Ezra Stoller is one of the 20th century's most acclaimed photographers of Modern and Midcentury architecture. A new book and exhibition is set to throw fresh light on his oeuvre, showing his well-known architectural photographs alongside little seen works fuelled by his own personal interests.

Digging into Stoller's archive of more than 50,000 images, the book 'Ezra Stoller: Photographer' (published by Yale University Press) presents the Chicago-born photographer's industrial and domestic work. This sits side by side with his better-known images of Modernist architecture, showing the breadth of his output. It is penned by curator Nina Rappaport and Erica Stoller (the photographer's daughter and director of their agency, Esto).

The book is a timely precursor to the exhibition Beyond Architecture, which opens at the Yossi Milo Gallery in New York in January. Aiming to capture a 'lost America', it features visuals taken all around the country, from workers in Queens to conveyor belts at the Heinz factory.  

Together they show a new perspective of post-war America, while also offering some of the images that helped define the cultural memory of mid-century design.