Launched in conjunction with a three-part documentary of the same name on the BBC, the new exhibition at the RIBA entitled 'The Brits Who Built The Modern World' celebrates the generation of British architects who launched the High-tech architectural movement in the 20th century. The show is presented through a wealth of drawings, models, photographs and videos in the sleek and streamlined addition to the RIBA's display halls on the ground floor, designed by award-winning London practice Carmody Groarke.

Focusing on the work of seminal British architects Norman Foster, Richard Rogers, Terry Farrell, Nicholas Grimshaw and Michael and Patti Hopkins, the show explores the historical, social, economic and architectural context that fueled one of the most characteristic architectural approaches of the 20th century.

These architects - born within five years of each other in the 1930s - played a critical role in defining today's British architecture and contributing immensely to its current international success. Through a series of landmark buildings across a globe, the group became protagonists in the High-tech movement, whose industrial nature came as a response to Modernism's dominant concrete at the time. 

 

The show is complemented by two further exhibitions: 'New British Voices: Today and Tomorrow' is on display at RIBA's first floor galleries and investigates current international projects by 17 British based practices, while 'Empire Builders: 1750-1950' at the V&A looks back to the history of British building abroad. 

TAGS: RIBA