Jasper Morrison's concept of 'Super Normal' has found new resonance at Stockholm Furniture Fair. 

The British designer has created two new tables and a sofa for the Danish furniture brand Fredericia, all three of which were presented on the stand he constructed and curated himself. 

Largely inspired by the brand's founding designer Børge Mogensen, Morrison's new designs are true to his 'Super Normal' concept, penned in conjunction with Naoto Fukasawa in 2007 as 'the the result of a long tradition of evolutionary advancement in the shape of everyday things, not attempting to break with the history of form but rather trying to summarise it'. (I.e. good design should aspire as much as possible to be invisible, serving their function so effortlessly that they become seamlessly, intuitively become part of our lives and world.)

'Mogensen, I now realise, is the quintessential Danish designer,' notes Morrison, 'capable of creating understated and beautifully proportioned furniture for living the good life – 'super normal' before the term existed.'

The tables are made with their corresponding environments in mind. Constructed from solid, knotless wood in Mogensen's tradition, the 'Taro' dining table comes in three different sizes, each robust and intended for everyday use.

Smaller in scale but equally sturdy, the 'Pon' side tables made of oak and ash can double up as stools too. Completing the trifecta of furniture is the 'Kile' sofa, built on a solid wooden frame and upholstered in cold-cured foam. 

To showcase Fredericia's new launches – including pieces by Space Copenhagen and Hugo Passos – Morrison's stand design lays forward his vision of how the collection could and should be presented in his spirit. 

'Jasper Morrison’s design appeals in particular to our inherited understanding of good design,' said Fredericia owner and design director Thomas Graversen. 'At the same time, he is one of the most forward-thinking of contemporary designers. On several occasions, Morrison has successfully developed what have come to be heralded as modern archetypes, all without undue aesthetic noise.'