'Our aim was to show the porcelain in ordinary places and everyday situations, away from the aesthetics of a studio or a stylised interior,' notes the Polish-born, London-based photographer Kasia Bobula of the photographs she has taken of designer Maria Jeglinska's 'Nathalie & George' porcelain tea set. Using the backdrop of a typical London flat, the striking pieces are juxtaposed with their casual surrounds – an everyday kitchen sponge, plastic soap dispenser, and the leaves of a house plant pepper the background. 'We approached the shoot in a relaxed manner and with a sense of humour – two qualities that are essential to the aesthetics of Nathalie & George,' says Jeglinska.

The collection, decorated with bold Memphis-esque patterns (a tribute to Memphis designers and the tea set's namesakes Nathalie du Pasquier and George Sowden), is the outcome of a 2013 collaboration with Porcelana Kristoff, a traditional porcelain factory based in Walbrzych, Poland. 'The new owners asked me to design a new pattern for one of the company’s porcelain sets,' explains Jeglinska, who, although born and raised in Warsaw, has spent much of her career working in Zurich, Paris and London. '[They] wanted to reinstate a forgotten tradition of the the firm’s cooperation with artists and designers.'

Consisting of a teapot, sugarbowl, teacup, bowl, creamer, an egg cup and plates of two sizes, the set features two contrasting surface patterns. 'Looking for the ‘right’ motif, I produced a large stack of sketches and drawings,' says Jeglinska. 'After a while, I began to juxtapose my sketches side by side and discovered that the contrast produced by two different motifs was far more interesting than simply repeating the same pattern on each element of the set.'