The Argentinian artist Analia Saban arrives at Sprüth Magers in London with a fresh recommendation from John Baldessari. Last month, the LA-art scene’s grand patriarch picked out Saban as one of city’s ten bright young things for Wallpaper*.

Saban’s new show, ‘Interiors’, talks about domestic materiality, the stuff that surrounds us, as we once had it. But Saban’s is an alternative universe where marble hangs over a sawhorse like a soggy towel (though not happily and disintegrating in the process).

Claim (from Chesterfield Sofa) is a conjoined canvas and sofa in a single benign, unthreatening beige. Art about art as interior decoration. Some things come together in this imagined house, others fall apart, or shift out of focus. In Fade Out (Bouquet of Flowers, in Ten Steps) a series of ten still lives, a line drawing of a bunch of flowers grows blurred and indistinct until it is nothing but a Rorschach test blobs, in which you may see flowers and you may not. In Bulge, a bare white canvas swells horrific or comically inflates. In Markings (from Paint Storage), the emulsion from a photograph of paints pots on shelves is scraped away but splashes across an adjacent frame.

‘Interiors’ questions material and formal logic, our preconceptions about material and form, the right thing for the job. And it makes for a shaky, shaken kind of space.

TAGS: SPRÜTH MAGERS