In the dawn of 2010 we brought you news of the sixth Sovereign Asian Art Prize, profiling each of the 30 finalist's work. Last week, at a gala dinner held at the Four Seasons Hong Kong, Korean artist Debbie Han was voted the winner by the jury for her piece 'Seated Three Graces'.
Han's piece, which took two years to complete portrays three, nude women, seated as marble statues in a classical pose. Her method was to photograph real bodies of Asian women, add typically classical heads to their bodies and then create a digital rendering to achieve the marble, sculpture effect. Her purpose was to highlight the 'Eurocentric' standard of beauty in classical and contemporary art.
Han was awarded $25,000 as the winner by the jury, which included Chinese artist Xu Bing, Fumio Nanjo, Director of the Mori Art Museum and curator David Elliott. The remaining 29 artworks were auctioned off over the evening raising nearly HK$2 million, half of which goes to the artists, with the other half going back into the foundation.

'Sha-Boy' by Miguel Payano, winner of the Schoeni public prize
In addition to the main prize, the public was also granted its say, casting votes through the Foundation's website. They chose Miguel Payano, an artist based in China as the recipient of the Schoeni public prize for his painting 'Sha-Boy'. Hong Kong artist Angela Su's work 'Homunculus - Exhibit H, I, J' received the highest bid at the auction of HK$273,000.

'Homunculus - Exhibit H, I, J' by Angela Su, the work that received the highest bid at auction
We grabbed a few minutes with judge David Elliott to talk about the prize - its significance and how the judging panned out. We also spoke to Debbie Han to find out why she thought she'd been singled out of the pack...