Nestled on a quiet road close to the beach, in a west coast seaside location in Mexico’s Jalisco state, this new home – the renovation and complete redesign of an existing 1960s house – by Milan-based architect Peter Pichler is a holiday home with a strong visual presence.

The house may appear fairly narrow from the street, but there’s depth to its plot; and its long volume is cleverly broken down by three atria, placed at the centre and back of the site. These ensure natural light gets into all the spaces, no matter how far removed from the street. The open space and double height ceiling near the building’s main entrance also helps towards that.

The internal division is fairly straightforward. The ground level features the public areas of the house – living, kitchen and bathrooms, as well as two guest bedrooms, discreetly tucked away at the back of the plot.

The upper level hosts the bedrooms (the master suite opens to a balcony facing a small internal courtyard, to protect the residents from prying eyes) and a further two bathrooms. A generous terrace facing the seaside makes for the perfect spot for relaxing, while taking in views of the Pacific Ocean. Large openings on both levels can be entirely closed off using white aluminium shutters, if privacy or shading is needed.

The house’s most eye-catching feature, however, is its richly patterned façade. Covered in customised handmade tiles, produced locally and inspired by traditional Mexican motifs, the volume of the house becomes playful, brimming with colour and movement. Yet, the building's sober overall geometries ensure this doesn't become overwhelming. Inside, a calming palette of raw concrete, timber and white plastered walls create a more neutral interior.

Combining modern design with the region’s vernacular and local craft, this new Mexican retreat is the perfect holiday bolthole.