Margaret Howell

There is plenty for Margaret Howell fans to like in her new collection. For Fall, Howell has let the cloth and yarn do the talking, focusing the limelight on lightly-textured tweeds, jumbo cord, flecked wools and fluid silks. Detail is authentic and unfussy yet precisely considered - like the loafers in waxy leather, which featured longer lasts; or the cream collar and cuffs that finished off a white poplin shirt. What Howell shows is always gracious and relaxed, with 'waists' slung just at the hips, and slim silhouettes cut to fit just away from the body. The collection was heavy on outerwear, and it also featured plenty of pleats in dresses, skirts and kilts, which were especially fresh in a washed silk. Some very desirable knits - the speckled cashmere roll necks, carried over from last winter and now in shades of grey and navy - will delight those who have already bought them and want to go back for more of the same
 

Margaret Howell

Margaret Howell

Margaret Howell

Margaret Howell

Richard Nicoll

Richard Nicoll's Fall collection comprised rectilinear shapes and crisp tailoring, which sharpened up silk shirts and collarless dresses. And where there was an air of the sensible in the grey shifts on offer, there there was also a flash of feistiness, thanks to electric-blue pleats. Colours included blocks of white, grey, yellow, blue and burnt orange. Nicoll also introduced a novel piece of kit to ring the working woman's bell - a tote bag that cleverly charges your phone on the go
 

Richard Nicoll

Richard Nicoll

Richard Nicoll

Richard Nicoll

Marios Schwab

An assured and hauntingly beautiful Fall collection - manifested in the wide-brimmed hats, elbow-length gloves and leather trench coats - evoked Marios Schwab's enigmatic 1920s film noir aesthetic inspired by Marlene Dietrich. Notable, was the way in which Schwab decorated his sheer and seductive outfits with a variety of mathematical spirograph patterns. Accompanied by a dramatic string-instrument soundtrack, the atmospheric greens, browns and blacks formed a collection that came together brilliantly to confirm Schwab's prowess at celebrating female curves and sensuality
 

Marios Schwab

Marios Schwab

Marios Schwab

Marios Schwab

Paul Smith

Paul Smith has taken the traditional gents' smoking attire - robes, jackets, slippers and all - and made it work for women. Shawl collared robes were wrapped tightly against the torso and blazers cut in cashmere were tucked into pleat-front pyjama pants. There were plenty of what Smith called 'inappropriate mixes' in the pattern, colour and fabrication, as well as 'the rough with the smooth' - meaning combinations like Harris tweed and silk brocade. It's not the first time the designer worked the smoking story, nor for that matter borrowing from the boys, but, as he aptly put it, it's about nudges rather than shoves
 

Paul Smith

Paul Smith

Paul Smith

Paul Smith

Jonathan Saunders

Jonathan Saunders trained as a textile designer at Central Saint Martins, which would explain why his simply-shaped clothes have so much appeal, whether on the runway or hanging in-store. His focus is totally on combining colour, pattern and texture. His colour choices always work a treat and there is an adept mix of pattern and scale, with some of the embossed and quilted patterns demonstrating his dexterity at working in three dimensions. This was a very geometric collection where cuts were angular. Except for leather belts that traced the contours of hips and waists, and the leather visors framing the models' brows, there was not a curve in sight
 

Jonathan Saunders

Jonathan Saunders

Jonathan Saunders

Jonathan Saunders

Louise Gray

Louise Gray says her Fall collection 'is about everything, all the time'. That is a good way of describing the visual feast (or riot) of each and every look. Complex colours, optical pattern, 'radio wave' zigzags, distorted camouflage, swirling PVC foil prints, rewoven strips of graffiti, patchwork, rubber printed sequins, unravelling knitwear, bubble-wrap gloves and bras, and Mowhawk headdresses by Nasir Mazhar could all be found on the same look, and that is what makes this so exciting, fresh and different. Gray has no fear just a whole lot of talent and energy

 

Louise Gray

Louise Gray

Louise Gray

Louise Gray

Acne

The Acne colour card gave this collection one of its many dimensions. Spotted, were eye-popping combinations such as fleshy pinks and beige, contrasted with poppy red, kelly green and bordeaux. The mix of hard and soft fabrics, like the stiff vinyls and cotton gabardine with padded nylon, wadded knit and pressed wools, gave it another dimension. But it was the hardcore strictness - waists cinched in with wide belts; uncomfortable-looking neck-brace-cum-chokers in flesh-coloured rubber - that emphasised this extreme toughness and softness working side by side. The belts gathered in volumes of fabric back into the body, just as grommets held asymmetrical pleats and gathers in place and the chokers elongated the line of the neck
 

Acne

Acne

Acne

Acne

Peter Pilotto

Designers Peter Pilotto and Christopher de Vos work vivid, colourful digital prints right into the highly feminine cuts of their clothing, criss-crossing the torso and following the shape of the derriere. Photographs are recomposed, florals are abstracted and layer upon layer of different lines are placed diagonally and mirror-like on garments. For Fall, photographs of Japanese 'light' trucks were manipulated to create a pattern that ended up looking like Art Déco jewellery. The duo are always searching for new ways to repurpose pattern and print, so the new highlight this season was the outerwear - snug and chic down jackets produced by a specialist in Austria and multi-coloured fox fur, fashioned into scarves resembling giant fluffy Liquorice Allsorts. This season was a natural progression from Spring and, judging by the beaming power buyers from Net-A-Porter, Dover Street Market and 10 Corso Como sitting opposite us, these two are on a roll
 

Peter Pilotto

Peter Pilotto

Peter Pilotto

Peter Pilotto

Pringle of Scotland

Alistair Carr, now in his second season at Pringle of Scotland, is steering the brand in a very modern direction, and keeping knitwear at the forefront. Case in point, the fully fashioned cashmere batwing-sleeved dress with just the right amount of volume that opened the show: clever placement of graphic intarsia-patterned panels made it appear as if the model was wearing a little black cardigan over the top, a kind of play on the twinset. Everything classic had a little twist to it, like the box pleat skirts that moved to reveal they were slashed open, the twinsets in diametric rib and the Astrakhan fur that actually turned out to be knitted. There was ‘defiance in the detailing’, which carried on into the intense colour-tipped hair too. Candy-coloured angora, bubble-gum pink and mint green collars, as well as the red orange of a full grain leather bomber jacket, offset the black, grey, camel and bottle green hues on offer
 

Pringle of Scotland

Pringle of Scotland

Pringle of Scotland

Pringle of Scotland

Christopher Kane

Using relatively straight-forward cuts, Christopher Kane manages to create excitement through texture, decor and colour use. Over acres of wall-to-wall lilac carpet laid out in a vacant office floor at Jean Nouvel’s One New Change, Kane introduced a collection layered with purple, violet, blood red, royal blue and plenty of black. There was a grungy feel and a ‘mish mash’ of fabrications including funeral moiré, mink intarsia, denim, furry angora and a kind of punky chain-mail embroidery applied over cashmere knits. Pattern included a new way with florals crafted in mink, and leopard which was executed in tonnes of purple, lilac and black. Kane cited the underground world of leather looks from William Friedkin's Cruising as a major reference, so naturally leather featured quite strongly. The material was over-printed with white pinstripes for a tailoring look and the use of a chunky tubular piping rim added a 3D element to garments
 

Christopher Kane

Christopher Kane

Christopher Kane

Christopher Kane

Christopher Kane

Burberry Prorsum

The hips are not usually an area that women want to draw attention to, but that is exactly where Christopher Bailey placed his focus this season. The designer bellowed out hunters' pockets with ample gussets, while striped jersey dirndl skirts and sculpted peplums were paired with tiny waists and very fitted torsos. With this concentration on cinched waists, even an extremely padded, short, two-tone duvet coat was still slimming. Fabrication was rich in wools, with speckled tweeds, houndstooth checks and herringbone. The show was titled 'Town and Field', and this difference in the two worlds was apparent throughout: pieces either featured velvet trimmings, chinchilla and satin bows, or came with bridle leather straps, quilting, and cord, and gold hardware cast with foxes' heads on belt buckles and bags. The wildlife theme also turned up on adorable T-Shirts. Most wanted (at least by us) were the owls
 

Burberry Prorsum

Burberry Prorsum

Burberry Prorsum

Burberry Prorsum

Burberry Prorsum

McQ Alexander Mcqueen

If Alexander McQueen's diffusion line has been perceived as a lesser sibling, then last night's show will have quashed this in one fell swoop. The tour de force of McQ's first runway show - debuted on an expansive golden-hued carpet of (real) autumn leaves in London's Old Sorting Office - was punctuated with sharp tailoring, intricate embellishment and an assured use of pattern and material. Stand-outs among the texture-rich collection came in the form of a sequence of military-inspired wool overcoats cinched tightly at the waist, knitwear featuring giant knit detail and multi-layered tulle dresses covered with a colour burst of appliqué flowers. But the theatrics didn't end at the clothes. Clad in a luminescent white lace dress, model Kristen McMenamy closed the show by extracting a rope from beneath the leaves and used it to gradually pull herself across the runway to the edge of a magical forest set (which until then had been concealed behind a wall). Passing through the trees, she entered an intriguing shed-like cabin, where she stayed, concealed, as pumping rave music reverberated around the Old Sorting Office, and models emerged from the autumnal wonderland for their finale.

Watch the action, as captured from the front row, here
 

McQ Alexander Mcqueen

McQ Alexander Mcqueen

McQ Alexander Mcqueen

McQ Alexander Mcqueen

Mary Katrantzou

Those familiar with Mary Katrantzou's way with print will know her subject matter is usually rich and rather baroque - think photographs of Meissen, Ming vases, Lalique crystal and interiors at Versailles, all digitally remastered and placed over her restrictive, corseted silhouette. This time, however, she elevated the everyday and worked the mundane into her digital tableaux. Cutlery, typewriter keys, coat hangers, chess pieces, tape measures, and guitars all got the Katrantzou treatment. Through her kaleidoscopic eyes, a simple domestic lawn and hedge reads as a maze, while yellow pencils are transformed into gloriously rich repeating pattern. Better still, real pencils were cut-up and embroidered, with their pink rubber tops, onto a skirt (by Lesage, no less), giving new meaning to the concept of a pencil skirt. Katrantzou had the front row literally on the edge of their seats, craning their necks to see what was coming next. Joy from Mary Queen of prints

Mary Katrantzou

Mary Katrantzou

Mary Katrantzou

Mary Katrantzou

Mary Katrantzou

Roksanda Ilincic

Roksanda Ilincic has developed quite a following for her dressed-up looks, offering a kind of modern minimal take on couture shapes. This season, she veered into leisure and weekend territory. Don’t worry, there is still plenty of eveningwear in the showroom, though, and she dressed up the sportier jersey looks with fox or Astrakhan fur, while dressing down the embroidered pieces with hoods and ribbed cuffs. Ilincic likes to play with texture, so a dress or jacket might have several different fabrications all in the same shade. There was also some borrowing from men's wardrobes, such as over-scale boyfriend coats and jackets, and men's cloth like soft wool melton and thick wool, re-interpreted with gold threads and mixed with more feminine cupro and silk
 

Roksanda Ilincic

Roksanda Ilincic

Roksanda Ilincic

Roksanda Ilincic

Margaret Howell

There is plenty for Margaret Howell fans to like in her new collection. For Fall, Howell has let the cloth and yarn do the talking, focusing the limelight on lightly-textured tweeds, jumbo cord, flecked wools and fluid silks. Detail is authentic and unfussy yet precisely considered - like the loafers in waxy leather, which featured longer lasts; or the cream collar and cuffs that finished off a white poplin shirt. What Howell shows is always gracious and relaxed, with 'waists' slung just at the hips, and slim silhouettes cut to fit just away from the body. The collection was heavy on outerwear, and it also featured plenty of pleats in dresses, skirts and kilts, which were especially fresh in a washed silk. Some very desirable knits - the speckled cashmere roll necks, carried over from last winter and now in shades of grey and navy - will delight those who have already bought them and want to go back for more of the same
 


Twitter feed

  • twitter-blank

    This Twitter feed has now expired

  • twitter-blank

    This Twitter feed has now expired

  • twitter-blank

    This Twitter feed has now expired

  • twitter-blank

    This Twitter feed has now expired



Past shows


Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Google Plus Follow us on Tumblr