Exciting, young firm Aberrant Architecture was formed while its founders David Chambers and Kevin Haley were still studying at London's College of Art in 2010. Since then, they've landed impressive gigs left right and centre – from an exhibition at Tate Modern to RIBA's spring 2016 exhibition – collecting a trio of D&AD Pencils along the way. Their newest project, a civic stage on Museum Green in Swansea, Wales, complements their growing portfolio of public design.

Exploring the relationship between art, architecture and the city, the concrete-based stage is part of a series of artworks commissioned for the new Swansea Boulevard & Waterfront Connections Art Programme. Intended for anyone and everyone, the stage will host just about anything the public can dream up;  from pop-up shops to impromtu musical performances.

Inspired by Swansea's industrial heritage, the stainless steel structure has been embedded with copper coins, saluting Swansea Bay's history as a key copper trading route, earning it the moniker 'Copperopolis'. Painted a vibrant sky blue, the stage stands out against the surrounding stoic Georgian architecture, and can be reconfigured easily by users to suit their varied needs.

With a manifesto that 'embraces normality', providing simple yet elegant solutions for everyday use, Aberrant Architecture have nailed their low-fi brand with this public work, that will see plenty of use from locals – Welsh weather permitting.