former of which coddled necks like precious vintage couture. Or the two-tone sleeveless jumpers that fell like 1960s tunics over pin-straight trousers cropped above the ankle. The mood, however, stayed manly, thanks to Sander's deft reinterpretation of classic pinstripes and tartans, both of which became abstracted like blurred paintings on cascading coats and short sharply-tailored jackets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Jil Sander

A lethal shot of pure, distilled cranberry in her first look out proved that Ms. Sander is right back on her A game at her namesake label. An intriguing colour narrative - especially in a later exploration of green that saw an olive coat paired with sage slim trousers and an emerald calfskin tote - was just one of many subtle details that nodded to a new, meticulous elegance normally associated with womenswear. Take the shaved fur collars and cuffs, for example, the former of which coddled necks like precious vintage couture. Or the two-tone sleeveless jumpers that fell like 1960s tunics over pin-straight trousers cropped above the ankle. The mood, however, stayed manly, thanks to Sander's deft reinterpretation of classic pinstripes and tartans, both of which became abstracted like blurred paintings on cascading coats and short sharply-tailored jackets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Jil Sander

A lethal shot of pure, distilled cranberry in her first look out proved that Ms. Sander is right back on her A game at her namesake label. An intriguing colour narrative - especially in a later exploration of green that saw an olive coat paired with sage slim trousers and an emerald calfskin tote - was just one of many subtle details that nodded to a new, meticulous elegance normally associated with womenswear. Take the shaved fur collars and cuffs, for example, the former of which coddled necks like precious vintage couture. Or the two-tone sleeveless jumpers that fell like 1960s tunics over pin-straight trousers cropped above the ankle. The mood, however, stayed manly, thanks to Sander's deft reinterpretation of classic pinstripes and tartans, both of which became abstracted like blurred paintings on cascading coats and short sharply-tailored jackets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Jil Sander

A lethal shot of pure, distilled cranberry in her first look out proved that Ms. Sander is right back on her A game at her namesake label. An intriguing colour narrative - especially in a later exploration of green that saw an olive coat paired with sage slim trousers and an emerald calfskin tote - was just one of many subtle details that nodded to a new, meticulous elegance normally associated with womenswear. Take the shaved fur collars and cuffs, for example, the former of which coddled necks like precious vintage couture. Or the two-tone sleeveless jumpers that fell like 1960s tunics over pin-straight trousers cropped above the ankle. The mood, however, stayed manly, thanks to Sander's deft reinterpretation of classic pinstripes and tartans, both of which became abstracted like blurred paintings on cascading coats and short sharply-tailored jackets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Ermenegildo Zegna

There were definitely more than 50 shades of grey on the Zegna runway, but none that ran the risk of an XXX rating. With its uber thin silks and award-winning wools, Zegna is, of course, much more interested in longstanding luxury than fleeting kink. But in its own way, the business attire got roughened up with surfaces that looked handled and scratched. The graphic effect continued on classic car coats made from Zegna's prized spazzolino alpaca fabric and on the covetable cashmere boucle sweatshirts that had a pebbled surface. Our favourite touch? The skinny ties that were tucked into mini half-cummerbunds and worn with sharp day suits. An original black tie touch equally suited to the limousine or the boardroom.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Ermenegildo Zegna

There were definitely more than 50 shades of grey on the Zegna runway, but none that ran the risk of an XXX rating. With its uber thin silks and award-winning wools, Zegna is, of course, much more interested in longstanding luxury than fleeting kink. But in its own way, the business attire got roughened up with surfaces that looked handled and scratched. The graphic effect continued on classic car coats made from Zegna's prized spazzolino alpaca fabric and on the covetable cashmere boucle sweatshirts that had a pebbled surface. Our favourite touch? The skinny ties that were tucked into mini half-cummerbunds and worn with sharp day suits. An original black tie touch equally suited to the limousine or the boardroom.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Ermenegildo Zegna

There were definitely more than 50 shades of grey on the Zegna runway, but none that ran the risk of an XXX rating. With its uber thin silks and award-winning wools, Zegna is, of course, much more interested in longstanding luxury than fleeting kink. But in its own way, the business attire got roughened up with surfaces that looked handled and scratched. The graphic effect continued on classic car coats made from Zegna's prized spazzolino alpaca fabric and on the covetable cashmere boucle sweatshirts that had a pebbled surface. Our favourite touch? The skinny ties that were tucked into mini half-cummerbunds and worn with sharp day suits. An original black tie touch equally suited to the limousine or the boardroom.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Ermenegildo Zegna

There were definitely more than 50 shades of grey on the Zegna runway, but none that ran the risk of an XXX rating. With its uber thin silks and award-winning wools, Zegna is, of course, much more interested in longstanding luxury than fleeting kink. But in its own way, the business attire got roughened up with surfaces that looked handled and scratched. The graphic effect continued on classic car coats made from Zegna's prized spazzolino alpaca fabric and on the covetable cashmere boucle sweatshirts that had a pebbled surface. Our favourite touch? The skinny ties that were tucked into mini half-cummerbunds and worn with sharp day suits. An original black tie touch equally suited to the limousine or the boardroom.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Ermenegildo Zegna

There were definitely more than 50 shades of grey on the Zegna runway, but none that ran the risk of an XXX rating. With its uber thin silks and award-winning wools, Zegna is, of course, much more interested in longstanding luxury than fleeting kink. But in its own way, the business attire got roughened up with surfaces that looked handled and scratched. The graphic effect continued on classic car coats made from Zegna's prized spazzolino alpaca fabric and on the covetable cashmere boucle sweatshirts that had a pebbled surface. Our favourite touch? The skinny ties that were tucked into mini half-cummerbunds and worn with sharp day suits. An original black tie touch equally suited to the limousine or the boardroom.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Burberry Prorsum

How long has it been since we've seen Burberry's famous plaid actually sweep across one of its own runways? That unmistakeable signature, seen roped around a sea of necks on every high street in the world, has been a no-show in Christopher Bailey's shows of late. Until now, that is. In his Fall 2013 collection dubbed ‘I ♥ Classics’, the plaid made a subtle return to the stage on cropped scarf-ettes and on the ends of duffle bags decked out in leopard-printed ponyskin. Greater than this checked pattern, perhaps, are the traditional outerwear shapes upon which Burberry has made its name and those came in the form of trenches, duffels, Chesterfields, cabans, bomber jackets and even, donkey jackets. The selection was dazzling, made more so by the elegant hand with which they were treated - glossy ponyskin exteriors, or animal print interiors on nylon or canvas wool coats. The leopards and zebras made quite an impression, shaking the classics out of their staid past and adding some fever even to the flat lace-up shoes under foot.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Burberry Prorsum

How long has it been since we've seen Burberry's famous plaid actually sweep across one of its own runways? That unmistakeable signature, seen roped around a sea of necks on every high street in the world, has been a no-show in Christopher Bailey's shows of late. Until now, that is. In his Fall 2013 collection dubbed ‘I ♥ Classics’, the plaid made a subtle return to the stage on cropped scarf-ettes and on the ends of duffle bags decked out in leopard-printed ponyskin. Greater than this checked pattern, perhaps, are the traditional outerwear shapes upon which Burberry has made its name and those came in the form of trenches, duffels, Chesterfields, cabans, bomber jackets and even, donkey jackets. The selection was dazzling, made more so by the elegant hand with which they were treated - glossy ponyskin exteriors, or animal print interiors on nylon or canvas wool coats. The leopards and zebras made quite an impression, shaking the classics out of their staid past and adding some fever even to the flat lace-up shoes under foot.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Burberry Prorsum

How long has it been since we've seen Burberry's famous plaid actually sweep across one of its own runways? That unmistakeable signature, seen roped around a sea of necks on every high street in the world, has been a no-show in Christopher Bailey's shows of late. Until now, that is. In his Fall 2013 collection dubbed ‘I ♥ Classics’, the plaid made a subtle return to the stage on cropped scarf-ettes and on the ends of duffle bags decked out in leopard-printed ponyskin. Greater than this checked pattern, perhaps, are the traditional outerwear shapes upon which Burberry has made its name and those came in the form of trenches, duffels, Chesterfields, cabans, bomber jackets and even, donkey jackets. The selection was dazzling, made more so by the elegant hand with which they were treated - glossy ponyskin exteriors, or animal print interiors on nylon or canvas wool coats. The leopards and zebras made quite an impression, shaking the classics out of their staid past and adding some fever even to the flat lace-up shoes under foot.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Burberry Prorsum

How long has it been since we've seen Burberry's famous plaid actually sweep across one of its own runways? That unmistakeable signature, seen roped around a sea of necks on every high street in the world, has been a no-show in Christopher Bailey's shows of late. Until now, that is. In his Fall 2013 collection dubbed ‘I ♥ Classics’, the plaid made a subtle return to the stage on cropped scarf-ettes and on the ends of duffle bags decked out in leopard-printed ponyskin. Greater than this checked pattern, perhaps, are the traditional outerwear shapes upon which Burberry has made its name and those came in the form of trenches, duffels, Chesterfields, cabans, bomber jackets and even, donkey jackets. The selection was dazzling, made more so by the elegant hand with which they were treated - glossy ponyskin exteriors, or animal print interiors on nylon or canvas wool coats. The leopards and zebras made quite an impression, shaking the classics out of their staid past and adding some fever even to the flat lace-up shoes under foot.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Burberry Prorsum

How long has it been since we've seen Burberry's famous plaid actually sweep across one of its own runways? That unmistakeable signature, seen roped around a sea of necks on every high street in the world, has been a no-show in Christopher Bailey's shows of late. Until now, that is. In his Fall 2013 collection dubbed ‘I ♥ Classics’, the plaid made a subtle return to the stage on cropped scarf-ettes and on the ends of duffle bags decked out in leopard-printed ponyskin. Greater than this checked pattern, perhaps, are the traditional outerwear shapes upon which Burberry has made its name and those came in the form of trenches, duffels, Chesterfields, cabans, bomber jackets and even, donkey jackets. The selection was dazzling, made more so by the elegant hand with which they were treated - glossy ponyskin exteriors, or animal print interiors on nylon or canvas wool coats. The leopards and zebras made quite an impression, shaking the classics out of their staid past and adding some fever even to the flat lace-up shoes under foot.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Neil Barrett

This season, Neil Barrett promised to take his show audience on a trip to back to 'the purist cuts and minimalism of the 1990s' - a time when Mr. Barrett himself was still a wee but brilliant star in the studio of Ms. Miuccia Prada. He may have cleaned up his cutting act and erased surface decoration, but that doesn't mean that we snoozed through his show. On the contrary, the diagonal and diamond collaging he created on stiffened 3D sweatshirts and bomber jackets was a graphic treat. Wielding black leather, glossy ponyskin and compact felt, Barrett patched together seamed blocks of black, white and camel, anchoring them on skinny trousers and hefty soles with metallic toe caps. Other high points included the pressed astrakhan wool and the impeccable camel hair coats shaved within an inch of their life for a true take on precision tailoring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Neil Barrett

This season, Neil Barrett promised to take his show audience on a trip to back to 'the purist cuts and minimalism of the 1990s' - a time when Mr. Barrett himself was still a wee but brilliant star in the studio of Ms. Miuccia Prada. He may have cleaned up his cutting act and erased surface decoration, but that doesn't mean that we snoozed through his show. On the contrary, the diagonal and diamond collaging he created on stiffened 3D sweatshirts and bomber jackets was a graphic treat. Wielding black leather, glossy ponyskin and compact felt, Barrett patched together seamed blocks of black, white and camel, anchoring them on skinny trousers and hefty soles with metallic toe caps. Other high points included the pressed astrakhan wool and the impeccable camel hair coats shaved within an inch of their life for a true take on precision tailoring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Neil Barrett

This season, Neil Barrett promised to take his show audience on a trip to back to 'the purist cuts and minimalism of the 1990s' - a time when Mr. Barrett himself was still a wee but brilliant star in the studio of Ms. Miuccia Prada. He may have cleaned up his cutting act and erased surface decoration, but that doesn't mean that we snoozed through his show. On the contrary, the diagonal and diamond collaging he created on stiffened 3D sweatshirts and bomber jackets was a graphic treat. Wielding black leather, glossy ponyskin and compact felt, Barrett patched together seamed blocks of black, white and camel, anchoring them on skinny trousers and hefty soles with metallic toe caps. Other high points included the pressed astrakhan wool and the impeccable camel hair coats shaved within an inch of their life for a true take on precision tailoring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Neil Barrett

This season, Neil Barrett promised to take his show audience on a trip to back to 'the purist cuts and minimalism of the 1990s' - a time when Mr. Barrett himself was still a wee but brilliant star in the studio of Ms. Miuccia Prada. He may have cleaned up his cutting act and erased surface decoration, but that doesn't mean that we snoozed through his show. On the contrary, the diagonal and diamond collaging he created on stiffened 3D sweatshirts and bomber jackets was a graphic treat. Wielding black leather, glossy ponyskin and compact felt, Barrett patched together seamed blocks of black, white and camel, anchoring them on skinny trousers and hefty soles with metallic toe caps. Other high points included the pressed astrakhan wool and the impeccable camel hair coats shaved within an inch of their life for a true take on precision tailoring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Neil Barrett

This season, Neil Barrett promised to take his show audience on a trip to back to 'the purist cuts and minimalism of the 1990s' - a time when Mr. Barrett himself was still a wee but brilliant star in the studio of Ms. Miuccia Prada. He may have cleaned up his cutting act and erased surface decoration, but that doesn't mean that we snoozed through his show. On the contrary, the diagonal and diamond collaging he created on stiffened 3D sweatshirts and bomber jackets was a graphic treat. Wielding black leather, glossy ponyskin and compact felt, Barrett patched together seamed blocks of black, white and camel, anchoring them on skinny trousers and hefty soles with metallic toe caps. Other high points included the pressed astrakhan wool and the impeccable camel hair coats shaved within an inch of their life for a true take on precision tailoring.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Versace

Woah, boys! Come next Fall, you’re going to want to hang on to your banana slings because Versace is offering very little else to cover your assets. There was skin aplenty on this runway, but none more so than in the negligees that Donatella Versace wittily wrapped her models up in the guise of athletic gear. Whether it was the black lace biker tights paired with a glossy satin tuxedo jacket and gleaming bare chest, or a white lace wrestling suit paired with a white trench, the sultry skin display was as steamy as a Penthouse spread. Male sexuality aside, Donatella seemed to be preoccupied with the question of taste, with head-to-toe graffiti printed denim, cartoon versions of 1940s ties paired with 1980s silk shirts, and a black alligator tracksuit cut in the silhouette of one Mr. MC Hammer being thrown into the heady mix. This collection may have pushed the boundaries, but we do, it must be said, admire the confidence.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Versace

Woah, boys! Come next Fall, you’re going to want to hang on to your banana slings because Versace is offering very little else to cover your assets. There was skin aplenty on this runway, but none more so than in the negligees that Donatella Versace wittily wrapped her models up in the guise of athletic gear. Whether it was the black lace biker tights paired with a glossy satin tuxedo jacket and gleaming bare chest, or a white lace wrestling suit paired with a white trench, the sultry skin display was as steamy as a Penthouse spread. Male sexuality aside, Donatella seemed to be preoccupied with the question of taste, with head-to-toe graffiti printed denim, cartoon versions of 1940s ties paired with 1980s silk shirts, and a black alligator tracksuit cut in the silhouette of one Mr. MC Hammer being thrown into the heady mix. This collection may have pushed the boundaries, but we do, it must be said, admire the confidence.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Versace

Woah, boys! Come next Fall, you’re going to want to hang on to your banana slings because Versace is offering very little else to cover your assets. There was skin aplenty on this runway, but none more so than in the negligees that Donatella Versace wittily wrapped her models up in the guise of athletic gear. Whether it was the black lace biker tights paired with a glossy satin tuxedo jacket and gleaming bare chest, or a white lace wrestling suit paired with a white trench, the sultry skin display was as steamy as a Penthouse spread. Male sexuality aside, Donatella seemed to be preoccupied with the question of taste, with head-to-toe graffiti printed denim, cartoon versions of 1940s ties paired with 1980s silk shirts, and a black alligator tracksuit cut in the silhouette of one Mr. MC Hammer being thrown into the heady mix. This collection may have pushed the boundaries, but we do, it must be said, admire the confidence.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Versace

Woah, boys! Come next Fall, you’re going to want to hang on to your banana slings because Versace is offering very little else to cover your assets. There was skin aplenty on this runway, but none more so than in the negligees that Donatella Versace wittily wrapped her models up in the guise of athletic gear. Whether it was the black lace biker tights paired with a glossy satin tuxedo jacket and gleaming bare chest, or a white lace wrestling suit paired with a white trench, the sultry skin display was as steamy as a Penthouse spread. Male sexuality aside, Donatella seemed to be preoccupied with the question of taste, with head-to-toe graffiti printed denim, cartoon versions of 1940s ties paired with 1980s silk shirts, and a black alligator tracksuit cut in the silhouette of one Mr. MC Hammer being thrown into the heady mix. This collection may have pushed the boundaries, but we do, it must be said, admire the confidence.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Versace

Woah, boys! Come next Fall, you’re going to want to hang on to your banana slings because Versace is offering very little else to cover your assets. There was skin aplenty on this runway, but none more so than in the negligees that Donatella Versace wittily wrapped her models up in the guise of athletic gear. Whether it was the black lace biker tights paired with a glossy satin tuxedo jacket and gleaming bare chest, or a white lace wrestling suit paired with a white trench, the sultry skin display was as steamy as a Penthouse spread. Male sexuality aside, Donatella seemed to be preoccupied with the question of taste, with head-to-toe graffiti printed denim, cartoon versions of 1940s ties paired with 1980s silk shirts, and a black alligator tracksuit cut in the silhouette of one Mr. MC Hammer being thrown into the heady mix. This collection may have pushed the boundaries, but we do, it must be said, admire the confidence.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Bottega Veneta

There was nothing overly showy about the confidently understated line-up that focused heavily on double breasted-suiting - and there needn't be. Tomas Maier's special brand of showmanship lay entirely in impeccably discrete tailoring details, such as leather panelling and contrast lining. While the German-born designer may have exercised restraint in his silhouettes, the fabrics - cashmere, worsted wool, supple leather, shearling - were far from austere. The winter palette was suitably serene, with lush lavender and muted rose elevating the moodiness of the rest of the predominantly sombre black ensembles. Patchwork knit sweaters and faded digitised checks rounded off what was overall an elegant 'no muss, no fuss' offering.
 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Jessica Klingelfuss

Bottega Veneta

There was nothing overly showy about the confidently understated line-up that focused heavily on double breasted-suiting - and there needn't be. Tomas Maier's special brand of showmanship lay entirely in impeccably discrete tailoring details, such as leather panelling and contrast lining. While the German-born designer may have exercised restraint in his silhouettes, the fabrics - cashmere, worsted wool, supple leather, shearling - were far from austere. The winter palette was suitably serene, with lush lavender and muted rose elevating the moodiness of the rest of the predominantly sombre black ensembles. Patchwork knit sweaters and faded digitised checks rounded off what was overall an elegant 'no muss, no fuss' offering.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Jessica Klingelfuss

Bottega Veneta

There was nothing overly showy about the confidently understated line-up that focused heavily on double breasted-suiting - and there needn't be. Tomas Maier's special brand of showmanship lay entirely in impeccably discrete tailoring details, such as leather panelling and contrast lining. While the German-born designer may have exercised restraint in his silhouettes, the fabrics - cashmere, worsted wool, supple leather, shearling - were far from austere. The winter palette was suitably serene, with lush lavender and muted rose elevating the moodiness of the rest of the predominantly sombre black ensembles. Patchwork knit sweaters and faded digitised checks rounded off what was overall an elegant 'no muss, no fuss' offering.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Jessica Klingelfuss

Bottega Veneta

There was nothing overly showy about the confidently understated line-up that focused heavily on double breasted-suiting - and there needn't be. Tomas Maier's special brand of showmanship lay entirely in impeccably discrete tailoring details, such as leather panelling and contrast lining. While the German-born designer may have exercised restraint in his silhouettes, the fabrics - cashmere, worsted wool, supple leather, shearling - were far from austere. The winter palette was suitably serene, with lush lavender and muted rose elevating the moodiness of the rest of the predominantly sombre black ensembles. Patchwork knit sweaters and faded digitised checks rounded off what was overall an elegant 'no muss, no fuss' offering.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Jessica Klingelfuss

Bottega Veneta

There was nothing overly showy about the confidently understated line-up that focused heavily on double breasted-suiting - and there needn't be. Tomas Maier's special brand of showmanship lay entirely in impeccably discrete tailoring details, such as leather panelling and contrast lining. While the German-born designer may have exercised restraint in his silhouettes, the fabrics - cashmere, worsted wool, supple leather, shearling - were far from austere. The winter palette was suitably serene, with lush lavender and muted rose elevating the moodiness of the rest of the predominantly sombre black ensembles. Patchwork knit sweaters and faded digitised checks rounded off what was overall an elegant 'no muss, no fuss' offering.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: Jessica Klingelfuss

Trussardi

The blanket of fallen leaves covering Trussardi's runway set the tone for a collection that exploded in the natural beauty of autumn. Though he's best known as a showman, creative director Umit Benan harbours a less celebrated but perhaps more striking talent as a brilliant colourist. An ochre poncho, a waxy wine trench, a pine corduroy suit and a navy bonded-cotton Macintosh were all but singular pieces upon which a romantic, alluring colour story was built. Though silhouettes for suits were straightforward and hardly news-making, Benan put more elbow grease into the outerwear. Jackets for hunting, fishing and exploring had the freshness of the great outdoors - enjoyed by men with burly beards, lined faces and regular frames.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

The blanket of fallen leaves covering Trussardi's runway set the tone for a collection that exploded in the natural beauty of autumn. Though he's best known as a showman, creative director Umit Benan harbours a less celebrated but perhaps more striking talent as a brilliant colourist. An ochre poncho, a waxy wine trench, a pine corduroy suit and a navy bonded-cotton Macintosh were all but singular pieces upon which a romantic, alluring colour story was built. Though silhouettes for suits were straightforward and hardly news-making, Benan put more elbow grease into the outerwear. Jackets for hunting, fishing and exploring had the freshness of the great outdoors - enjoyed by men with burly beards, lined faces and regular frames.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

The blanket of fallen leaves covering Trussardi's runway set the tone for a collection that exploded in the natural beauty of autumn. Though he's best known as a showman, creative director Umit Benan harbours a less celebrated but perhaps more striking talent as a brilliant colourist. An ochre poncho, a waxy wine trench, a pine corduroy suit and a navy bonded-cotton Macintosh were all but singular pieces upon which a romantic, alluring colour story was built. Though silhouettes for suits were straightforward and hardly news-making, Benan put more elbow grease into the outerwear. Jackets for hunting, fishing and exploring had the freshness of the great outdoors - enjoyed by men with burly beards, lined faces and regular frames.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

The blanket of fallen leaves covering Trussardi's runway set the tone for a collection that exploded in the natural beauty of autumn. Though he's best known as a showman, creative director Umit Benan harbours a less celebrated but perhaps more striking talent as a brilliant colourist. An ochre poncho, a waxy wine trench, a pine corduroy suit and a navy bonded-cotton Macintosh were all but singular pieces upon which a romantic, alluring colour story was built. Though silhouettes for suits were straightforward and hardly news-making, Benan put more elbow grease into the outerwear. Jackets for hunting, fishing and exploring had the freshness of the great outdoors - enjoyed by men with burly beards, lined faces and regular frames.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

The blanket of fallen leaves covering Trussardi's runway set the tone for a collection that exploded in the natural beauty of autumn. Though he's best known as a showman, creative director Umit Benan harbours a less celebrated but perhaps more striking talent as a brilliant colourist. An ochre poncho, a waxy wine trench, a pine corduroy suit and a navy bonded-cotton Macintosh were all but singular pieces upon which a romantic, alluring colour story was built. Though silhouettes for suits were straightforward and hardly news-making, Benan put more elbow grease into the outerwear. Jackets for hunting, fishing and exploring had the freshness of the great outdoors - enjoyed by men with burly beards, lined faces and regular frames.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

For a show almost completely devoid of colour, it was amazing how much depth there was to the clothes at Salvatore Ferragamo. Working in shades of black and midnight, creative director Massimiliano Giornetti brought a cool, new finish to his menswear - most poignantly to his undeniably masculine outerwear. Power pieces like the boxy wool great coats and shearling trenchcoats were given a matt, almost rubberised coating. And with graphic leather taping that trimmed the bodies like a corset, these structured pieces seemed determined to stand alone 'in piedi'. This was a strong, confident show, easy on the tailored pieces the label does so well, but still planting new ideas into the concept of business attire. There is, after all, nothing quite like a pair of nylon arms or a black-leather chest to spice up your average grey-flannel suit.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

For a show almost completely devoid of colour, it was amazing how much depth there was to the clothes at Salvatore Ferragamo. Working in shades of black and midnight, creative director Massimiliano Giornetti brought a cool, new finish to his menswear - most poignantly to his undeniably masculine outerwear. Power pieces like the boxy wool great coats and shearling trenchcoats were given a matt, almost rubberised coating. And with graphic leather taping that trimmed the bodies like a corset, these structured pieces seemed determined to stand alone 'in piedi'. This was a strong, confident show, easy on the tailored pieces the label does so well, but still planting new ideas into the concept of business attire. There is, after all, nothing quite like a pair of nylon arms or a black-leather chest to spice up your average grey-flannel suit.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

For a show almost completely devoid of colour, it was amazing how much depth there was to the clothes at Salvatore Ferragamo. Working in shades of black and midnight, creative director Massimiliano Giornetti brought a cool, new finish to his menswear - most poignantly to his undeniably masculine outerwear. Power pieces like the boxy wool great coats and shearling trenchcoats were given a matt, almost rubberised coating. And with graphic leather taping that trimmed the bodies like a corset, these structured pieces seemed determined to stand alone 'in piedi'. This was a strong, confident show, easy on the tailored pieces the label does so well, but still planting new ideas into the concept of business attire. There is, after all, nothing quite like a pair of nylon arms or a black-leather chest to spice up your average grey-flannel suit.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

For a show almost completely devoid of colour, it was amazing how much depth there was to the clothes at Salvatore Ferragamo. Working in shades of black and midnight, creative director Massimiliano Giornetti brought a cool, new finish to his menswear - most poignantly to his undeniably masculine outerwear. Power pieces like the boxy wool great coats and shearling trenchcoats were given a matt, almost rubberised coating. And with graphic leather taping that trimmed the bodies like a corset, these structured pieces seemed determined to stand alone 'in piedi'. This was a strong, confident show, easy on the tailored pieces the label does so well, but still planting new ideas into the concept of business attire. There is, after all, nothing quite like a pair of nylon arms or a black-leather chest to spice up your average grey-flannel suit.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

For a show almost completely devoid of colour, it was amazing how much depth there was to the clothes at Salvatore Ferragamo. Working in shades of black and midnight, creative director Massimiliano Giornetti brought a cool, new finish to his menswear - most poignantly to his undeniably masculine outerwear. Power pieces like the boxy wool great coats and shearling trenchcoats were given a matt, almost rubberised coating. And with graphic leather taping that trimmed the bodies like a corset, these structured pieces seemed determined to stand alone 'in piedi'. This was a strong, confident show, easy on the tailored pieces the label does so well, but still planting new ideas into the concept of business attire. There is, after all, nothing quite like a pair of nylon arms or a black-leather chest to spice up your average grey-flannel suit.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

Italo Zucchelli has a master's degree in fabric manipulation, and in this season of richly transformed surfaces you'd better believe he was at the top of his game. Mixing materials is a menswear hot spot, and Zucchelli did it brilliantly with bonded-wool and micromesh panels that gave sleek overcoats and boxy jackets a tiny grid effect. Working in strict black, oxblood and petrol green, he built waffle-effect chevrons and quilted patterns into sweatshirts, body-clinging knit jumpers and flattened bomber jackets. Even Calvin's signature slim suiting got the treatment with quilted-nylon vests that wrapped around them snugly.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

Italo Zucchelli has a master's degree in fabric manipulation, and in this season of richly transformed surfaces you'd better believe he was at the top of his game. Mixing materials is a menswear hot spot, and Zucchelli did it brilliantly with bonded-wool and micromesh panels that gave sleek overcoats and boxy jackets a tiny grid effect. Working in strict black, oxblood and petrol green, he built waffle-effect chevrons and quilted patterns into sweatshirts, body-clinging knit jumpers and flattened bomber jackets. Even Calvin's signature slim suiting got the treatment with quilted-nylon vests that wrapped around them snugly.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

Italo Zucchelli has a master's degree in fabric manipulation, and in this season of richly transformed surfaces you'd better believe he was at the top of his game. Mixing materials is a menswear hot spot, and Zucchelli did it brilliantly with bonded-wool and micromesh panels that gave sleek overcoats and boxy jackets a tiny grid effect. Working in strict black, oxblood and petrol green, he built waffle-effect chevrons and quilted patterns into sweatshirts, body-clinging knit jumpers and flattened bomber jackets. Even Calvin's signature slim suiting got the treatment with quilted-nylon vests that wrapped around them snugly.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

Italo Zucchelli has a master's degree in fabric manipulation, and in this season of richly transformed surfaces you'd better believe he was at the top of his game. Mixing materials is a menswear hot spot, and Zucchelli did it brilliantly with bonded-wool and micromesh panels that gave sleek overcoats and boxy jackets a tiny grid effect. Working in strict black, oxblood and petrol green, he built waffle-effect chevrons and quilted patterns into sweatshirts, body-clinging knit jumpers and flattened bomber jackets. Even Calvin's signature slim suiting got the treatment with quilted-nylon vests that wrapped around them snugly.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

Italo Zucchelli has a master's degree in fabric manipulation, and in this season of richly transformed surfaces you'd better believe he was at the top of his game. Mixing materials is a menswear hot spot, and Zucchelli did it brilliantly with bonded-wool and micromesh panels that gave sleek overcoats and boxy jackets a tiny grid effect. Working in strict black, oxblood and petrol green, he built waffle-effect chevrons and quilted patterns into sweatshirts, body-clinging knit jumpers and flattened bomber jackets. Even Calvin's signature slim suiting got the treatment with quilted-nylon vests that wrapped around them snugly.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Missoni

Of all the knitted wonder that walked out on the Missoni runway in Milan, there were two things in particular that caught our eye. First were the new suede-knit hybrid bombers. Cut closely to the body with baseball cuffs and trim, the jackets featured buttery suede zip fronts and cozy sweater backs. Every guy on Earth can and should have one for next autumn. The second doozies were the oatmeal-coloured knit vests with sunset colours woven into their backs by fine-knit looms. From the front they're a terrific wear-with-everything basic; from the back they're a real fashion statement. The rest of the news this season was simple but on point - exclusive slippers made in conjunction with Milan-based CB and deep, dark denim by Jean Machine.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Missoni

Of all the knitted wonder that walked out on the Missoni runway in Milan, there were two things in particular that caught our eye. First were the new suede-knit hybrid bombers. Cut closely to the body with baseball cuffs and trim, the jackets featured buttery suede zip fronts and cozy sweater backs. Every guy on Earth can and should have one for next autumn. The second doozies were the oatmeal-coloured knit vests with sunset colours woven into their backs by fine-knit looms. From the front they're a terrific wear-with-everything basic; from the back they're a real fashion statement. The rest of the news this season was simple but on point - exclusive slippers made in conjunction with Milan-based CB and deep, dark denim by Jean Machine.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Missoni

Of all the knitted wonder that walked out on the Missoni runway in Milan, there were two things in particular that caught our eye. First were the new suede-knit hybrid bombers. Cut closely to the body with baseball cuffs and trim, the jackets featured buttery suede zip fronts and cozy sweater backs. Every guy on Earth can and should have one for next autumn. The second doozies were the oatmeal-coloured knit vests with sunset colours woven into their backs by fine-knit looms. From the front they're a terrific wear-with-everything basic; from the back they're a real fashion statement. The rest of the news this season was simple but on point - exclusive slippers made in conjunction with Milan-based CB and deep, dark denim by Jean Machine.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Missoni

Of all the knitted wonder that walked out on the Missoni runway in Milan, there were two things in particular that caught our eye. First were the new suede-knit hybrid bombers. Cut closely to the body with baseball cuffs and trim, the jackets featured buttery suede zip fronts and cozy sweater backs. Every guy on Earth can and should have one for next autumn. The second doozies were the oatmeal-coloured knit vests with sunset colours woven into their backs by fine-knit looms. From the front they're a terrific wear-with-everything basic; from the back they're a real fashion statement. The rest of the news this season was simple but on point - exclusive slippers made in conjunction with Milan-based CB and deep, dark denim by Jean Machine.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Missoni

Of all the knitted wonder that walked out on the Missoni runway in Milan, there were two things in particular that caught our eye. First were the new suede-knit hybrid bombers. Cut closely to the body with baseball cuffs and trim, the jackets featured buttery suede zip fronts and cozy sweater backs. Every guy on Earth can and should have one for next autumn. The second doozies were the oatmeal-coloured knit vests with sunset colours woven into their backs by fine-knit looms. From the front they're a terrific wear-with-everything basic; from the back they're a real fashion statement. The rest of the news this season was simple but on point - exclusive slippers made in conjunction with Milan-based CB and deep, dark denim by Jean Machine.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

In a show that was both under the top and over the moon, Miuccia Prada showed us all what she does best in menswear: lethal subtlety. The A/W 2013 collection is a proposition in tailoring, but it was no treaty on a boring navy suit. In fact there wasn't a single tie on the runway. Instead, Prada borrowed other key pieces from the boardroom: sharp, collared shirts (she likes hers coloured), boxy jackets and tailored trousers twisted into slouchy, cropped submission. And then, some not-so-businesslike attire, like 1970s vintage-style leather jackets in cropped and long versions that added a leisure slant. Prada also provided a discourse on muted but effective colour, with leathers popping like graphic blocks against contrasting sweaters, and cropped trousers in grey or black. It was all worn, you must know, with lace-up shoes of monster lug soles that could easily power a tractor. Sign us up!

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin
 

Prada

In a show that was both under the top and over the moon, Miuccia Prada showed us all what she does best in menswear: lethal subtlety. The A/W 2013 collection is a proposition in tailoring, but it was no treaty on a boring navy suit. In fact there wasn't a single tie on the runway. Instead, Prada borrowed other key pieces from the boardroom: sharp, collared shirts (she likes hers coloured), boxy jackets and tailored trousers twisted into slouchy, cropped submission. And then, some not-so-businesslike attire, like 1970s vintage-style leather jackets in cropped and long versions that added a leisure slant. Prada also provided a discourse on muted but effective colour, with leathers popping like graphic blocks against contrasting sweaters, and cropped trousers in grey or black. It was all worn, you must know, with lace-up shoes of monster lug soles that could easily power a tractor. Sign us up!

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

In a show that was both under the top and over the moon, Miuccia Prada showed us all what she does best in menswear: lethal subtlety. The A/W 2013 collection is a proposition in tailoring, but it was no treaty on a boring navy suit. In fact there wasn't a single tie on the runway. Instead, Prada borrowed other key pieces from the boardroom: sharp, collared shirts (she likes hers coloured), boxy jackets and tailored trousers twisted into slouchy, cropped submission. And then, some not-so-businesslike attire, like 1970s vintage-style leather jackets in cropped and long versions that added a leisure slant. Prada also provided a discourse on muted but effective colour, with leathers popping like graphic blocks against contrasting sweaters, and cropped trousers in grey or black. It was all worn, you must know, with lace-up shoes of monster lug soles that could easily power a tractor. Sign us up!

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin
 

Prada

In a show that was both under the top and over the moon, Miuccia Prada showed us all what she does best in menswear: lethal subtlety. The A/W 2013 collection is a proposition in tailoring, but it was no treaty on a boring navy suit. In fact there wasn't a single tie on the runway. Instead, Prada borrowed other key pieces from the boardroom: sharp, collared shirts (she likes hers coloured), boxy jackets and tailored trousers twisted into slouchy, cropped submission. And then, some not-so-businesslike attire, like 1970s vintage-style leather jackets in cropped and long versions that added a leisure slant. Prada also provided a discourse on muted but effective colour, with leathers popping like graphic blocks against contrasting sweaters, and cropped trousers in grey or black. It was all worn, you must know, with lace-up shoes of monster lug soles that could easily power a tractor. Sign us up!

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin
 

Prada

In a show that was both under the top and over the moon, Miuccia Prada showed us all what she does best in menswear: lethal subtlety. The A/W 2013 collection is a proposition in tailoring, but it was no treaty on a boring navy suit. In fact there wasn't a single tie on the runway. Instead, Prada borrowed other key pieces from the boardroom: sharp, collared shirts (she likes hers coloured), boxy jackets and tailored trousers twisted into slouchy, cropped submission. And then, some not-so-businesslike attire, like 1970s vintage-style leather jackets in cropped and long versions that added a leisure slant. Prada also provided a discourse on muted but effective colour, with leathers popping like graphic blocks against contrasting sweaters, and cropped trousers in grey or black. It was all worn, you must know, with lace-up shoes of monster lug soles that could easily power a tractor. Sign us up!

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin
 

Moncler Gamme Bleu

What would happen if Braveheart came face to face with a closet full of Moncler puffer jackets? His pleat-back kilt would suddenly sport wooly padding; his animal-skin cloak would be ditched for more thermal-friendly quilted plaid outerwear. Then he'd grab a pair of ski poles instead of a sword while running out the door and off to battle. The war, of course, is on the snowy slopes, and no one but American designer Thom Browne thinks of that battleground in such creative terms. Who else could conceive of plaid sleeping bags unzipping around a man's shoulders? A two-piece suit made from a million-ply cable knit? Or a quilted comforter poncho? Browne has created a captivating fantasyland for any Medieval Scottish knight, but he's also managed to design pieces that no modern man currently has in his closet.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Bleu

What would happen if Braveheart came face to face with a closet full of Moncler puffer jackets? His pleat-back kilt would suddenly sport wooly padding; his animal-skin cloak would be ditched for more thermal-friendly quilted plaid outerwear. Then he'd grab a pair of ski poles instead of a sword while running out the door and off to battle. The war, of course, is on the snowy slopes, and no one but American designer Thom Browne thinks of that battleground in such creative terms. Who else could conceive of plaid sleeping bags unzipping around a man's shoulders? A two-piece suit made from a million-ply cable knit? Or a quilted comforter poncho? Browne has created a captivating fantasyland for any Medieval Scottish knight, but he's also managed to design pieces that no modern man currently has in his closet.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Bleu

What would happen if Braveheart came face to face with a closet full of Moncler puffer jackets? His pleat-back kilt would suddenly sport wooly padding; his animal-skin cloak would be ditched for more thermal-friendly quilted plaid outerwear. Then he'd grab a pair of ski poles instead of a sword while running out the door and off to battle. The war, of course, is on the snowy slopes, and no one but American designer Thom Browne thinks of that battleground in such creative terms. Who else could conceive of plaid sleeping bags unzipping around a man's shoulders? A two-piece suit made from a million-ply cable knit? Or a quilted comforter poncho? Browne has created a captivating fantasyland for any Medieval Scottish knight, but he's also managed to design pieces that no modern man currently has in his closet.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Bleu

What would happen if Braveheart came face to face with a closet full of Moncler puffer jackets? His pleat-back kilt would suddenly sport wooly padding; his animal-skin cloak would be ditched for more thermal-friendly quilted plaid outerwear. Then he'd grab a pair of ski poles instead of a sword while running out the door and off to battle. The war, of course, is on the snowy slopes, and no one but American designer Thom Browne thinks of that battleground in such creative terms. Who else could conceive of plaid sleeping bags unzipping around a man's shoulders? A two-piece suit made from a million-ply cable knit? Or a quilted comforter poncho? Browne has created a captivating fantasyland for any Medieval Scottish knight, but he's also managed to design pieces that no modern man currently has in his closet.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Bleu

What would happen if Braveheart came face to face with a closet full of Moncler puffer jackets? His pleat-back kilt would suddenly sport wooly padding; his animal-skin cloak would be ditched for more thermal-friendly quilted plaid outerwear. Then he'd grab a pair of ski poles instead of a sword while running out the door and off to battle. The war, of course, is on the snowy slopes, and no one but American designer Thom Browne thinks of that battleground in such creative terms. Who else could conceive of plaid sleeping bags unzipping around a man's shoulders? A two-piece suit made from a million-ply cable knit? Or a quilted comforter poncho? Browne has created a captivating fantasyland for any Medieval Scottish knight, but he's also managed to design pieces that no modern man currently has in his closet.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J. Martin

Emporio Armani

Giorgio Armani knocked our preppy socks off at his Emporio show. In a fresh about-face, the Italian designer started his show by boldly mining the cool classics of the Ivy League - navy and red prep-school ties with grey wool-flannel suits and traditional lace-ups. It's been years since we've seen classic camel-hair blazers and peacoats from this designer, and he brought them back with the confidence and élan of a fashion pro. Through this cleaned-up, newly polished lens, Armani gazed at his favoured techno fabrics, yielding strong results. Olive or black leather coats came with a gleaming coating, while knit or wool jackets featured internal membranes to give the bonded fabrics a stiffened body. Even the fur backpacks looked like a plausible, playful take on luxury sportswear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Emporio Armani

Giorgio Armani knocked our preppy socks off at his Emporio show. In a fresh about-face, the Italian designer started his show by boldly mining the cool classics of the Ivy League - navy and red prep-school ties with grey wool-flannel suits and traditional lace-ups. It's been years since we've seen classic camel-hair blazers and peacoats from this designer, and he brought them back with the confidence and élan of a fashion pro. Through this cleaned-up, newly polished lens, Armani gazed at his favoured techno fabrics, yielding strong results. Olive or black leather coats came with a gleaming coating, while knit or wool jackets featured internal membranes to give the bonded fabrics a stiffened body. Even the fur backpacks looked like a plausible, playful take on luxury sportswear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Emporio Armani

Giorgio Armani knocked our preppy socks off at his Emporio show. In a fresh about-face, the Italian designer started his show by boldly mining the cool classics of the Ivy League - navy and red prep-school ties with grey wool-flannel suits and traditional lace-ups. It's been years since we've seen classic camel-hair blazers and peacoats from this designer, and he brought them back with the confidence and élan of a fashion pro. Through this cleaned-up, newly polished lens, Armani gazed at his favoured techno fabrics, yielding strong results. Olive or black leather coats came with a gleaming coating, while knit or wool jackets featured internal membranes to give the bonded fabrics a stiffened body. Even the fur backpacks looked like a plausible, playful take on luxury sportswear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Emporio Armani

Giorgio Armani knocked our preppy socks off at his Emporio show. In a fresh about-face, the Italian designer started his show by boldly mining the cool classics of the Ivy League - navy and red prep-school ties with grey wool-flannel suits and traditional lace-ups. It's been years since we've seen classic camel-hair blazers and peacoats from this designer, and he brought them back with the confidence and élan of a fashion pro. Through this cleaned-up, newly polished lens, Armani gazed at his favoured techno fabrics, yielding strong results. Olive or black leather coats came with a gleaming coating, while knit or wool jackets featured internal membranes to give the bonded fabrics a stiffened body. Even the fur backpacks looked like a plausible, playful take on luxury sportswear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Emporio Armani

Giorgio Armani knocked our preppy socks off at his Emporio show. In a fresh about-face, the Italian designer started his show by boldly mining the cool classics of the Ivy League - navy and red prep-school ties with grey wool-flannel suits and traditional lace-ups. It's been years since we've seen classic camel-hair blazers and peacoats from this designer, and he brought them back with the confidence and élan of a fashion pro. Through this cleaned-up, newly polished lens, Armani gazed at his favoured techno fabrics, yielding strong results. Olive or black leather coats came with a gleaming coating, while knit or wool jackets featured internal membranes to give the bonded fabrics a stiffened body. Even the fur backpacks looked like a plausible, playful take on luxury sportswear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Gucci

The Gucci man is never a sartorial slacker: he's got way too much dough not to look properly done-up. But for Fall, Frida Giannini softened the hard edges of formality and lowered the affected drama of her guys to powerful effect. Nowhere was the nonchalance more visible than in the shorter-than-usual length of her suit jackets - which now barely covered a guy's buns at all. But no matter, because he had an arsenal of heavy-hitting outerwear to cover up the view from his back side. Whether it was the baby blue cavalry jackets with sharp black lapels, sweeping greatcoats in pure white or redingote jackets in wool or astrakhan with big shiny gold buttons, the options of great-looking outerwear were endless. Which doesn't mean that what's beneath was anything to hide. We loved, for example, the nuzzle-inducing lemon mohair jumper worn with loose pewter leather trousers, or the new houndstooth pattern fashioned into a sharp black and white plaid on slim suiting.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Gucci

The Gucci man is never a sartorial slacker: he's got way too much dough not to look properly done-up. But for Fall, Frida Giannini softened the hard edges of formality and lowered the affected drama of her guys to powerful effect. Nowhere was the nonchalance more visible than in the shorter-than-usual length of her suit jackets - which now barely covered a guy's buns at all. But no matter, because he had an arsenal of heavy-hitting outerwear to cover up the view from his back side. Whether it was the baby blue cavalry jackets with sharp black lapels, sweeping greatcoats in pure white or redingote jackets in wool or astrakhan with big shiny gold buttons, the options of great-looking outerwear were endless. Which doesn't mean that what's beneath was anything to hide. We loved, for example, the nuzzle-inducing lemon mohair jumper worn with loose pewter leather trousers, or the new houndstooth pattern fashioned into a sharp black and white plaid on slim suiting.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Gucci

The Gucci man is never a sartorial slacker: he's got way too much dough not to look properly done-up. But for Fall, Frida Giannini softened the hard edges of formality and lowered the affected drama of her guys to powerful effect. Nowhere was the nonchalance more visible than in the shorter-than-usual length of her suit jackets - which now barely covered a guy's buns at all. But no matter, because he had an arsenal of heavy-hitting outerwear to cover up the view from his back side. Whether it was the baby blue cavalry jackets with sharp black lapels, sweeping greatcoats in pure white or redingote jackets in wool or astrakhan with big shiny gold buttons, the options of great-looking outerwear were endless. Which doesn't mean that what's beneath was anything to hide. We loved, for example, the nuzzle-inducing lemon mohair jumper worn with loose pewter leather trousers, or the new houndstooth pattern fashioned into a sharp black and white plaid on slim suiting.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Gucci

The Gucci man is never a sartorial slacker: he's got way too much dough not to look properly done-up. But for Fall, Frida Giannini softened the hard edges of formality and lowered the affected drama of her guys to powerful effect. Nowhere was the nonchalance more visible than in the shorter-than-usual length of her suit jackets - which now barely covered a guy's buns at all. But no matter, because he had an arsenal of heavy-hitting outerwear to cover up the view from his back side. Whether it was the baby blue cavalry jackets with sharp black lapels, sweeping greatcoats in pure white or redingote jackets in wool or astrakhan with big shiny gold buttons, the options of great-looking outerwear were endless. Which doesn't mean that what's beneath was anything to hide. We loved, for example, the nuzzle-inducing lemon mohair jumper worn with loose pewter leather trousers, or the new houndstooth pattern fashioned into a sharp black and white plaid on slim suiting.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Gucci

The Gucci man is never a sartorial slacker: he's got way too much dough not to look properly done-up. But for Fall, Frida Giannini softened the hard edges of formality and lowered the affected drama of her guys to powerful effect. Nowhere was the nonchalance more visible than in the shorter-than-usual length of her suit jackets - which now barely covered a guy's buns at all. But no matter, because he had an arsenal of heavy-hitting outerwear to cover up the view from his back side. Whether it was the baby blue cavalry jackets with sharp black lapels, sweeping greatcoats in pure white or redingote jackets in wool or astrakhan with big shiny gold buttons, the options of great-looking outerwear were endless. Which doesn't mean that what's beneath was anything to hide. We loved, for example, the nuzzle-inducing lemon mohair jumper worn with loose pewter leather trousers, or the new houndstooth pattern fashioned into a sharp black and white plaid on slim suiting.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Z Zegna

Paul Surridge is proving to be a great hire for Zegna. Lassoed from the Jil Sander menswear studio to head up Z Zegna, the designer has completely remodelled Zegna's secondary label, giving it a crisp, cool exterior. As an added bonus for us design freaks, the clothes all have the considered lines and graphic cuts of fashion architecture. A black leather hooded sweatshirt with navy wool felt arms for example, stood away from the body like a box, while matte square vests and wool trousers come with 3D raw-edged, razor-cut seaming. The discourse here seemed to be one of streamlined volume, so even when Surridge played with waxy navy trenches (swept clean of every surface detail possible), or high-waisted sartorially inflected 1940s trousers, they all looked absolutely of the moment.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Z Zegna

Paul Surridge is proving to be a great hire for Zegna. Lassoed from the Jil Sander menswear studio to head up Z Zegna, the designer has completely remodelled Zegna's secondary label, giving it a crisp, cool exterior. As an added bonus for us design freaks, the clothes all have the considered lines and graphic cuts of fashion architecture. A black leather hooded sweatshirt with navy wool felt arms for example, stood away from the body like a box, while matte square vests and wool trousers come with 3D raw-edged, razor-cut seaming. The discourse here seemed to be one of streamlined volume, so even when Surridge played with waxy navy trenches (swept clean of every surface detail possible), or high-waisted sartorially inflected 1940s trousers, they all looked absolutely of the moment.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Z Zegna

Paul Surridge is proving to be a great hire for Zegna. Lassoed from the Jil Sander menswear studio to head up Z Zegna, the designer has completely remodelled Zegna's secondary label, giving it a crisp, cool exterior. As an added bonus for us design freaks, the clothes all have the considered lines and graphic cuts of fashion architecture. A black leather hooded sweatshirt with navy wool felt arms for example, stood away from the body like a box, while matte square vests and wool trousers come with 3D raw-edged, razor-cut seaming. The discourse here seemed to be one of streamlined volume, so even when Surridge played with waxy navy trenches (swept clean of every surface detail possible), or high-waisted sartorially inflected 1940s trousers, they all looked absolutely of the moment.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Z Zegna

Paul Surridge is proving to be a great hire for Zegna. Lassoed from the Jil Sander menswear studio to head up Z Zegna, the designer has completely remodelled Zegna's secondary label, giving it a crisp, cool exterior. As an added bonus for us design freaks, the clothes all have the considered lines and graphic cuts of fashion architecture. A black leather hooded sweatshirt with navy wool felt arms for example, stood away from the body like a box, while matte square vests and wool trousers come with 3D raw-edged, razor-cut seaming. The discourse here seemed to be one of streamlined volume, so even when Surridge played with waxy navy trenches (swept clean of every surface detail possible), or high-waisted sartorially inflected 1940s trousers, they all looked absolutely of the moment.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Z Zegna

Paul Surridge is proving to be a great hire by Zegna. Lassoed from the Jil Sander menswear studio to head up Z Zegna, the designer has completely remodelled Zegna's secondary label, giving it a crisp, cool exterior. As an added bonus for us design freaks, the clothes all have the considered lines and graphic cuts of fashion architecture. A black leather hooded sweatshirt with navy wool felt arms for example, stood away from the body like a box, while matte square vests and wool trousers come with 3D raw-edged, razor-cut seaming. The discourse here seemed to be one of streamlined volume, so even when Surridge played with waxy navy trenches (swept clean of every surface detail possible), or high-waisted sartorially inflected 1940s trousers, they all looked absolutely of this moment.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Umit Benan

Our favourite Milanese showman Umit Benan took to the grimy, garbage-lined streets for Fall. With models wielding woolly face masks over their heads and fat bottles of spray paint in their hands, Benan's collection was a discourse on hoodlum gear, set amongst a shady set of late night characters. And believe us, the criminals never had it so good - Benan dreamed up, for instance, nimble, roomy knit pants paired with white leather high tops. For outerwear, there were the leather and wool felt-patched bomber jackets or silk striped trenches and anoraks. It wasn't all about delinquency, however. The Turkish born designer also reminded his fans about his nimble sartorial hands - stitching together convincing purple and blue plaid wool suits, and some great-looking office grey varieties.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Umit Benan

Our favourite Milanese showman Umit Benan took to the grimy, garbage-lined streets for Fall. With models wielding woolly face masks over their heads and fat bottles of spray paint in their hands, Benan's collection was a discourse on hoodlum gear, set amongst a shady set of late night characters. And believe us, the criminals never had it so good - Benan dreamed up, for instance, nimble, roomy knit pants paired with white leather high tops. For outerwear, there were the leather and wool felt-patched bomber jackets or silk striped trenches and anoraks. It wasn't all about delinquency, however. The Turkish born designer also reminded his fans about his nimble sartorial hands - stitching together convincing purple and blue plaid wool suits, and some great-looking office grey varieties.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Umit Benan

Our favourite Milanese showman Umit Benan took to the grimy, garbage-lined streets for Fall. With models wielding woolly face masks over their heads and fat bottles of spray paint in their hands, Benan's collection was a discourse on hoodlum gear, set amongst a shady set of late night characters. And believe us, the criminals never had it so good - Benan dreamed up, for instance, nimble, roomy knit pants paired with white leather high tops. For outerwear, there were the leather and wool felt-patched bomber jackets or silk striped trenches and anoraks. It wasn't all about delinquency, however. The Turkish born designer also reminded his fans about his nimble sartorial hands - stitching together convincing purple and blue plaid wool suits, and some great-looking office grey varieties.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Umit Benan

Our favourite Milanese showman Umit Benan took to the grimy, garbage-lined streets for Fall. With models wielding woolly face masks over their heads and fat bottles of spray paint in their hands, Benan's collection was a discourse on hoodlum gear, set amongst a shady set of late night characters. And believe us, the criminals never had it so good - Benan dreamed up, for instance, nimble, roomy knit pants paired with white leather high tops. For outerwear, there were the leather and wool felt-patched bomber jackets or silk striped trenches and anoraks. It wasn't all about delinquency, however. The Turkish born designer also reminded his fans about his nimble sartorial hands - stitching together convincing purple and blue plaid wool suits, and some great-looking office grey varieties.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Umit Benan

Our favourite Milanese showman Umit Benan took to the grimy, garbage-lined streets for Fall. With models wielding woolly face masks over their heads and fat bottles of spray paint in their hands, Benan's collection was a discourse on hoodlum gear, set amongst a shady set of late night characters. And believe us, the criminals never had it so good - Benan dreamed up, for instance, nimble, roomy knit pants paired with white leather high tops. For outerwear, there were the leather and wool felt-patched bomber jackets or silk striped trenches and anoraks. It wasn't all about delinquency, however. The Turkish born designer also reminded his fans about his nimble sartorial hands - stitching together convincing purple and blue plaid wool suits, and some great-looking office grey varieties.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Fendi

Unsurprisingly, there were some excellent fur pieces at the Fendi Men’s presentation — coyote looking anoraks and foxy après-ski boots that could do a double circuit between St. Moritz and central London without missing a beat. But the big news this season was how un-furry and un-leathery the collection was and, rather, what a wonderful treaty it was on chic, modern tailoring. Gleaming grey cashmeres and buttery slate wools made for a clean, urban canvas to showcase everything from straight-cut cabans and anoraks to sharp-shouldered business suits. The novelty here was all of the classic business blends, from dark, chic Prince of Wales checks to boardroom pinstripes and grey tweeds that flecked just as many overcoats as they did cozy oversized sweaters

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Fendi

Unsurprisingly, there were some excellent fur pieces at the Fendi Men’s presentation — coyote looking anoraks and foxy après-ski boots that could do a double circuit between St. Moritz and central London without missing a beat. But the big news this season was how un-furry and un-leathery the collection was and, rather, what a wonderful treaty it was on chic, modern tailoring. Gleaming grey cashmeres and buttery slate wools made for a clean, urban canvas to showcase everything from straight-cut cabans and anoraks to sharp-shouldered business suits. The novelty here was all of the classic business blends, from dark, chic Prince of Wales checks to boardroom pinstripes and grey tweeds that flecked just as many overcoats as they did cozy oversized sweaters

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Fendi

Unsurprisingly, there were some excellent fur pieces at the Fendi Men’s presentation — coyote looking anoraks and foxy après-ski boots that could do a double circuit between St. Moritz and central London without missing a beat. But the big news this season was how un-furry and un-leathery the collection was and, rather, what a wonderful treaty it was on chic, modern tailoring. Gleaming grey cashmeres and buttery slate wools made for a clean, urban canvas to showcase everything from straight-cut cabans and anoraks to sharp-shouldered business suits. The novelty here was all of the classic business blends, from dark, chic Prince of Wales checks to boardroom pinstripes and grey tweeds that flecked just as many overcoats as they did cozy oversized sweaters

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Fendi

Unsurprisingly, there were some excellent fur pieces at the Fendi Men’s presentation — coyote looking anoraks and foxy après-ski boots that could do a double circuit between St. Moritz and central London without missing a beat. But the big news this season was how un-furry and un-leathery the collection was and, rather, what a wonderful treaty it was on chic, modern tailoring. Gleaming grey cashmeres and buttery slate wools made for a clean, urban canvas to showcase everything from straight-cut cabans and anoraks to sharp-shouldered business suits. The novelty here was all of the classic business blends, from dark, chic Prince of Wales checks to boardroom pinstripes and grey tweeds that flecked just as many overcoats as they did cozy oversized sweaters

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Fendi

Unsurprisingly, there were some excellent fur pieces at the Fendi Men’s presentation — coyote looking anoraks and foxy après-ski boots that could do a double circuit between St. Moritz and central London without missing a beat. But the big news this season was how un-furry and un-leathery the collection was and, rather, what a wonderful treaty it was on chic, modern tailoring. Gleaming grey cashmeres and buttery slate wools made for a clean, urban canvas to showcase everything from straight-cut cabans and anoraks to sharp-shouldered business suits. The novelty here was all of the classic business blends, from dark, chic Prince of Wales checks to boardroom pinstripes and grey tweeds that flecked just as many overcoats as they did cozy oversized sweaters

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Brioni

The appointment is officially a hit. Brendan Mullane, the newly installed creative director at Brioni, proved he has not only the design chops to steer a brand as sartorially savvy as Brioni, but also the creative bells and whistles to package it all up in a modern, crisp and impactful presentation. Mullane, who comes from the very edgy rim of men's fashion - his last tenure was at Givenchy - showed that he has enough range to conceive something special for the sort of man who commands a sprawling corner office. The cool mix of sharp suiting and roughened-up outerwear was a main theme, not to mention the canvas upon which Mullane drew his technical gifts and detail obsessions. The entire presentation, which took place in Milan's majestic Palazzo Serbelloni, was exactly the kind of thing we look for in the middle of an overly-committed, high-octane week: razor sharp, finely honed and crystal clear in its beautiful executed message. This is definitely a brand to watch

Words: J.J Martin

Brioni

The appointment is officially a hit. Brendan Mullane, the newly installed creative director at Brioni, proved he has not only the design chops to steer a brand as sartorially savvy as Brioni, but also the creative bells and whistles to package it all up in a modern, crisp and impactful presentation. Mullane, who comes from the very edgy rim of men's fashion - his last tenure was at Givenchy - showed that he has enough range to conceive something special for the sort of man who commands a sprawling corner office. The cool mix of sharp suiting and roughened-up outerwear was a main theme, not to mention the canvas upon which Mullane drew his technical gifts and detail obsessions. The entire presentation, which took place in Milan's majestic Palazzo Serbelloni, was exactly the kind of thing we look for in the middle of an overly-committed, high-octane week: razor sharp, finely honed and crystal clear in its beautiful executed message. This is definitely a brand to watch

Words: J.J Martin

Brioni

The appointment is officially a hit. Brendan Mullane, the newly installed creative director at Brioni, proved he has not only the design chops to steer a brand as sartorially savvy as Brioni, but also the creative bells and whistles to package it all up in a modern, crisp and impactful presentation. Mullane, who comes from the very edgy rim of men's fashion - his last tenure was at Givenchy - showed that he has enough range to conceive something special for the sort of man who commands a sprawling corner office. The cool mix of sharp suiting and roughened-up outerwear was a main theme, not to mention the canvas upon which Mullane drew his technical gifts and detail obsessions. The entire presentation, which took place in Milan's majestic Palazzo Serbelloni, was exactly the kind of thing we look for in the middle of an overly-committed, high-octane week: razor sharp, finely honed and crystal clear in its beautiful executed message. This is definitely a brand to watch

Words: J.J Martin

Brioni

The appointment is officially a hit. Brendan Mullane, the newly installed creative director at Brioni, proved he has not only the design chops to steer a brand as sartorially savvy as Brioni, but also the creative bells and whistles to package it all up in a modern, crisp and impactful presentation. Mullane, who comes from the very edgy rim of men's fashion - his last tenure was at Givenchy - showed that he has enough range to conceive something special for the sort of man who commands a sprawling corner office. The cool mix of sharp suiting and roughened-up outerwear was a main theme, not to mention the canvas upon which Mullane drew his technical gifts and detail obsessions. The entire presentation, which took place in Milan's majestic Palazzo Serbelloni, was exactly the kind of thing we look for in the middle of an overly-committed, high-octane week: razor sharp, finely honed and crystal clear in its beautiful executed message. This is definitely a brand to watch

Words: J.J Martin
 

 

Brioni

The appointment is officially a hit. Brendan Mullane, the newly installed creative director at Brioni, proved he has not only the design chops to steer a brand as sartorially savvy as Brioni, but also the creative bells and whistles to package it all up in a modern, crisp and impactful presentation. Mullane, who comes from the very edgy rim of men's fashion - his last tenure was at Givenchy - showed that he has enough range to conceive something special for the sort of man who commands a sprawling corner office. The cool mix of sharp suiting and roughened-up outerwear was a main theme, not to mention the canvas upon which Mullane drew his technical gifts and detail obsessions. The entire presentation, which took place in Milan's majestic Palazzo Serbelloni, was exactly the kind of thing we look for in the middle of an overly-committed, high-octane week: razor sharp, finely honed and crystal clear in its beautiful executed message. This is definitely a brand to watch

Words: J.J Martin

Giorgio Armani

Giorgio Armani's hot colour on his Fall runway was the exact same shade as a red velvet cupcake. Decadent and rich, he used the blood-red tone on slim evening jackets as well as a sporty set of trousers whose intensity was mellowed by a series of woolly grey cable knit sweaters. Of course, Armani is known for his knack with neutrals, and the warm greys and tobacco browns did not disappoint, finely sewn up with a new matte finish on technical fabrics, classic wools and precious leathers. Other notable news came in the form of his ultra-skinny trouser shape that clung to the models' calves like snuggly knits, and the unlimited choice of man bags on offer. From totes, clutches and handbags, to briefcases, suitcases and duffle bags, the only thing that beat the quantity of shapes was, perhaps, the sheer number of materials on offer - like velvet, leather, crocodile and suede. Looks like the discerning man is going to have to be vying for more closet space with his significant other next season.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Giorgio Armani

Giorgio Armani's hot colour on his Fall runway was the exact same shade as a red velvet cupcake. Decadent and rich, he used the blood-red tone on slim evening jackets as well as a sporty set of trousers whose intensity was mellowed by a series of woolly grey cable knit sweaters. Of course, Armani is known for his knack with neutrals, and the warm greys and tobacco browns did not disappoint, finely sewn up with a new matte finish on technical fabrics, classic wools and precious leathers. Other notable news came in the form of his ultra-skinny trouser shape that clung to the models' calves like snuggly knits, and the unlimited choice of man bags on offer. From totes, clutches and handbags, to briefcases, suitcases and duffle bags, the only thing that beat the quantity of shapes was, perhaps, the sheer number of materials on offer - like velvet, leather, crocodile and suede. Looks like the discerning man is going to have to be vying for more closet space with his significant other next season.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Giorgio Armani

Giorgio Armani's hot colour on his Fall runway was the exact same shade as a red velvet cupcake. Decadent and rich, he used the blood-red tone on slim evening jackets as well as a sporty set of trousers whose intensity was mellowed by a series of woolly grey cable knit sweaters. Of course, Armani is known for his knack with neutrals, and the warm greys and tobacco browns did not disappoint, finely sewn up with a new matte finish on technical fabrics, classic wools and precious leathers. Other notable news came in the form of his ultra-skinny trouser shape that clung to the models' calves like snuggly knits, and the unlimited choice of man bags on offer. From totes, clutches and handbags, to briefcases, suitcases and duffle bags, the only thing that beat the quantity of shapes was, perhaps, the sheer number of materials on offer - like velvet, leather, crocodile and suede. Looks like the discerning man is going to have to be vying for more closet space with his significant other next season.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Giorgio Armani

Giorgio Armani's hot colour on his Fall runway was the exact same shade as a red velvet cupcake. Decadent and rich, he used the blood-red tone on slim evening jackets as well as a sporty set of trousers whose intensity was mellowed by a series of woolly grey cable knit sweaters. Of course, Armani is known for his knack with neutrals, and the warm greys and tobacco browns did not disappoint, finely sewn up with a new matte finish on technical fabrics, classic wools and precious leathers. Other notable news came in the form of his ultra-skinny trouser shape that clung to the models' calves like snuggly knits, and the unlimited choice of man bags on offer. From totes, clutches and handbags, to briefcases, suitcases and duffle bags, the only thing that beat the quantity of shapes was, perhaps, the sheer number of materials on offer - like velvet, leather, crocodile and suede. Looks like the discerning man is going to have to be vying for more closet space with his significant other next season.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Giorgio Armani

Giorgio Armani's hot colour on his Fall runway was the exact same shade as a red velvet cupcake. Decadent and rich, he used the blood-red tone on slim evening jackets as well as a sporty set of trousers whose intensity was mellowed by a series of woolly grey cable knit sweaters. Of course, Armani is known for his knack with neutrals, and the warm greys and tobacco browns did not disappoint, finely sewn up with a new matte finish on technical fabrics, classic wools and precious leathers. Other notable news came in the form of his ultra-skinny trouser shape that clung to the models' calves like snuggly knits, and the unlimited choice of man bags on offer. From totes, clutches and handbags, to briefcases, suitcases and duffle bags, the only thing that beat the quantity of shapes was, perhaps, the sheer number of materials on offer - like velvet, leather, crocodile and suede. Looks like the discerning man is going to have to be vying for more closet space with his significant other next season.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Diesel Black Gold

Diesel's premiere line gave itself the ambitious task of outfitting a psychedelic rock band on a world tour. If that wasn't enough, it also promised to throw in a cosmic twist, using astrological references in the array of on-and-off-the-stage fashion designs. Apart from the tour T-Shirts, shrivelled leather trousers, shrunken velvet jackets and Jimi Hendrix Mongolian fur coats, we learnt a few new lessons in symbolic style. The hexagon for example is code word for the planet Saturn (good for relaxing a highly-strung artist), while the paisley (they claimed) got everyone in a 1960s séance sort of mood.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

Diesel Black Gold

Diesel's premiere line gave itself the ambitious task of outfitting a psychedelic rock band on a world tour. If that wasn't enough, it also promised to throw in a cosmic twist, using astrological references in the array of on-and-off-the-stage fashion designs. Apart from the tour T-Shirts, shrivelled leather trousers, shrunken velvet jackets and Jimi Hendrix Mongolian fur coats, we learnt a few new lessons in symbolic style. The hexagon for example is code word for the planet Saturn (good for relaxing a highly-strung artist), while the paisley (they claimed) got everyone in a 1960s séance sort of mood.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Diesel Black Gold

Diesel's premiere line gave itself the ambitious task of outfitting a psychedelic rock band on a world tour. If that wasn't enough, it also promised to throw in a cosmic twist, using astrological references in the array of on-and-off-the-stage fashion designs. Apart from the tour T-Shirts, shrivelled leather trousers, shrunken velvet jackets and Jimi Hendrix Mongolian fur coats, we learnt a few new lessons in symbolic style. The hexagon for example is code word for the planet Saturn (good for relaxing a highly-strung artist), while the paisley (they claimed) got everyone in a 1960s séance sort of mood.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Diesel Black Gold

Diesel's premiere line gave itself the ambitious task of outfitting a psychedelic rock band on a world tour. If that wasn't enough, it also promised to throw in a cosmic twist, using astrological references in the array of on-and-off-the-stage fashion designs. Apart from the tour T-Shirts, shrivelled leather trousers, shrunken velvet jackets and Jimi Hendrix Mongolian fur coats, we learnt a few new lessons in symbolic style. The hexagon for example is code word for the planet Saturn (good for relaxing a highly-strung artist), while the paisley (they claimed) got everyone in a 1960s séance sort of mood.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Diesel Black Gold

Diesel's premiere line gave itself the ambitious task of outfitting a psychedelic rock band on a world tour. If that wasn't enough, it also promised to throw in a cosmic twist, using astrological references in the array of on-and-off-the-stage fashion designs. Apart from the tour T-Shirts, shrivelled leather trousers, shrunken velvet jackets and Jimi Hendrix Mongolian fur coats, we learnt a few new lessons in symbolic style. The hexagon for example is code word for the planet Saturn (good for relaxing a highly-strung artist), while the paisley (they claimed) got everyone in a 1960s séance sort of mood.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin

 

Jil Sander

A lethal shot of pure, distilled cranberry in her first look out proved that Ms. Sander is right back on her A game at her namesake label. An intriguing colour narrative - especially in a later exploration of green that saw an olive coat paired with sage slim trousers and an emerald calfskin tote - was just one of many subtle details that nodded to a new, meticulous elegance normally associated with womenswear. Take the shaved fur collars and cuffs, for example, the former of which coddled necks like precious vintage couture. Or the two-tone sleeveless jumpers that fell like 1960s tunics over pin-straight trousers cropped above the ankle. The mood, however, stayed manly, thanks to Sander's deft reinterpretation of classic pinstripes and tartans, both of which became abstracted like blurred paintings on cascading coats and short sharply-tailored jackets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans Words: J.J Martin


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