In our October issue we previewed a new show by London's Institute of Contemporary Arts which aims to connect the dots between London's contemporary creative culture, generally agreed to be in very rude health, and that of the 1980s, another period of intense subcultural activity. Described by ICA director Gregor Muir as a 'form of subcultural archeology', 'A Journey through London's Subculture: 1980s to Now' has been co-curated by design historian Emily King, music writer Princess Julia and design gallerist Libby Sellers, and has just opened at the Old Selfridges Hotel.

Over 50 of the city's creative bright lights, past and present and stretching from Zaha Hadid to Bethan Laura Wood, have been asked to fill vitrines with personal paraphernalia, a physical record of their creative lives. The visitor can then, hopefully, spot shared tricks and tropes and common threads. Of course, we couldn't resist getting involved and, as well as being media partner of the event, have helped our friend Tom Dixon put together his trove of treasures.

The designer rose to prominence in the 1980s but, when not in his studio, also found time to play base in the band Funkapolitan, model for Comme des Garçons and run club nights Language Lab and Demolition Derby. His vitrine features a carefully picked selection of ephemera from the era.

Tom Dixon gives us a look inside his 'Funkapolitan' cuttings book

The show will also include video works, installations and billboard-sized images and will be accompanied by a series of events and talks, including a conversation with Tom Dixon hosted by our own Simon Mills.