For its inaugural exhibition that marks the taking over of a brand new space in Kings Cross, All Visual Arts have commissioned two new works by artists Alice Anderson and Kate MccGuire, both of which deal with the idea of deep-seated fears and anxieties. Running along a similar vein of repetition and pattern as abstract concepts, the two giant sculptures work to effectively punctuate the shadowed warehouse space.

'Corvid', MccGuire's sculpture, is an enlarged and disfigured representation of a bird. Massed into a dark winding snake-like formation with no visible beginning or end, its form acts as a subconscious cue for the way we sometimes see fear birds. MccGuire, who employs the large-scale use of pigeon, mallard, magpie and crows' plumage in her current body of work, used feathers belonging only to crows for this piece - a deliberate choice with disquieting effect, if you think about this particular breed's association in folklore with thieving and deviant behaviour.

Anderson's narrative-driven 'Fort-Da' alludes to her childhood rituals, in which she also tries to symbolise the relationship between mother and child. The installation replicates Sigmund Freud's observation of a game his grandson would play - repeatedly throwing a wooden reel attached to a piece of string over his cot and retrieving it - an action which allowed the then one-year-old infant to adapt to the anxiety caused by his mother's absence. Anderson's version consists of a 3m-high bobbin wound round with ropes of red dolls hair - the confrontation of her own childhood anxiety, seen through the compulsive winding of doll's hair around the bobbin.