Private jet enterprise NetJets enlisted British artist Rebecca Louise Law to create an installation for their Collectors’ Lounge during Art Basel.

Unveiled earlier this week, Law’s Growth installation is suspended from the lounge’s ceiling, featuring a selection of over 15 species of preserved flowers sculpted and entwined with copper wire. Appearing like an upside-down meadow, Law’s piece gives a soft addition to the lounge, offering collectors an experience that combines art and nature. Using 7,500 flowers covering a surface of over 100 sq m (and installed with over 100 hours of labour by Law and her team), the artist’s composition is both poetic and strongly present.

The artist’s work plays with the relationship between man and nature, using dried flowers as a preferred medium, which she has arranged in infinite compositions since starting out in 2003. Previous commissions have proved the versatility of her work: Law’s pieces have in the past enriched commercial spaces with a large-scale installation presented at Bikini Berlin earlier this year, and a different iteration of her flowerscapes unveiled in Melbourne’s Eastland shopping mall on 22 June. Other site-specific installations currently on show include Drying, at the Luton Hoo Estate, and The City Garden, an installation of flowers inspired by gardens throughout the City of London.

The NetJets piece, which will be dismantled after a week in Basel and reinstalled in Miami next December, features a composition of helichrysums, daisies and globe thistles, applied at varying densities and heights. It will also be installed inside one of the company’s private jets, taking Law’s exploration of nature one step further, by presenting it in juxtaposition with a wider concept of machine and speed.